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Mecenat Art Museum / Naf Architect

 

Designed by Naf Architect & Design, the Mecenat Art Museum in Hiroshima is owned by painter Kanji Kato and was designed to house the work of Kato’s teacher, Japanese painter Kakudo Goami, and introduce Goami’s art work to a greater public. Goami’s artworks are studies in the variables of light – and the architect worked to create spaces which would show the works in a way to reflect this. The concrete structure is designed to eliminate interior columns and include open corners to maximize space and light – the surfaces are linked to create a sound structure with the sense of origami folds. As the location is in an older part of the city, the museum lights create an unexpected beacon at night and the building has become an instant landmark.

 

 

 

 

photos: Noriyuki Yano sources: evolo, archdaily

Zaha Hadid’s interpolation at St. Anthony’s College

 

A world famous British architect, Zaha Hadid, designed the New Middle East Centre at St. Anthony’s college at University of Oxford. According to the words of Dr. Eugene Rogan, the director of Middle East Centre, Hadid was the perfect choice for the project as she is one of Britain’s most acclaimed architects with the Middle East roots – which goes along with the Centre’s vision. The Building is designed in recognizable Hadid style and it is strongly contrasting the existing Victorian architecture, but at the same time it mirrors the surroundings with its reflective surface.

 

The curved structure clad in stainless steel creates a tunnel that connects two buildings and it intentionally protects an existing sequoia tree. Oak Veneer timber panels and unfinished precast concrete dominate the High-end interior while  25 skylights ensure plenty of daylight.

 

The new 1127 square meters building doubles the space of the Centre and includes a lecture theater, a gallery, a library and archive reading rooms. The building was named Investcorp, by its investor.

 

 

 

 

Moreau Kusunoki Architects’ “Art in the city” Wins The Awaited Guggenheim Helsinki Competition

 

After a year of shortlisting and refining, Moreau Kusunoki Architects from Paris has been selected amongst six finalists as the winner of the Guggenheim Helsinki competition.

 

Moreau Kusunoki Architects’ design project “Art in the city” includes several pavillions finished in the dark clad with concave roofs that will be connected by a series of garden patios. The patios will be used as a meeting point and can serve as a gallery exhibition space.  The design project also includes the waterfront, a park and a nearby urban area- all the qualities that jury conceptualized for the design. A lookout tower will rise from one side of the building, providing views of the waterfront.  The tower with a glazed top will also illuminate the tip of the scene in the manner of a lighthouse during the night.

 

The jury, chaired by Professor Mark Wigley, found the design highly respectful for the setting, the city grid and the needs of the society. “Art in the city” could become a future meeting point and an urban blend of people and art in Finland’s capital.

 

 

 

 

source: dezeen

Anon Pairot Promotes Sustainability by Turning Cassava Waste into Penta Lamp


Cassava is one of the crops that is being cultivated the most in Thailand and during certain times of the year, farmers face an excessive supply of it, causing a huge amount of waste and pollution. Wanting to find a solution to this problem and a use for all this wasted material, designer Anon Pairot created ‘Penta’, a pendant lamp that carries an esthetic value and is environmentally friendly.

 

‘Penta’s has a Pentagon shape (hence the name) that not only creates a strong structure, but reflects the shape of a cassava leaf as well. More strength is added by processing the material with a hi-pressure vacuum, where its fiber becomes solid and rigid, possessing a very interesting translucent effect while having little weight. The ‘penta’ production process generates zero waste and every defective part can be reprocessed and blended into a new lamp.

 

The best part of the cassava material is that it can be 100% recyclable and no chemical wastes are left behind. Furthermore, in suitable conditions, the material can be naturally decomposed within 2-3 weeks. With a product like the ‘penta’ lamp, Anon Pairot provides customers with sustainable lifestyle products.

 

 

source: designboom

Kobe Luminarie – Festival of Lights

 

For two weeks in December Kobe, Japan becomes a winter wonderland of lights.
Known as the Kobe Luminarie, the light show is a memorial to the Great Hanshin earthquake of 1995. The first show that year, under the banner ‘Dreams and Light’, was held as a message of hope to celebrate the city’s remarkable recovery.

 
Now an annual event, over 200,000 individually hand painted lights, donated by the Italian Government, are lit each year in the city’s Old Foreign Settlement, Produced by designers Valerio Festi and Hirokazu Imaoka each year has a new theme and attracts 5 million visitors.

 

 

 

 

source: mymodernnet

The Chicago Horizon Pavilion by Studio Ultramoderne Opens on The Shores of Lake Michigan

 

The pavilion named Horizon, designed by architecture studio Ultramoderne, won the Chicago Lakefront Kiosk Competition as a part of inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennale. The structure is designed by Aaron Forrest and Yasmin Vobis in collaboration with structural engineer Brett Schneider. It is located in Millennium Park on Chicago’s waterfront, and it is made of the largest possible square timber ( 56 foot by 56 foot) that can be transported in one piece.

The pavillion, built by using cross-laminated timber (CLT), which is a durable engineered wood made of layers and layers of lumber glued together at right angles, is dominated by a 17m large roof structure supported by only 12 slender columns. The inspiration for the pavilion came from several buildings made by Modernist architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and his experiments with flatness, like in the S R Crown Hall located at the nearby Illinois Institute of Technology. The Chicago Horizon offers amazing views from the elevated viewing platform;. towards Lake Michigan and Chicago’s skyline of skyscrapers.

 

 

 

 

source: dezeen

LAb[au]’s m0za1que – a Kinetic Light Art Installation

 
A permanent kinetic light art installation, ‘m0za1que’ is featured on the main wall of the entrance hall at Maison Mecatronique, Annecy-le-Vieux, France. Produced by Belgium-based agency LAb[au] the piece relates motion with color through the phenomena of light. The 3.4m x 6m wall is divided into 26 ×15 squares, where each of the 390 tiles is motorized by a linear actuator with a 10cm range. The individually controlled motion system creates three-dimensional reliefs of geometric patterns, which evolve following the logic of cellular automata. During the day the programmed motifs draw black shadows, while in the evening colored shadows appear. three light-projectors in primary colors of red, green, and blue create a uniform white illumination on the wall – the shadows in the tiles appear in the secondary colors of light. The colored illuminated surfaces appear and disappear according to the facade’s movement.

 

 

 

 

source: designboom, images: LAb[au]

A new artificial skylight system

 

A team of  scientists at Insubria University in Como, Italy have developed an artificial skylight system  to  imitate daylight. Imagine – the ability to create a ‘sunny sky’ in any environment.
The inventors are presenting the possibility of ‘sunlight’ in underground spaces, museums, hospitals, stores, offices – impacting all types of windowless spaces to create the impression of ‘infinite space’ and to better visual and psychological conditions.
CoeLux has the potential to affect SAD – Seasonal Affective Disorder – a form of depression common in North Europe during the long winter nights, offering an alternative to phototherapy (using single lamps to light dark spaces). Three different settings mimic sunlight of different geographical lighting scenes – Nordic environments, the Mediterranean and the Tropics.

 

source: dailymail

 

Virtual Reality Changes the Face of Architecture

 

Virtual reality will soon become almost indistinguishable from the real world. Based in Shoreditch, East London, Inition specializes in using new technologies such as virtual reality to create a range of experiences and installation, and noted that virtual reality has finally got to the point where the experience matches people’s expectations.

 

The studio has been working with the developer version of Oculus Rift, a virtual reality headset that was announced on the crowd-funding website Kickstarter in 2012.

 

The Oculus Rift was sort of the poster child for virtual reality. It is a seven-inch mobile phone-type screen and two lenses. It’s that simple.

 

The developer version of Oculus Rift has a very low-resolution screen, but with the pixel density of mobile phone screens rapidly increasing, it won’t be long before virtual reality becomes as life-like as the real world.

 

“We’re going to see this year a headset where it’s starting to get quite difficult to distinguish whether you’re actually wearing a headset or not,” claims the developers of the Oculus. “When we start to get super-high-resolution headsets with the type of display technology that we’re seeing on the market now, it’s going to blur the line between what is reality and what is virtual.”

 

 

source: dezeen

The Warp- A New Attraction And the Viewing Point As a Part of a Post-Earthquake Reconstruction in Yunnan

 

A little mountain town Ludian in a Chinese province Yunnan, was damaged by earthquakes in 2012 and 2014. As a part of post-earthquake reconstruction, architects and professors at the University of Hong Kong, John Lin and Olivier Ottervaere, with the help of first year architecture students have built the platform named Warp-  a 130 m long elevated viewing point which will also serve as a roadside market and the meeting point.

 

The hilly form of the wooden platform, very steep and curved, is designed to blend in and imitate the landscape, providing two mirrored areas in its shape, high and low, envisioned to be used for viewing and resting. Long steps along the structure’s base will entirely be used as a fruit market for selling local products as well as a meeting point for town’s residents, mostly composed out of Muslim population.

 

This project is the third and the last in a series of three wooden structures build in Yunnan province by two architects in a post-earthquake experimental project; The Pinch, The Sweep and The Warp.

 

 

 

source:domusweb