LuxeLife

The Fascinating Sculpture of Rachel Whiteread

 

 

London’s Tate Museum is celebrating over 25 years of Rachel Whiteread’s internationally acclaimed sculpture. The show tracks Whiteread’s career and brings together well-known works such as Untitled (100 Spaces) 1995 and Untitled (Staircase) 2001 alongside new pieces that have never been previously exhibited.

 

 

One of Britain’s leading contemporary artists, Whiteread uses industrial materials such as plaster, concrete, resin, rubber and metal to cast everyday objects and architectural space. Her evocative sculptures range from the intimate to the monumental. Born in London in 1963, Whiteread was the first woman to win the Turner Prize in 1993. The same year she made House 1993–1994, a life-sized cast of the interior of a condemned terraced house in London’s East End, which existed for a few months before it was controversially demolished.

 

 

On the lawn outside Tate Britain a new concrete sculpture, Chicken Shed 2017, will sit during the exhibition. The exhibition runs now through January 21, 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sources: tate, wikipedia

 

The Art of Black Rock City

 

Burning Man is an annual gathering in the western United States at Black Rock City—a temporary city erected in the Black Rock Desert of northwest Nevada, approximately one hundred miles (160 km) north-northeast of Reno. The late summer event is described as an experiment in community and art, influenced by ten main principles: “radical” inclusion, self-reliance, and self-expression, as well as community cooperation, civic responsibility, gifting, decommodification, participation, immediacy, and leaving no trace.

 

The art of Black Rock City takes many forms, from cutting-edge musical performances to mighty mutant vehicles. Attendees experience light art, performance art, wearable art, and zany interactive experiences. But perhaps most famous are the iconic large installations that grace Burning Man’s expansive playa. Each year veterans and newbies alike eagerly await the massive landmarks that rise out of the massive and ancient lakebed. Towering monoliths emerge from dust storms like stalwart sentinels and transform entirely from day to night. They play host to art car parties, weddings, photo shoots and introspection. In harmony with the annual theme, they give the city a unique flavor every year.

 

At Burning Man, the community explores various forms of artistic self-expression, created in celebration for the pleasure of all participants. Participation is a key precept for the community – selfless giving of one’s unique talents for the enjoyment of all is encouraged and actively reinforced. Some of these generous outpourings of creativity can include experimental and interactive sculpture, building, performance, and art cars among other media, often inspired by the yearly theme, chosen by organizers.

 

First held 31 years ago in 1986 on Baker Beach in San Francisco as a small function organized by Larry Harvey and a group of friends, it has since been held annually, spanning from the last Sunday in August to the first Monday in September (Labor Day). Burning Man 2017 was held from August 27 to September 4.

 

 

 

 

 

 

sources: wikipedia, everfest, newatlas

Pantone Presents Prince’s Purple

 

The Prince Estate, alongside Pantone Color Institute, recently announced the creation of a standardized custom color to represent and honor international icon, Prince. The purple hue, represented by his “Love Symbol #2” was inspired by his custom-made Yamaha purple piano, which was originally scheduled to go on tour with the performer before his untimely passing at the age of 57. The color pays tribute to Prince’s indelible mark on music, art, fashion and culture.

 

Prince’s association with the color purple was galvanized in 1984 with the release of the film Purple Rain, along with its Academy Award-winning soundtrack featuring the eponymous song. While the spectrum of the color purple will still be used in respect to the “Purple One,” Love Symbol #2, will be the official color across the brand he left behind.

 

The ‘Purple One’ made a statement and challenged cultural norms through both his well-known music and personal style. In addition to the Oscar, Prince won seven Grammy Awards and a Golden Globe Award for Purple Rain. Both “Purple Rain” and “1999” were entered into the Grammy Hall of Fame, and Prince was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2004, the very first year he was eligible.

 

Laurie Pressman, Vice President of the Pantone Color Institute said: “We are honored to have worked on the development of Love Symbol #2, a distinctive new purple shade created in memory of Prince, ‘the purple one.’ A musical icon known for his artistic brilliance, Love Symbol #2 is emblematic of Prince’s distinctive style. Long associated with the purple family, Love Symbol #2 enables Prince’s unique purple shade to be consistently replicated and maintain the same iconic status as the man himself.”

 

sources: pantone, wikimedia

Thousands of Rome’s historical images digitized

 

A team including Stanford researchers digitized thousands of pieces from 19th-century archaeologist Rodolfo Lanciani’s collection to help scholars across the world study Rome’s transformation over the centuries.

 

The exhibit, which recently went online, consists of almost 4,000 digitized drawings, prints, photographs and sketches of historic Rome from the 16th to 20th centuries. The pieces were collected by renowned Roman archaeologist Rodolfo Lanciani, who sought to document the entire history of Rome’s archeology up to the end of the 19th century.

 

After Lanciani’s death in 1929, his library, which contains more than 21,000 items, was sold to the Istituto Nazionale di Archeologia e Storia dell’Arte (Italy’s National Institute of Archaeology and Art History) in Rome. Before now, reviewing the archive was much more difficult. It required a visit to the historic 15th-century Palazzo Venezia in central Rome. Lanciani’s collection is on the fourth floor and in its own dedicated room, which is open for only a few hours during weekdays. Only one folder from the collection can be viewed at a time.

 

Supported by a 2015 grant from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, the team partnered with Italy’s Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities and Tourism and the National Institute to scan and create high-resolution images of each of the thousands of materials in the collection. Each digital object was categorized and tied to a descriptive set of data, so it could be properly stored and searched online. The digital images and all associated descriptions are now permanently preserved in the Stanford Digital Repository.

 

 

 

 

 

source: stanford

Niagara Upgrades to LED

 

The nighttime illumination of Niagara Falls recently unveiled LED lighting upgrade that replaces a 20-year-old halogen system.

 

As noted by the Niagara Falls Illumination Board, the LED enhancement — price tag: $4 million or about $3.1 million USD — will reduce related energy costs by as much as 60 percent (the new lights consume 52 killowatts of energy compared to the 126 kW used by the halogens) while illuminating the falls with a vastly larger spectrum of colors that are noticeably richer and more robust. As for the intensity and quality of the kaleidoscopic light itself, the LED luminaires shine anywhere from three to 14 times brighter than their incandescent predecessors depending on the color being projected. Compared to the previous bulbs, which sported a 1,900-hour lifespan, the LEDs will shine bright for up to 25 years.

 

The new lighting system will consist of 1400 individual luminaires broken into 350 zones of control across both falls. Each individual control zone is equipped with separate Red, Green, Blue and White LED luminaires (RGBW). When used together these separate colored RGBW luminaires will mix on the falls to create endless color combinations. The use of White LED’s in the color mixing scheme will allow one to move between deeply saturated colors to subtle hues of color to allow for more natural looking effects.

 

Over 185,000 feet of conductors will connect the 1400 individual luminaires to five 10 feet tall racks of individually addressed controllable drivers. The remote mounted drivers are indoors and easily accessible reducing the need for servicing drivers that would otherwise be internal to the luminaires out in the field.

 

 

sources: mnn, wikipedia

What is the floor saying today?

 

Philips Lighting and Tarkett recently introduced the launch of Luminous vinyl flooring. The vinyl tiles are embedded with cutting-edge LED technology that enables retailers to advertise, interact with customers and guide them through any store or building. The expressive flooring, principally aimed at retail and hospitality environments, enables the broadcast of luminous messages, animations and adverts on the vinyl floor to provide unique customer experiences and help drive sales.

 

“Increasingly light is being embedded into floors, walls and ceilings. This latest innovation with Tarkett extends this trend and offers new ways to engage shoppers, visitors and employees. Light can be used to welcome and guide people, alert them to special offers and even advertise to them. When connected to the web all kind of dynamic real-time information can be displayed and remote access allows the retailer to program multiple branches,” says Dr. Bernd Voelpel, General Manager Luminous at Philips Lighting.

 

 

 

 

source: philips

Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirror Rooms on Tour

 

Yayoi Kusama is one of Japan’s most important contemporary artists. Her legendary 65-year career of multi-reflective installations, paintings, sculptures, drawings has left people in awe.

 

In 1965, Kusama began utilizing mirrors to transcend the physical limitations of her own productivity and achieve the repetition that is crucial to her paintings and Accumulations. Sculptural, architectural, and performative, these installations blur the line between artistic disciplines and create a participatory experience by casting the visitor as the subject of the work.

 

Focusing on the evolution of her immersive “Infinity Mirror Rooms,” the most significant North American tour of Kusama’s work in nearly two decades began at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden (23 February – 14 May 2017) before travelling to its current home … Seattle Art Museum (30 June – 10 September 2017), Followed by The Broad in Los Angeles (October 2017 – January 2018), Art Gallery of Ontario (March – May 2018) and the Cleveland Museum of Art (July – October 2018).

 

 

 

 

 

 

sources: seattleartmuseum, yayoi-kusama

 

A Garden Sphere That Feeds A Neighborhood

 

Space10, an Ikea lab for futuristic, solutions-oriented designs, recently released open source plans for The Growroom, a large, multi-tiered spherical garden designed to sustainably grow enough food for an entire neighborhood. The Growroom was designed by Space10 and architects Sine Lindholm and Mads-Ulrik Husum.

 

From Taipei to Helsinki and from Rio de Janeiro to San Francisco, the original version of The Growroom sparked interest and people requested to either buy or exhibit The Growroom. But it didn’t make sense to promote local food production and then start shipping it across oceans and continents. That is why Space10 released The Growroom as open source design and encourage people to build their own locally as a way to bring new opportunities to life. Standing tall as a spherical garden, it empowers people to grow their own food much more locally in a beautiful and sustainable way.

 

Digital fabrication has made state-of-the-art factory tools accessible for ordinary people. A new generation of technologies such as 3D additive and subtractive manufacturing to laser cutting and surface-mount manufacture is available to the public in fab labs and maker spaces in any major city.

 

This mean most people — in theory — could produce almost anything themselves. Just as printers are now ubiquitous; local and on-demand, customized production could become the norm of the future. All you then need to build it, is two rubber hammers, 17 sheets of ply wood and a visit to your local fab lab or maker space with a CNC milling machine. The design focuses on making the assembly easy and intuitive for anyone to handle, and The Growroom is produced from only one material, making it accessible and affordable for most communities.

 

 

source: Space10

Hungary’s Zsolany Light Festival

 

Modern lighting artists did not disappoint at the recent three-day 2017 Zsolnay Light Festival in Pécs, Hungary. Flying airfields over 30 meters high above Széchenyi Square, impressive spectacle of light works at 26 locations attracted 60,000 visitors. The most exciting elements of the festival included 21st century mapping art, theatres, street entertainment, theatre, music and contemporary circus.

 

The winner of the Zsolnay Light Art 3D mapping competition was Ricardo Cancado from Spain with his work “Sacred Geometry.”

source: rollinginbudapest

Pantone’s Colors of 2018

 

Pantone Home + Interiors 2018 Pantone Color Institute Executive Director Leatrice Eiseman recently shared color and design trends for 2018 at the International Home + Housewares Show.

 

Eiseman studies fashion runways, the art scene, television, movies, architecture, retail, theater, food and consumer goods all over the world, tracking what hues are in, what’s out and what can be used in unique combinations to catch consumers’ eyes.

 

Among the design trends Eiseman highlighted are: our fascination with letters and words as a design element, the use of triangles in both contemporary and retro themes, dimensional diamonds and intricacy, which is likely spurred by the explosion of 3-D printing. Wood treatments have also become “very unique and really artful,” she said. And in a throwback to the 1970s, fringe is “very hot and very strong.”

 

As for general color trends or treatments, “Metallics we know are classic,” Eiseman said. “But they have really moved over into neutrals.” She also sees a continued fascination with iridescents – “The human eye can absolutely not avoid” anything iridescent, pearlized or translucent, she added.

 

Eiseman also cited a movement to more exotic or intense colors, which is a contrast to the popularity of pastels in the last few years – though those colors are not going away. “Intense colors seem to be a natural application of our intense lifestyles and thought processes these days,” she said.

 

The eight color groupings are:

 

Verdure – This palette features vegetal kinds of colors like Celery and Foliage being combined with berry-infused purples and an eggshell blue. “This palette is so symbolic of health,” said Eiseman, but it updates the profusion of greens with some bright and contrasting hues.

 

Resourceful Complementary colors on the color wheel – oranges and blues – are combined in this palette that is clever and “resourceful” in re-using and re-furbishing what consumers may already own. “This is quite an interesting color combination. It combines warm and cool tones that you just can’t avoid looking at it.”

 

Playful Speaking to our need for whimsy, the Playful palette is out-of-the ordinary and quirky. The colors are “bright-hearted more than light-hearted” with names to match, like Minion Yellow, Lime Popsicle, Green Flash and adventurous blue Skydiver.

 

Discretion – Low-key and subtle, Discretion is the opposite of Playful. Nostalgic hues such as Elderberry, Burnished Lilac and Hawthorne Rose combine with strengthening tones to offer newness to a subtle palette.

 

Far-fetched – This palette “reaches out and embraces many different cultures,” said Eiseman. It refreshingly combines three popular rosy tones with Iced Coffee and Ruby Wine, as well as a few earthy tones such as Cornsilk yellow.

 

Intricacy – This palette reflects the popularity of intricate designs . It features the “new neutrals,” aka metallics, but a florid Holly Berry Red and yellow Sulfur add a layer of drama.

 

Intensity – Providing an eclectic mix of colors, Intensity conveys “a certain strength, power, depth and sophistication,” said Eiseman. Coolly composed shades of plum, blue and blue-green quell the fires of orange Emberglow, Molten Lava and Bossa Nova. Golds and black complete the palette.

 

TECH-nique – In a nod to the proliferation of technology, this palette features hues “that seem to shine from within.” Colors include a vibrant blue, green, fushia and purple, along with iridescent peacock tones in both turquoise and hot pink, which are offset by Brilliant White and Frosted Almond.

 

 

sources: homeaccentstoday, pantone