LuxeLife

Santiago Calatrava’s Turning Torso Wins CTBUH’s Award – 10 Years After Completion

 

Rotating a full 90 degrees along nine pentagonal sections, Santiago Calatrava’s “Turning Torso” was deemed the world’s first twisting skyscraper upon its completion in 2005. Still Scandinavia’s tallest tower, the 190-meter Malmö skyscraper has recently been awarded a 10 Year Award by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) for its continued value to the surrounding area and successful performance across a number of categories, including environmental, engineering performance, vertical transport, iconography, and others.

 

The CTBUH Awards are an independent review of building projects, judged by a panel of industry experts. Projects are recognized for making an extraordinary contribution to the advancement of tall buildings and the urban environment, and for achieving sustainability at the broadest level.

 

Turning Torso was featured in the CTBUH Best Tall Buildings Book, as well as celebrated at the CTBUH Annual Awards Symposium, which took place at the Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago.

 

source: CTBUH

Rotterdam introduces the Smog Free Tower by Daan Roosegaarde

 

An internationally known  Dutch designer and an innovator, Daan Rosegarden has brought to light his Smog Free Tower,  the largest air purifier in the world installed in Rotterdam, NL. The seven- meter- tall structure processes 30,000 cubic metres of air per hour- creating a pocket of clean air around it, making the fresh air available and free to the public. The smog is absorbed trough the top of the tower and the purified air is released trough the vents on the sides creating a zone of fresh air around it. Smog Free Tower runs on green energy and uses no more electricity than a water boiler. Furthermore, the pollutants extracted from the smog is compressed into tiny stones and turned into beautiful rings.  After its duty in Rotterdam, Tower ‘s next destinations will be Mumbai and Beijing.

 

 

 

 

sources: beforeitsnews, dezeen, techinsider, designboom

Manyata Embassy Business Park

 

To the north of Bangalore, India, is Manyata Embassy Business Park, one of the largest operational technology and business parks in the country. With commercial, residential, hospitality and retail components, on-site facilities include a large sports complex and intra-city transportation. International lighting consultant group DPA Lighting Design developed and implemented a lighting plan for the entire site including the soft and hard landscaping, pedestrian and vehicular circulation, and building facades.

 
At the centre of the entrance plaza, greeting visitors to the site, sits the ‘Binary Sculpture’ artwork.
DPA worked closely with Indian multimedia artist Romicon Revola, to implement her vision of creating a sculpture whose form was expressed by concealed integrated lighting. The sculpture itself is a three-metre cube constructed from stainless steel, with each of the four visible faces featuring an array of 0 – 1 binary cut-outs, making reference to the IT nature of work of many of the park’s companies.

 
The programmable LED modules allow color, brightness and fade rate to be controlled for an almost endless number of visually dynamic effects to be created, resulting in a vibrant, eye catching piece of artwork.
Embassy Manyata has been awarded the Best IT Park Project by NDTV Property Awards and the Best IT Special Economic-Zone by Software Technology Parks of India (STPI).

 

 

Refined Luxury Reinvented at Giorgio Armani’s Flagship in Milan

 

Giorgio Armani recently unveiled his redesigned Milan Flagship located in the famous Via Montenapoleone. Designed by Mr. Armani himself and his team of architects, the focus was to keep the historic geometrical features of the building and to lead it into the interior as well.

 

The store spreads over 1,082 square meters and three floors. The sales area covers 1000 square meters with the ground floor dedicated to women’s clothing, menswear on first, with  separate fragrance and accessories departments within, and areas for made-to-measure and pret-a-porter gowns. The complete store was customized and furnished with the latest designs from the new Armani Casa collection.

 

A grand elliptical staircase is the highlight of the space. The essence of Armani’s refined luxury is captured in this bespoke design made in metal with platinum finish steps in white onyx. Every room is customized, flooring made of marble and onyx, matching the printed silk lining on the walls shifting the color themes from petrol blue, silver, dark green to ivory.

 

 

 

sources: mensfolio, blingbling, luxuo

The Beauty Library Designed by Nendo Displays Organic Cosmetic on Bookshelves

 

A Japanese design studio Nendo has designed a unique cosmetic store in Tokyo called “The Beauty Library.” Nature’s way organic cosmetic and food boutique is located near Aoyama street- the famous shopping area where many luxury flagship stores designed by world’s famous architects can be found. Colorful products are displayed on wooden bookshelves in a simple contemporary ambiance based on a library layout. Vintage tables are integrated into the shelving and serve as a “self- study” spaces, where customers can sit and look trough the products or use the in-store tablets that are available for information. Besides rejuvenating cosmetic products,  Beauty library provides an in-store café to enjoy healthy organic food and beverages.  The boutique promotes a health-conscious approach to the beauty where outside and inside play equally important roles.

 

 

sources: glamshops, dezeen

Dust by Sibling- An Innovative Multi-Sensory Concept Store in Melbourne

 

 

Dust is a new concept of retail experience presented by Australian Design Studio Sibling in Melbourne. At a recent Australian Interior Design Awards Dust received the Premier Award for Australian Interior Design and the Retail Design Award while Sibling received the Emerging Interior Design Practice Award.

 

This new multi-sensory concept store was inspired by its trademark, the Golden ratio.

 

The store is divided into two areas. Customers first enter the physical zone where they can experience the material impressions of the products like color and texture.  Then follows  the encounter with the digital zone where they use a tablet to customize their garments that are made on site.

 

The backdrop of the space is made by matrix-type metallic frameworks whereas the setting is enhanced by mirrored reflections, custom scents,  spatial sounds, animated screens and illuminated installations.

 

 

 

source: siblingsnation

Sydney Opera House Finally in Possession of Le Corbusier’s Wool Tapestry

 

In 1958, a year after  Danish architect Jørn Utzon won the international competition for the  Sidney Opera House,  he acquired the wool tapestry from the famous architect Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris, known as Le Corbusier. A 6.5 sq.m. tapestry, Les Dés Sont Jetés (The Dice Are Cast) involved the city features and architectural details of the planned Opera House.

 

Utzon and his wife thanked  Le Corbusier  for the tapestry in a beautiful letter they wrote in 1960.  Part of the letter said:
“For quite some time we have intended to write to you again in order to tell you how extremely happy we are for your wonderful tapestry. It is a daily source of delight and beauty not only for ourselves and our children but for all our friends and guests, too.

 

In 1966, a year after Le Corbusier`s death, Utzon quit the Opera House project dissatisfied with the Australian authorities who wanted to decorate the interior quickly and on a low-cost . Sydney’s Opera House was opened in 1973, but without  Le Corbusier’s tapestry or Utzon’s interior design.

 

Utzon was re-engaged by the Opera House Trust in 1999 when he completed the plans and design principles for the evolving building in collaboration with his son Jan.

 

Now, 57 years after  Utzon’s work on this project and 7 years after his death, his dream will be accomplished and Le Corbusier’s tapestry will finally be placed where it should have been all these years.

 

The Sydney Opera House bought the tapestry from the Danish auction house Bruun Rasmussen during the auction of Utzon’s art collection. The tapestry cost more than $400,000 and the  money donated by philanthropists made this purchase possible.  From now on it will hang in the main box office foyer of the Sydney Opera House.

 

sources: goldmarkart, srh.com.au

Mecenat Art Museum / Naf Architect

 

Designed by Naf Architect & Design, the Mecenat Art Museum in Hiroshima is owned by painter Kanji Kato and was designed to house the work of Kato’s teacher, Japanese painter Kakudo Goami, and introduce Goami’s art work to a greater public. Goami’s artworks are studies in the variables of light – and the architect worked to create spaces which would show the works in a way to reflect this. The concrete structure is designed to eliminate interior columns and include open corners to maximize space and light – the surfaces are linked to create a sound structure with the sense of origami folds. As the location is in an older part of the city, the museum lights create an unexpected beacon at night and the building has become an instant landmark.

 

 

 

 

photos: Noriyuki Yano sources: evolo, archdaily

Zaha Hadid’s interpolation at St. Anthony’s College

 

A world famous British architect, Zaha Hadid, designed the New Middle East Centre at St. Anthony’s college at University of Oxford. According to the words of Dr. Eugene Rogan, the director of Middle East Centre, Hadid was the perfect choice for the project as she is one of Britain’s most acclaimed architects with the Middle East roots – which goes along with the Centre’s vision. The Building is designed in recognizable Hadid style and it is strongly contrasting the existing Victorian architecture, but at the same time it mirrors the surroundings with its reflective surface.

 

The curved structure clad in stainless steel creates a tunnel that connects two buildings and it intentionally protects an existing sequoia tree. Oak Veneer timber panels and unfinished precast concrete dominate the High-end interior while  25 skylights ensure plenty of daylight.

 

The new 1127 square meters building doubles the space of the Centre and includes a lecture theater, a gallery, a library and archive reading rooms. The building was named Investcorp, by its investor.

 

 

 

 

Moreau Kusunoki Architects’ “Art in the city” Wins The Awaited Guggenheim Helsinki Competition

 

After a year of shortlisting and refining, Moreau Kusunoki Architects from Paris has been selected amongst six finalists as the winner of the Guggenheim Helsinki competition.

 

Moreau Kusunoki Architects’ design project “Art in the city” includes several pavillions finished in the dark clad with concave roofs that will be connected by a series of garden patios. The patios will be used as a meeting point and can serve as a gallery exhibition space.  The design project also includes the waterfront, a park and a nearby urban area- all the qualities that jury conceptualized for the design. A lookout tower will rise from one side of the building, providing views of the waterfront.  The tower with a glazed top will also illuminate the tip of the scene in the manner of a lighthouse during the night.

 

The jury, chaired by Professor Mark Wigley, found the design highly respectful for the setting, the city grid and the needs of the society. “Art in the city” could become a future meeting point and an urban blend of people and art in Finland’s capital.

 

 

 

 

source: dezeen