LuxeLife

Off-balanced and wonderfully surreal

 

London-based Child Studio, which was set up by Chieh Huang and Alexey Kostikov earlier this year, designed the lamps to appear “as if frozen in time.” Shown at the recent Milan design week, the lights appear to have been caught in the middle of sliding or rolling down wooden plinths of various shapes and sizes.

 

According to the designers, the lighting references the surrealist paintings of Giorgio de Chirico. “The ambiguous scale and striking silhouettes of the pieces give them an architectural quality,” said the studio. “The project invites the viewer to pause and to reflect on their perception of time within the physical environment.”

 

The pair used colored and lacquered ash wood for the lights’ bases, which include sloping circular plinths and scoop-shaped supports that the lamps appear to be rolling into. Each base features a different finish, with some revealing the underlying grain of the wood and others polished to a high gloss.

 

“It was important for us to find an authentic and interesting way to present our work in Milan as the design week is dominated by big brands,” they explained. “It is getting hard for independent designers to participate and show their work so it was essential we found somewhere unique.”

 

 

source: dezeen

Harpa Light Organ

 

As part of the Sónar Festival Reykjavík, Reactify collaborated with Atli Bollason, Owen Hindley and Jonas Johansson to create a light organ that allowed people to ‘play’ the lights on the side of the Harpa Concert Hall.

 

Building on Hindley and Bollason’s work from previous years where they allowed people to play Harpa Pong, and featuring the animation work of many other talented visual artists, the light organ was the latest addition to the repertoire of how people can interact with the look and feel of this beautiful building at the heart of Reykjavik’s culture.

 

source: reactifymusic

NASA researches LEDs

 

NASA has researched the advantages of LED lighting systems within the spacecraft environment. The Solid-State Lighting Module (SSLM) is designed to replace a General Luminaire Assembly (GLA) unit on the International Space Station (ISS). Identical to the GLA in fit and form, the SSLM temporarily replaced a GLA on ISS. The crew was asked to complete a brief evaluation regarding the quality of the light output and the usefulness of the dimming feature. The SSLM measures 26.5″ x 6.6″ x 3.9″ and has a mass of approximately 7.5 pounds.

 

Three ground-based studies were completed on visual performance, color discrimination, and melatonin (melatonin promotes sleepiness) suppression in healthy human subjects under different SSLA light exposure conditions inside a high-fidelity replica of the ISS crew quarters (CQ). Color discrimination tests showed no significant differences in color discrimination for indirect daylight, fluorescent room light, and SSLA light in the CQ. Also, there were no significant differences in score or time for subjects performing contrast tests. Presently, the data demonstrate that bright white Solid-State Lighting Module-Research (SSLM-R) light supports visual performance and color discrimination equivalently to typical indoor exposures to indirect daylight and overhead fluorescent light. In addition, increasing exposures to SSLA inside the CQ elicit increasingly stronger melatonin suppressions in healthy volunteers. The findings demonstrate the feasibility of doing controlled studies on visual, neuroendocrine and circadian responses in a high fidelity replica of an ISS component.

 

Early studies represent a start towards quantifying the broader range of visual, biological and behavioral responses to light once the current fluorescent lighting system is replaced by solid-state lighting. The data reported here begin to address long-duration space exploration, and the rapid development of solid-state lighting that will ultimately revolutionize how our public facilities, work places and homes are illuminated in the coming decades. Similar to some of the astronauts, a significant portion of the global population suffers from chronic sleep loss or circadian-related disorders. By refining multipurpose lights for astronaut safety, health and well-being in spaceflight, the door is opened for new lighting strategies that can be evolved for use on Earth.

 

 

source: NASA

Selfies in El Paso

 

Architectural firm, AGENCY, recently built a temporary installation in El Paso, Texas that explored the phenomenon of Selfies and the privacy issues related to these photos. According to AGENCY, selfies are a resource for third-party data-crunchers who use facial and pattern recognition software to extract identity and mood. Metadata is embedded in the photo file, social network post protocols, mobile device settings, and user-generated content, jeopardizing every selfie-taker’s individual data privacy.

 

SELFIE WALL created a range of lighting conditions day and night, offering a dynamic and interactive space for self-photography. The wall was built from 162 custom-fabricated units, CNC-milled from composite aluminum panel, and folded to shape different apertures for bouncing, scattering, and collecting light. A grid of LED lights was inset to provide zones of different color temperatures at night. A range of warm color temperatures, flattering to skin tones lined the inner surface of the space, while a range of cool whites provided a more accurate color rendering on the outer surface.

 

 

 

source: agencyarchitecture

Every Refrigerator Tells a Story

 

Crowded with notes, photos, memories, souvenirs and magnets; every refrigerator tells a story. The latest exhibition at Center for Architecture Sarasota (CFAS), Human Tales on Refrigerator Doors, Sweet Sparkman Architects and the master students of UF CityLab-Sarasota finally give the refrigerator door the spotlight it deserves.

 

Featuring seven vintage doors in the show, the architects and students celebrated not only the natural geography of Florida, but the architectural history and traditions singular to the area and placed aspiring architectural students into the built environment to work with seasoned professionals.

 

 

sources: CFAS, srqmagazine, sarasotamagazine

Dramatic Projection Display at Chicago’s Merchandise Mart

 

The Merchandise Mart, one of Chicago’s most important landmarks, will soon become a magnificent visual display that lights up a major portion of the downtown area.

 

In 2018, a massive projection screen will display images and videos across the entire expanse of the Mart’s riverfront side. The idea was first proposed in 2014 by Mayor Emanuel’s team and the tourism bureau of Chicago.

 

Construction on the Merchandise Mart was completed in 1930, and it was once the largest building in the world at the time it was erected. Known for its iconic art deco style, the Mart houses floors and floors of space for art galleries, special exhibitions, and vendors.

 

This plan is one of many in the downtown area to increase tourism with creative urban planning, recreational space, and public art. The unique display might liken Chicago to cities like Paris or Las Vegas that are known for their massive displays. The privately-funded project at the Merchandise Mart might be the first of a handful of buildings in the city that might be used for visual projections.

 

source: urbanmatter

Beijing is Getting the World’s Tallest Atrium

 

Currently under construction in Beijing is a 46 story tower , the Leeza Soho.  The structure is within the Lize Financial District and will be well connected to the city with its location above a subway interchange station.  Zaha Hadid Architects write: “As the tower rises, the diagonal axis through the site defined by the subway tunnel is re-aligned by ‘twisting’ the atrium through 45 degrees to orientate the atrium’s higher floors with the east-west axis of Lize Road, one of west Beijing’s primary avenues.”

 

The twist in the atrium allows natural light to penetrate into the center of all the floors and allows for a diversity of views into the city from all directions. The tower is on track for completion in 2018.

 

 

 

source: inhabitat

Artists of Light in Chandannagar

 

 

Once a French colony, Chandannagar now is a thriving French language and cultural hub in eastern India. The town is known for it’s celebration of Jagadhatri Puja, ‘the Protector of the World’ who is an aspect of the Hindu goddess Durga, particularly worshipped in the West Bengal region of India. Jagaddhatri is depicted as being the colour of the morning sun, three-eyed and four-armed, holding a chakra, conch, bow and arrows, clothed in red, bright jewels and nagajangopaveeta (a serpent as the sacred thread), a symbol of yoga and the Brahman. She rides a lion standing on the dead Karindrasura, the Elephant Demon.

 

The beginning of this five-day festival in Chandannagar is still unchronicled but it is generally believed to have been introduced in the late 18th century by a local zamindar. When electricity came to Chandannagar experiments with lights began. The creative lighting was originally meant for decorating the festival’s venues, but has taken on a life of its own.

 

At the forefront of the innovative displays are artists like Kashinath Neogy. In 2005, Neogy took a tough decision to introduce LED lights, much to the criticism of his colleagues, to cut down on high power consumption. They preferred the age-old practice of using tiny bulbs that made up a single unit wrapped in colored paper by hand. He created a giant dragon with 180000 LED lights, 30 feet long and 12 feet high. Today, usage of LEDs is a standard practice for lighting artists at the festival.

 

 

source: tribuneindia, wikipedia

Texting Colors Warm Up Boston’s Winter

 

“Color Commons,” created by New American Public Art, is a series of 24-foot “light blades” lining Boston’s Wharf District parks. When someone sends a text, the server sends the message to the microcontroller. Whether it’s a color or the ciphered message, the microcontroller translates the text to a trigger code which changes the colors of the Light Blades.

 

By activating Color Commons, New American Public Art and The Rose Kennedy Greenway Conservancy hope to make Boston a more playable city, one where existing urban infrastructure can be reused in ways that enhance person-to-city and person-to-person connections. In 2016, The Greenway made a commitment to playability through their hire of a full-time Play Coordinator. Both groups hope to continue their collaborations to put Boston on the map of cities across the globe that have joined the movement to make their urban spaces more playable. Color Commons will be on display through Winter 2017.

 

 

 

source: newamericanpublicart

DPA Lighting – Illuminated Beauty for Mike Stoane Lighting Event

 

 

German designers Tommaso Gimigliano and Ingo Kalecinski of dpalighting won kudos for their entry in Mike Stoane’s Lighting ‘Park Event’. The annual London based event challenges design teams to use a box of mystery components – and their imagination – to create an illuminated object or fixture.

 
Using the available items including LED modules, Gimigliano and Kalecinski were able to create a battery-operated ‘wearable aura’ of light, bringing fashion and illumination together. The team designed their creation ‘The NeckLED’ to instill wellbeing and define the boundaries of a personal micro-cosmos of warmth and comfort.