LuxeLife

Urbane Kultur Adds Boomerang-shaped Extension to Domed Tournesol Swimming Pool

 

French architecture studio Urbane Kultur has refurbished and extended their dome-shaped swimming pool just outside Strasbourg, which is one of nearly 200 built around France in the 1970s. The Tournesol swimming pool was built in 1975 in Lingolsheim, just outside Strasbourg, but suffered from poor insulation and a cramped layout, with changing rooms around its perimeter. To rectify this, Strasbourg studio Urbane Kultur was commissioned to refurbish the building and add an extension at the side for new changing rooms and offices, freeing up space inside for two new swimming pools.

 

During the 1970s and early 1980s, 183 of the dome-shaped swimming pools were built in France. The design, by architect Bernard Schoeller, is one of a number commissioned by the French government to encourage more people to swim, following the country’s poor performance in the sport in the 1968 Olympics. Schoeller named the buildings Tournesol – or sunflower in English – and built them with a self-supporting steel-framed dome that allows for a large column-free space inside. They also feature two curved sliding panels so that one side of the building can be opened up in summer, inspired by the way sunflowers angle themselves towards the sun.

 

Some of the pools have since been refurbished, a few have been heritage-protected, and more than 40 have been closed, irreparably damaged, or demolished. Save for the steel frame, the concrete foundations, and the original 25-meter pool, the entire dome was rebuilt in order to improve its insulation. The exterior was then clad in black rubber and the interior was covered in white stretched canvas.

 

At the sides, where changing rooms and the entrance used to be, two new pools have been added. One has a water jet and a tidal swimming zone, and the other provides a paddling pool for infants. A curved section of glazing was also added at the side, where the previous entrance was, offering a view of a new landscaped courtyard outside. Beside the dome, a boomerang-shaped extension has been added, with a discreet corridor linking the two buildings. It replaces a car park and two box-shaped buildings that housed an equipment room and a lifeguards’ room.

 

The extension provides 1,190 square meters of new space, doubling the size of the complex. It houses offices and rooms for technical equipment in one wing, and showers and changing rooms in the other wing, and was clad in steel panels to provide subtle reflections of the surroundings. Urbane Kultur is now working on the refurbishment of another Tournesol swimming pool in Ferette, 154 kilometers south of Strasbourg, near the Swiss border.

 

 

 

 

 

source: dezeen, photos by Jean Baptiste Dorner & Urbane Kulturun

Accommodation inside the Bauhaus Dessau

 

Bauhaus,  a famous German Modernist design school that operated from 1919 to 1933 reconstructed its Studio Building dormitories for visitors, who can now spend a night in an authentic room and enhance their Dessau Museum experience.

 

Studio Building is the structure of 28 studio flats of about 24 squaremeters that was a residence of junior masters and promising students.  One room has been designed with authentic furniture following the original setting while others have been decorated and personalised with the design products of their former inhabitants, including Marcel Breuer, Josef and Anni Albers, Hannes Mayer and Joost Schmidt, Franz Erlich, Marianne Brandt and Gertrud Arndt.

 

Guest use communal bathrooms and showers just like the residents in the 1920s did. The room prices range from 35€ for single room to 60€ for double room on weekends.

 

 

 

 

 

 

source: bauhaus-dessau.de

Swiss Students Design Wooden Floating Island for Lake Zurich Art Event

 

A group of talented Swiss students from ETH Zurich working with Studio Tom Emerson, have designed a that will be the centerpiece of Zurich’s 2016 Manifesta festival. A biennial celebration of contemporary art located on Lake Zurich, the Pavillon of Reflections, which will serve as the central node for the 100-day festival, will have an open-air cinema, LED screen, and an integrated swimming pool.

 

The wooden pavilion is a large, open-air structure designed to be a multifunctional floating platform. During the festival, it will be used as a community space for dialogue and reflection on the festival’s artwork. The wooden structure will have a giant LED screen, spectator seating, a swimming pool, and a bar. During the day, the pavilion will be used as an urban island for relaxing and swimming, while at night it will serve as a place for reflection on the displayed artworks.

 

Although the swimming pool may seem a bit out of sorts with the purpose of the pavilion, the swimming culture in Zurich, which dates back to ancient Roman settlements, is still quite prominent today. The pools or badis not only serve as community recreational meeting places, but also function as architectural monuments around the city. Accordingly, the pavilion, with its integrated swimming pool, will serve as the central activity center for Manifesta, providing space for “both encounters and education, a place for both passing the time with physical activity and with intellectual pursuits.”

 

Zurich will host the eleventh edition of Manifesta between the 11th of June and the 18th of September.

 

 

Sources: Archdaily, Images © ETH Studio Emerson

Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa from Sanaa, Tokyo, will Design the new Art Gallery of New South Wells in Sidney, Australia

 

The new Art Gallery of New South Wells in Sydney, which is expected to be built in 2021 will be designed by the Japanese firm Saana. Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa are the names behind the firm, and they were in strong competition with great architects of today  including Renzo Piano, Herzog & de Meuron, David Chipperfield and Kengo Kuma.

 

Saana’s design has been selected as five shortlisted architects;  Kengo Kuma& associates, Kerry Hill Architects, RMA Architects and Sean Godsell Architects. The director of Art Gallery NSW, Michael Branda and architects Toshiko Mori, Glenn Murcutt and Juhani Pallasmaa made the jury.

 

The structure is designed as a series of pavillions cascading towards Sydney Harbour and framing the new public plaza. The new space will be expanded north of the existing  Art Gallery NSW building and it will make the city’s eastern cultural zone. The new building will more than double the gallery’s permanent exhibition space and it will also hold the temporary exhibition space, education rooms, an expansive research archive, restaurants and cafes.

 

 

sources: dailytelegraph.com.au  aasarchitecture.com.au

Len Lye Centre- New Zealand’s “Temple of Art”

 

New Zealand got its first Museum of Contemporary Art, located in New Plymouth. The museum is adjacent to Govett-Brewster Art Gallery and it is entirely dedicated to a single artist, late filmmaker and a kinetic sculptor –  Len Lye.  The design of the building was the work of Patterson Architects Associates,  New Zealand’s most recognised architectural firm. Lye’s opus, dominated by the use of steel and light tied to a strong connection between art and architecture inspired the team of architects in creating this so-called “Temple of art”. The impressive curved walls of stainless steel reflect Lye’s use of metal and reflections in his kinetic sculptures but also underlines the industrial innovation and development of the surrounding area.  The contemporary interior combines beton floors and waving walls that intensify the futuristic form.

 

The museum exhibits Lye’s work in kinetic sculpture, film, painting, drawing, photography, batik, writing, etc. It also houses a cinema wich displays Len Lye’s film achievements, as well as international and experimental films and festival programming.

 

 

 

sources: contemporist.com arcitecturenow.co.nz suff.co.nz e-architect.co.uk

Tangle Sculptural Pendant Light Installation

 

Tangle is a sculptural pendant light installation consisting of three intertwining modules. The installation draws its influence from modern jewelry design, mobiles, and the crystalline molecular structures of natural stones. Brass and stone are intricately combined with integrated LED strips that accentuate different parts of the artifact. Tangle, designed by Flip Sellin and Claudia Pineda de Castro for COORDINATION-berlin, debuted at Berlin Design Selection during Milan Design Week.

 

 

 

 

 

source: designboom

The Impressive Air France’s Boeing 777 Flies with JonOne’s Signature

 

John Andrew Perello known by the artistic name JonOne is a New York-born painter and graffiti artist of Dominican origin who was given an incredible opportunity to paint the newest Boeing 777 recently unveiled by the Air France to mark the company’s 80th anniversary. This is not the first collaboration between the artist and Air France and his fusion of original street art and painting is well known in France. At the beggining of 2015, after multiple international exhibitions, JonOne’s  painting “Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité” was inaugurated at the National Assembly, in the Salon des Mariannes and this painting even became the French stamp. For the past 80 years, Air France has had a special relationship with the contemporary art world collaborating with many contemporary artists;  Zao Wou-Ki, Jeff Koons, JonOne and others.  JonOne’s  exceptional work of art represents the French flag and symbolizes freedom while speaking the company’s slogan: Air France, France is in the Air. For one year, JonOne’s design will mark Boeing 777 traveling on a legendary route from Paris to New York.

 

 

 

 

sources: speerstra, design-hunting, airfrance

Schemata’s Jo Nagasaka Weaves Luminous Installation Using Optic Fibers

 

To celebrate the launch of Swedish textile company Kinnasand‘s new ‘ZOOM’ collection, Jo Nagasaka of Schemata Architects created a luminous installation presented at the brand’s showroom during the most recent Tokyo Design Week.

 
Composed of three tube-like forms, each one stands independently and have been crafted using a delicate white fabric from Kinnasand’s latest collection. Strands of optic fiber were woven into the fabric to highlight the transparency of the cylindrical structures to create three ‘loops’. This addition reinforced the overall surface strength, allowing the installation to produce a glowing effect, and stimulate a gentle, bouncing movement which effectively influenced the project’s name – ‘boingboing.’

 

 

 

 

source: designboom, images by nacasa & partners

Photothrope Shirt by Pauline van D

 

A Dutch designer, Pauline van Dongen specialized in women’s fashion combined with technology,  has developed a helpful piece of clothing for all the joggers on city roads and pathways. As a seasoned runner in urban Amsterdam,  van Dongen based this idea on her own needs and experience. She designed an illuminated garment using LEDs and foil to improve safety for night runners. The garment is made from technical jersey with washable strips of the low-energy lights installed inside and parts of reflective foil material that curve around the body. There is a little battery hidden in the pocket of the garment allowing lights to be be switched on/ off . Van Dongen is currently working on future versions with LEDs that respond to the runner’s movement or changes in surroundings. Also,  her aim is to create a LED powered shirt that anyone would choose to wear regardless of safety aspects.

 

 

source: dezeen

Grow-On-Us Floating Landscape by Balmori Associates Installed on Gowanus Canal

 

‘Grow-On-Us’ is an experimental collaboration between New York-based Balmori Associates and the Gowanus Canal Conservancy. The project is an ongoing research program that focuses on cleaning water through phyto-remediation, desalination, and rainwater collection by means of irrigated, productive floating gardens. Balmori designed, fabricated, and launched the floating landscape in Brooklyn’s Gowanus Canal, one of the most polluted bodies of water in the United States.

 

‘Grow-On-Us’ is one in a series of ongoing projects that Balmori has designed to act as sponges for filtering and cleaning water, as well as providing small wildlife habitats within the NYC area. The floating landscape is composed of transformed metal culvert pipes. Each of the 54 test tubes isolate various plants (over 30 were selected), watering conditions (clean water through phyto-remediation, desalinate canal brackish water through evaporation and condensation and collect rainwater), and a variety of buoyant construction materials (coconut fibers, bamboo, mycelium, and matrix of recycled plastic).

 

The float has been monitored since its initial launch in mid September this year, and is being continually studied for viability. Researchers will also explore functions for ‘grow-on-us’ including its potential as a multi-functional green infrastructure: shoreline protection, biodiverse habitats, energy production, public space, etc. The project is currently funded through a US$20,000 grant received from the Cornelia & Michael Bessie foundation.

 

 

 

images by balmori associates inc