LuxeLife

Build your own miniature Frank Lloyd Wright building

 

 

 

Here’s your chance to build Frank Lloyd Wright’s Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum with your own hands—in miniature, that is. Thanks to Lego, which released an adorable model of the architectural wonder earlier this spring, Wright fans and building enthusiasts alike can assemble a tiny version of the iconic New York institution out of 744 plastic pieces specially designed to capture its curves.

 

The model also includes an adjoining tan office tower that was part of Wright’s original design but wasn’t built until 1992. Arch and bow bricks make up the swooping lines of the main rotunda and the rounded edges of the base. Even the porthole side windows are represented, as well as little taxis—rendered as two yellow bricks each—and other street details.

 

 

sources: lego, curbed

Airbus’ New Custom-Cabin Mood Lighting

 

 

 

Airbus has announced the new A320 will be armed with the latest technology. Some of the enhanced elements of the new interior include:

 

  • Iconic Ceiling Lighting: Featuring a fully customized on-board luminary experience, that begins at the entrance with a welcoming ambiance and continues throughout the aircraft with variable lighting features.

 

  • Colored LED Lighting: Leveraging 16.4 million color options, the new custom-cabin mood lighting creates a personalized in-flight experience at 30,000 feet throughout the cabin.

 

  • The Largest Overhead Storage Compartment (OHSC) in its Class: Called the “Airspace Bin”, it not only allows eight, instead of five bags, per four-frame bin, but also accommodates bigger and heavier bags stowed vertically.

 

  • New Sidewall Panels with Increased Cabin Width: One more inch at shoulder level for extra personal space.

 

  • New Window Bezel: The new fully-integrated window shades provide passengers more window space and unobstructed view, evoking the feel of the A350.

 

  • New Lavatory Design: The new spacious design also features colored mood lighting, along with anti-bacterial coatings, automatic aroma dispenser, sound and optional touchless options.

 

  • Harmonized Door Surround: The new lines of the frames match the Airspace design of the A350 XWB and the A330neo.

 

Additional features such as the less obtrusive cabin sidewall panels and lavatory options (‘Smart-Lav’ and ‘Space-Flex’) maintain a consistent design to the popular Airspace wide-body series. Passengers will also appreciate the modular IFE platform with overhead video and in-seat audio/video on-demand, as well as the provision for in-seat power, wireless flexible connectivity and mobile telephony (GSM on board). The full Airspace Interior package is targeted for 2020 and will retrofit to the current hardware.

 

 

source: airbus

Mercedes-Benz is developing new “Digital Light”

 

At the moment, laser lighting seems to be the new fad. Both BMW and Audi have sold cars with laser headlights in Europe. The laser headlight technology, in a nutshell, is comprised of a laser that fires into a filament, which in turn creates ultra bright light, brighter than any LED headlight. Mercedes-Benz is developing a new style of lighting, called “Digital Light.”

 

While the details of the new “Digital Light” tech are still minimal, as Mercedes-Benz is still in the process of development, it is a fascinating sounding technology. Essentially, the Digital headlights use more than one million “micromirrors” per headlight with four light points each. Each light point is comprised of 1024 individual actuatable LED chips, giving the car a total of 8192 LED lights.

 

The idea behind this isn’t necessarily the brightness or the distance of the light, but the ability to shine light exactly where it’s needed and not where it isn’t. With that many individual lights, the Digital Lights can create illumination in exact places and even exact shapes.

 

In fact, Mercedes is capable of creating specific images on the road ahead with the lights. So if there’s roadwork ahead, the lights will shine a roadwork sign ahead on the road, as well as surrounding illumination, to alert the driver. If a pedestrian is crossing the street and the systems on board recognize it, the lights will display zebra lines across the street to warn the driver.

 

It’s a very interesting lighting innovation and, based on the Germans’ penchant for copy-catting other German brands, we can see both BMW and Audi looking into something similar.

 

 

source: bmwblog

Auckland Harbour Bridge set to be illuminated


The Auckland Harbour Bridge will be set in lights in a bold plan poised to transform the city’s skyline and create a global attraction. The $10 million project will see the bridge illuminated with lights powered by solar energy. It is believed to be the first major bridge in the world to have all its lighting powered entirely by solar power from 630 panels installed on top of North Wharf in Wynyard Quarter.

 

The bridge will join world monuments like the Sydney Opera House, Eiffel Tower, Empire State Building and Dubai’s Burj Khalifa skyscraper, which all light up in customized displays. Often the lights are set to match a holiday or in solidarity of a tragic event.

 

Every light – using half the energy of standard lighting – will be individually controlled, allowing colors to change. The planning, consenting and installation of nearly 90,000 LED lights and 200 floodlights is expected to take several months. It is hoped the lights will be turned on before the end of 2017.

 

Lighting the bridge represents the next phase of a 10-year partnership between Vector and Auckland Council. The New Zealand Transport Agency, which manages the bridge infrastructure, says it is pleased to support the project. “The bridge has been an integral part of the city since it was built more than 50 years ago and we’re delighted to be using sustainable resources to bring it to life at night,” says NZTA chief executive Fergus Gammie.

 

 The bridge under construction in 1958

The bridge north-west from the Sky Tower

 

sources: wikipedia, nzherald

The Inaugural Toronto Light Festival

 

The inaugural Toronto Light Festival officially launched on January 27th at the Distillery District in downtown Toronto and ran until March 12th. The event featured 21 light-based installations by both local and international artists that were located both inside and outside of the Distillery’s buildings.

 

The idea behind the event is to not only showcase local and international artists, but to provide entertainment and inspiration to locals by pulling them out of their winter hibernation during the cold months and onto the streets to enjoy the sights.

 

 

 

 

sources: blogto, torontoguardian

Off-balanced and wonderfully surreal

 

London-based Child Studio, which was set up by Chieh Huang and Alexey Kostikov earlier this year, designed the lamps to appear “as if frozen in time.” Shown at the recent Milan design week, the lights appear to have been caught in the middle of sliding or rolling down wooden plinths of various shapes and sizes.

 

According to the designers, the lighting references the surrealist paintings of Giorgio de Chirico. “The ambiguous scale and striking silhouettes of the pieces give them an architectural quality,” said the studio. “The project invites the viewer to pause and to reflect on their perception of time within the physical environment.”

 

The pair used colored and lacquered ash wood for the lights’ bases, which include sloping circular plinths and scoop-shaped supports that the lamps appear to be rolling into. Each base features a different finish, with some revealing the underlying grain of the wood and others polished to a high gloss.

 

“It was important for us to find an authentic and interesting way to present our work in Milan as the design week is dominated by big brands,” they explained. “It is getting hard for independent designers to participate and show their work so it was essential we found somewhere unique.”

 

 

source: dezeen

Harpa Light Organ

 

As part of the Sónar Festival Reykjavík, Reactify collaborated with Atli Bollason, Owen Hindley and Jonas Johansson to create a light organ that allowed people to ‘play’ the lights on the side of the Harpa Concert Hall.

 

Building on Hindley and Bollason’s work from previous years where they allowed people to play Harpa Pong, and featuring the animation work of many other talented visual artists, the light organ was the latest addition to the repertoire of how people can interact with the look and feel of this beautiful building at the heart of Reykjavik’s culture.

 

source: reactifymusic

Lighting Inspired by a Water Well

 

With the inspiration of a water well, Stefan Nosko of the Academy of Fine Arts and Design, created the unique, mood-setting ‘Well Light.’ It takes a simple oiled Maple wood with brass elements as the handle and attaches to that a woven textile cable. Attached to the cable is a bulb socket which is made from brass allowing the light to be easily lowered and lifted into the blown glass container.

 

When the rope is lowered into the glass, the light radiates a soothing darker glow due to the coloring of the glass container at the bottom – either matted or blue. When the bulb is raised, it radiates light more clearly, brightening the surroundings. The entire process of controlling the lightning, just like lowering and raising the water bucket into the well, is soothing in and of itself.

 

 

 

source: yankodesign

Circuit Marker – Drawing Magic

 

Japanese infrastructure company Kandenko, who is involved in many fields including electrical and telecommunication, has a fun video featuring an AgIC pen, which allows you to draw ink that instantly conducts electricity over paper. The circuit marker has silver-based conductive ink that dries and becomes conductive immediately on circuit paper – allowing you to draw your own circuit and turn LEDs or motors on. The charming artistic appeal of the pen is illustrated in all its magical glory in this short promotional video called, “Future with bright lights.”

 

 

source: agic.cc

 

NASA researches LEDs

 

NASA has researched the advantages of LED lighting systems within the spacecraft environment. The Solid-State Lighting Module (SSLM) is designed to replace a General Luminaire Assembly (GLA) unit on the International Space Station (ISS). Identical to the GLA in fit and form, the SSLM temporarily replaced a GLA on ISS. The crew was asked to complete a brief evaluation regarding the quality of the light output and the usefulness of the dimming feature. The SSLM measures 26.5″ x 6.6″ x 3.9″ and has a mass of approximately 7.5 pounds.

 

Three ground-based studies were completed on visual performance, color discrimination, and melatonin (melatonin promotes sleepiness) suppression in healthy human subjects under different SSLA light exposure conditions inside a high-fidelity replica of the ISS crew quarters (CQ). Color discrimination tests showed no significant differences in color discrimination for indirect daylight, fluorescent room light, and SSLA light in the CQ. Also, there were no significant differences in score or time for subjects performing contrast tests. Presently, the data demonstrate that bright white Solid-State Lighting Module-Research (SSLM-R) light supports visual performance and color discrimination equivalently to typical indoor exposures to indirect daylight and overhead fluorescent light. In addition, increasing exposures to SSLA inside the CQ elicit increasingly stronger melatonin suppressions in healthy volunteers. The findings demonstrate the feasibility of doing controlled studies on visual, neuroendocrine and circadian responses in a high fidelity replica of an ISS component.

 

Early studies represent a start towards quantifying the broader range of visual, biological and behavioral responses to light once the current fluorescent lighting system is replaced by solid-state lighting. The data reported here begin to address long-duration space exploration, and the rapid development of solid-state lighting that will ultimately revolutionize how our public facilities, work places and homes are illuminated in the coming decades. Similar to some of the astronauts, a significant portion of the global population suffers from chronic sleep loss or circadian-related disorders. By refining multipurpose lights for astronaut safety, health and well-being in spaceflight, the door is opened for new lighting strategies that can be evolved for use on Earth.

 

 

source: NASA