LuxeLife

Kobe Luminarie – Festival of Lights

 

For two weeks in December Kobe, Japan becomes a winter wonderland of lights.
Known as the Kobe Luminarie, the light show is a memorial to the Great Hanshin earthquake of 1995. The first show that year, under the banner ‘Dreams and Light’, was held as a message of hope to celebrate the city’s remarkable recovery.

 
Now an annual event, over 200,000 individually hand painted lights, donated by the Italian Government, are lit each year in the city’s Old Foreign Settlement, Produced by designers Valerio Festi and Hirokazu Imaoka each year has a new theme and attracts 5 million visitors.

 

 

 

 

source: mymodernnet

Diwali festival of lights

 

Diwali, festival of lights, is an ancient Hindu festival that takes place each year between mid-October and mid-November. Deepawali or Diwali is the largest, and the brightest of all Hindu festivals officially celebrated in Fiji, Guyana, India, Malaysia, Mauritius, Nepal, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago. The festival is marked for five days of celebration, whereas each day is distinguished by a different tradition.

 

Before the Diwali night people clean, renovate and decorate their houses with diyas, lamps and candles and create design patterns called rangoli on the floor using colored powders or sand. On the third night of Diwali, families gather in Lakshmi Puja, a traditional family prays to Lakshmi, a Hindu goddess of wealth and prosperity. The Lakshmi Puja is followed by mouth-watering feasts and fireworks.

 

The fourth day of Diwali, Padva is dedicated to wife–husband relationship, while Bhau-Beej, the last day festival is dedicated to sister–brother bond when brothers visit their married sisters who welcome them with love and a lavish meal.

 

 

 

source: national geographic

Accommodation inside the Bauhaus Dessau

 

Bauhaus,  a famous German Modernist design school that operated from 1919 to 1933 reconstructed its Studio Building dormitories for visitors, who can now spend a night in an authentic room and enhance their Dessau Museum experience.

 

Studio Building is the structure of 28 studio flats of about 24 squaremeters that was a residence of junior masters and promising students.  One room has been designed with authentic furniture following the original setting while others have been decorated and personalised with the design products of their former inhabitants, including Marcel Breuer, Josef and Anni Albers, Hannes Mayer and Joost Schmidt, Franz Erlich, Marianne Brandt and Gertrud Arndt.

 

Guest use communal bathrooms and showers just like the residents in the 1920s did. The room prices range from 35€ for single room to 60€ for double room on weekends.

 

 

 

 

 

 

source: bauhaus-dessau.de

Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa from Sanaa, Tokyo, will Design the new Art Gallery of New South Wells in Sidney, Australia

 

The new Art Gallery of New South Wells in Sydney, which is expected to be built in 2021 will be designed by the Japanese firm Saana. Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa are the names behind the firm, and they were in strong competition with great architects of today  including Renzo Piano, Herzog & de Meuron, David Chipperfield and Kengo Kuma.

 

Saana’s design has been selected as five shortlisted architects;  Kengo Kuma& associates, Kerry Hill Architects, RMA Architects and Sean Godsell Architects. The director of Art Gallery NSW, Michael Branda and architects Toshiko Mori, Glenn Murcutt and Juhani Pallasmaa made the jury.

 

The structure is designed as a series of pavillions cascading towards Sydney Harbour and framing the new public plaza. The new space will be expanded north of the existing  Art Gallery NSW building and it will make the city’s eastern cultural zone. The new building will more than double the gallery’s permanent exhibition space and it will also hold the temporary exhibition space, education rooms, an expansive research archive, restaurants and cafes.

 

 

sources: dailytelegraph.com.au  aasarchitecture.com.au

Leo Villareal’s Multiverse

 

 

Multiverse, the largest and most complex light sculpture created by American artist Leo Villareal. Visitors pass through the Concourse walkway between the East and West Buildings of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. The work features approximately 41,000 computer-programmed LED (light-emitting diode) nodes that run through channels along the 200-foot-long space. Development of this LED project began in 2005, and installation took place between September and December 2008.

 

Villareal’s work features movement and light, qualities that make this installation particularly well suited for the Gallery’s underground walkway, an area through which thousands of people pass daily. Once the appropriate hardware was installed in the existing architecture, the artist programmed sequences through his custom-designed software to create abstract configurations of light. His programming both instructs the lights and allows for an element of chance. While it is possible that a pattern will repeat during a viewer’s experience, it is highly unlikely. Still, the eye will seek patterns in the motion, a perceptual effect of the hypnotic trailing lights.

 

Throughout the last four decades a growing number of artists have explored the use of light to frame and create spaces in the built environment.

 

 

 

source: supertightstuff.com

The Bauhaus #itsalldesign- A Major Bauhaus Retrospective on Show in Vitra Museum

 

The Vitra Design Museum in Weil am Rhein, Germany, is hosting a major exhibition with a comprehensive work of the Bauhaus art and design school, one of the most influential cultural institutions of the 20th century.  The show titled The Bauhaus #itsalldesign, covers a range of disciplines including design, architecture, art, film and photography.  Significant pieces by Wassily Kandinsky, Walter Gropius, Marianne Brandt, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and others, including pieces that have never been exhibited before can be seen in Vitra Museum by the end of February.  The exhibition is divided into four areas; the opening part examines the historical context of Bauhaus, following with little-known design items and the theme of space, with the focus on the individuals who contributed to the school’s design approach, and the last area explores communication including typography, film and photography.  The highlights of the show are Walter Gropius’ 1919 Manifesto, a Ludwig Mies van der Rohe armchair with U-shaped metal arms, and Josef Albers’ 1923 Park stained glass panel.  Also, the show includes work of contemporary artists influenced by Bauhaus movement, including Konstantin Grcic’s Pipe table and chair, Opendesk’s Edie stool and Front Design’s Sketch furniture.

 

 

 

 

source: dezeen.com

The Creek Show in Austin, Texas

 

 

The Waller Creek in Austin, Texas,  is a 2.4 km waterway that used to flow trough the downtown practically invisible to the residents, moreover, with years, the creek faced pollution and periodic flooding. To turn the Waller Creek into an important downtown’s feature and the integral part of the city, the Waller Creek Conservancy launched the Creek Show in 2014, which is an annual program where a group of local architects, designers, and artists create temporary installations along the waterway.

 

The second edition of the Creek Show that took place from November 12-21, 2015, included five light-based installations each using light to create interactive experiences. One of the artists, Luke Savisky, created a project to vitalize a pedestrian underpass by setting up a system that allows passersby to interact with a camera, then distorting and projecting the images onto the vault of the underpass. Other projects included installations based on dynamic ecology, pollution, etc. Specht Harpman Architects created the installation called Volume, based on the fact that the creek draws the attention of the public only when the water level rises, and it becomes a flooding hazard. Architects created an installation where a gentle flow of water continuously falls from an 80-foot steel channel suspended above the creek. Lighting rakes the limestone wall behind and highlights the individual droplets falling in against it.

 

 

 

 

 

An artist and a professor makes a mirror out of penguins

 

Daniel Rozin, an artist and a NYU professor who uses mirror as the main theme in his work, has recently presented a new exhibition starring robotic penguins.

 

The installation “Penguins mirror” is on display at New York’s bitforms gallery until July 1, featuring 450 penguin plush robots scattered on the floor that move and rotate in a harmonized choreography  to mirror visitor’s posture.

 

While art usually displays its content, Rozin highlights that he enjoys  delivering content in the form of visitor’s perception and interaction.

 

The robotic penguin toys are black on one side and white on the other. Each toy is attached to the base that allows the penguin to rotate. A video camera brings a visual information to a central processing unit, which makes penguins turn in real-time, mirroring the visitor’s outline in black and white.

 

Rozin explains why he decided to use a penguin as a mirror: “Penguins are black and white, making them an inevitable pixel candidate. They huddle in groups. They are birds that don’t fly but they swim very gracefully, in the Penguins Mirror I programmed some transformation animations that resemble flocking of birds and schooling of fish. Perhaps these penguins are dreaming of flying.”

 

The exhibit is a part of a mirror installation “Descent with Modification” that features six  “mirrors”, inspired by Charles Darwin’s writing on evolutionary biology.

 

 

 

sources: vimeopro.com, designprojects.com

The Banana Show by Studio Job

 

Samuel Vanhoegaerden’s Gallery in the town of Knokke, Belgium, is currently hosting a Banana Show, series of lamps shaped like peeled bananas by Studio Job, whose founders Job Smeets and Nynke Tynagel,  are well known by unconventional  design.

 

The collection comes in limited edition and features seven different lights shaped like the famous fruit in various sizes and positions. Lamps are made of polished bronze, mouth-blown glass and each one contain a LED light inside.

 

“Bananas are the most popular fruit in the world… a nice reference to the other icons of the Pop Art, the Marilyns, the Campbell’s Soups, the Dollars signs, Coca-Cola… Distilling the beauty out of the popular is an art form itself” – said a statement from the gallery, which also cited former artist-in-residence Keith Haring as a reference for the exhibition.

 

 

 

source: dezeen.com

la Rinascente – WinterWonder

 

Stretching across the eight windows at their flagship location in Milan, the la Rinascente department store celebrated the holidays with an artistic installation by German artist and designer Moritz Waldemeyer.

 
Waldemeyer transformed the exterior of the retail structure into an billowing sea of 1,300 laser cut forex snowflakes dubbed ‘WinterWonder.’ The conceptualization of ‘WinterWonder’ became a manufacturable artwork, taking flight through the capacious column-way as a mighty whirling vortex.

 
The ceiling of the portico is met with a parametric expanse of curved and painted iron pipes on which varying shapes of crystallized forms are fitted. Changing their hue depending on the position of the viewer, the flakes convey a dynamic esthetic for passers-by of the popular locale.

 
‘WinterWonder’ also involves the public in an experience of augmented reality. By aiming a smartphone at a marker on the one of the store windows, a cyclone of shapes springs to life, surrounding people or objects in a colorful sea of snowflakes.

 

 

via: http://www.waldemeyer.com/
Video stream: https://vimeo.com/81378570