LuxeLife

The Warp- A New Attraction And the Viewing Point As a Part of a Post-Earthquake Reconstruction in Yunnan

 

A little mountain town Ludian in a Chinese province Yunnan, was damaged by earthquakes in 2012 and 2014. As a part of post-earthquake reconstruction, architects and professors at the University of Hong Kong, John Lin and Olivier Ottervaere, with the help of first year architecture students have built the platform named Warp-  a 130 m long elevated viewing point which will also serve as a roadside market and the meeting point.

 

The hilly form of the wooden platform, very steep and curved, is designed to blend in and imitate the landscape, providing two mirrored areas in its shape, high and low, envisioned to be used for viewing and resting. Long steps along the structure’s base will entirely be used as a fruit market for selling local products as well as a meeting point for town’s residents, mostly composed out of Muslim population.

 

This project is the third and the last in a series of three wooden structures build in Yunnan province by two architects in a post-earthquake experimental project; The Pinch, The Sweep and The Warp.

 

 

 

source:domusweb

Tangent’s Kihou Lighting Uses Liquid & Air Bubbles to Create Sublime Ambiance

 

Tangent Design is known for developing unconventional illumination systems, creating environments that result in sublime ambiances as evidenced in ‘Kihou’. The indirect lighting product uses two kinds of liquid and air bubbles to realize an effervescent effect of pulsating golden bulbs. A sticky medium fills a ceramic bowl, topped by a thin layer of black silicone oil outfitted by LEDs embedded at the bottom of the vessel. A small pump then pushes air upwards, making luminous bubbles rise from the dark surface. the combination of the viscous liquid, the lightness of the oil, the rhythm of the bubbles and the unexpected noise, results in a mysterious contrast between the golden light and black surface. ‘Kihou’ was part of the ’10/10′ exhibition curated by François Bernard at MODA International during Maison et Objet in Paris.

 

 

source: designboom

TreexOffice Changing the Perspective of the Workplace

 

A temporary pop-up coworking space build around a tree made for business people and creative workers in London’s Hoxton Square Park offers a new concept of working environment, one that is closer to nature.

 

TREExOFFICE is designed by Natalie Jeremijenko in collaboration with artists Shuster + Moseley, architects Tate Harmer and briefing architects Gensler from Londn’s Tate Harmer studio.

 

Made of compressed paper, see-through plastic and translucent polycarbonate it allows views to the park and the greenery. The roof is translucent, so the sunlight is pouring in and provides plenty of daylight for the working area instead of the fluorescent lighting. The exterior of TreeXOffice reflects the surrounding area and blends into the environment.

 

Eight workspaces in the TREExOFFICE are available for businesses, creative workers and community groups to hire for the next seven months. It is equipped with a power supply and WiFi and can host small meetings or intimate events.

 

“The innovative design of the TREExOFFICE will provide a space not only where people can work and meet, but also to interact with the natural environment,” said health, social care and culture councillor Jonathan McShane, describing it as “a vastly different experience from working in a modern office”.

 

 

sources: cbc.ca, urdesignmag, dezeen

Diwali festival of lights

 

Diwali, festival of lights, is an ancient Hindu festival that takes place each year between mid-October and mid-November. Deepawali or Diwali is the largest, and the brightest of all Hindu festivals officially celebrated in Fiji, Guyana, India, Malaysia, Mauritius, Nepal, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago. The festival is marked for five days of celebration, whereas each day is distinguished by a different tradition.

 

Before the Diwali night people clean, renovate and decorate their houses with diyas, lamps and candles and create design patterns called rangoli on the floor using colored powders or sand. On the third night of Diwali, families gather in Lakshmi Puja, a traditional family prays to Lakshmi, a Hindu goddess of wealth and prosperity. The Lakshmi Puja is followed by mouth-watering feasts and fireworks.

 

The fourth day of Diwali, Padva is dedicated to wife–husband relationship, while Bhau-Beej, the last day festival is dedicated to sister–brother bond when brothers visit their married sisters who welcome them with love and a lavish meal.

 

 

 

source: national geographic

Urbane Kultur Adds Boomerang-shaped Extension to Domed Tournesol Swimming Pool

 

French architecture studio Urbane Kultur has refurbished and extended their dome-shaped swimming pool just outside Strasbourg, which is one of nearly 200 built around France in the 1970s. The Tournesol swimming pool was built in 1975 in Lingolsheim, just outside Strasbourg, but suffered from poor insulation and a cramped layout, with changing rooms around its perimeter. To rectify this, Strasbourg studio Urbane Kultur was commissioned to refurbish the building and add an extension at the side for new changing rooms and offices, freeing up space inside for two new swimming pools.

 

During the 1970s and early 1980s, 183 of the dome-shaped swimming pools were built in France. The design, by architect Bernard Schoeller, is one of a number commissioned by the French government to encourage more people to swim, following the country’s poor performance in the sport in the 1968 Olympics. Schoeller named the buildings Tournesol – or sunflower in English – and built them with a self-supporting steel-framed dome that allows for a large column-free space inside. They also feature two curved sliding panels so that one side of the building can be opened up in summer, inspired by the way sunflowers angle themselves towards the sun.

 

Some of the pools have since been refurbished, a few have been heritage-protected, and more than 40 have been closed, irreparably damaged, or demolished. Save for the steel frame, the concrete foundations, and the original 25-meter pool, the entire dome was rebuilt in order to improve its insulation. The exterior was then clad in black rubber and the interior was covered in white stretched canvas.

 

At the sides, where changing rooms and the entrance used to be, two new pools have been added. One has a water jet and a tidal swimming zone, and the other provides a paddling pool for infants. A curved section of glazing was also added at the side, where the previous entrance was, offering a view of a new landscaped courtyard outside. Beside the dome, a boomerang-shaped extension has been added, with a discreet corridor linking the two buildings. It replaces a car park and two box-shaped buildings that housed an equipment room and a lifeguards’ room.

 

The extension provides 1,190 square meters of new space, doubling the size of the complex. It houses offices and rooms for technical equipment in one wing, and showers and changing rooms in the other wing, and was clad in steel panels to provide subtle reflections of the surroundings. Urbane Kultur is now working on the refurbishment of another Tournesol swimming pool in Ferette, 154 kilometers south of Strasbourg, near the Swiss border.

 

 

 

 

 

source: dezeen, photos by Jean Baptiste Dorner & Urbane Kulturun

Accommodation inside the Bauhaus Dessau

 

Bauhaus,  a famous German Modernist design school that operated from 1919 to 1933 reconstructed its Studio Building dormitories for visitors, who can now spend a night in an authentic room and enhance their Dessau Museum experience.

 

Studio Building is the structure of 28 studio flats of about 24 squaremeters that was a residence of junior masters and promising students.  One room has been designed with authentic furniture following the original setting while others have been decorated and personalised with the design products of their former inhabitants, including Marcel Breuer, Josef and Anni Albers, Hannes Mayer and Joost Schmidt, Franz Erlich, Marianne Brandt and Gertrud Arndt.

 

Guest use communal bathrooms and showers just like the residents in the 1920s did. The room prices range from 35€ for single room to 60€ for double room on weekends.

 

 

 

 

 

 

source: bauhaus-dessau.de

Swiss Students Design Wooden Floating Island for Lake Zurich Art Event

 

A group of talented Swiss students from ETH Zurich working with Studio Tom Emerson, have designed a that will be the centerpiece of Zurich’s 2016 Manifesta festival. A biennial celebration of contemporary art located on Lake Zurich, the Pavillon of Reflections, which will serve as the central node for the 100-day festival, will have an open-air cinema, LED screen, and an integrated swimming pool.

 

The wooden pavilion is a large, open-air structure designed to be a multifunctional floating platform. During the festival, it will be used as a community space for dialogue and reflection on the festival’s artwork. The wooden structure will have a giant LED screen, spectator seating, a swimming pool, and a bar. During the day, the pavilion will be used as an urban island for relaxing and swimming, while at night it will serve as a place for reflection on the displayed artworks.

 

Although the swimming pool may seem a bit out of sorts with the purpose of the pavilion, the swimming culture in Zurich, which dates back to ancient Roman settlements, is still quite prominent today. The pools or badis not only serve as community recreational meeting places, but also function as architectural monuments around the city. Accordingly, the pavilion, with its integrated swimming pool, will serve as the central activity center for Manifesta, providing space for “both encounters and education, a place for both passing the time with physical activity and with intellectual pursuits.”

 

Zurich will host the eleventh edition of Manifesta between the 11th of June and the 18th of September.

 

 

Sources: Archdaily, Images © ETH Studio Emerson

Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa from Sanaa, Tokyo, will Design the new Art Gallery of New South Wells in Sidney, Australia

 

The new Art Gallery of New South Wells in Sydney, which is expected to be built in 2021 will be designed by the Japanese firm Saana. Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa are the names behind the firm, and they were in strong competition with great architects of today  including Renzo Piano, Herzog & de Meuron, David Chipperfield and Kengo Kuma.

 

Saana’s design has been selected as five shortlisted architects;  Kengo Kuma& associates, Kerry Hill Architects, RMA Architects and Sean Godsell Architects. The director of Art Gallery NSW, Michael Branda and architects Toshiko Mori, Glenn Murcutt and Juhani Pallasmaa made the jury.

 

The structure is designed as a series of pavillions cascading towards Sydney Harbour and framing the new public plaza. The new space will be expanded north of the existing  Art Gallery NSW building and it will make the city’s eastern cultural zone. The new building will more than double the gallery’s permanent exhibition space and it will also hold the temporary exhibition space, education rooms, an expansive research archive, restaurants and cafes.

 

 

sources: dailytelegraph.com.au  aasarchitecture.com.au

Len Lye Centre- New Zealand’s “Temple of Art”

 

New Zealand got its first Museum of Contemporary Art, located in New Plymouth. The museum is adjacent to Govett-Brewster Art Gallery and it is entirely dedicated to a single artist, late filmmaker and a kinetic sculptor –  Len Lye.  The design of the building was the work of Patterson Architects Associates,  New Zealand’s most recognised architectural firm. Lye’s opus, dominated by the use of steel and light tied to a strong connection between art and architecture inspired the team of architects in creating this so-called “Temple of art”. The impressive curved walls of stainless steel reflect Lye’s use of metal and reflections in his kinetic sculptures but also underlines the industrial innovation and development of the surrounding area.  The contemporary interior combines beton floors and waving walls that intensify the futuristic form.

 

The museum exhibits Lye’s work in kinetic sculpture, film, painting, drawing, photography, batik, writing, etc. It also houses a cinema wich displays Len Lye’s film achievements, as well as international and experimental films and festival programming.

 

 

 

sources: contemporist.com arcitecturenow.co.nz suff.co.nz e-architect.co.uk

Tangle Sculptural Pendant Light Installation

 

Tangle is a sculptural pendant light installation consisting of three intertwining modules. The installation draws its influence from modern jewelry design, mobiles, and the crystalline molecular structures of natural stones. Brass and stone are intricately combined with integrated LED strips that accentuate different parts of the artifact. Tangle, designed by Flip Sellin and Claudia Pineda de Castro for COORDINATION-berlin, debuted at Berlin Design Selection during Milan Design Week.

 

 

 

 

 

source: designboom