LuxeLife

Hockney & Van Gogh in Amsterdam

 

For the first time, the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam is bringing two greats together . . . David Hockney and Vincent Van Gogh. Hockney – Van Gogh: The Joy of Nature demonstrates the influence of Van Gogh on Hockney’s work, exploring both artists’ fascination with nature, their use of bright, contrasting colors and their experimentation with perspective.

 

The landscape paintings show clear links with Van Gogh’s landscapes, such as The Harvest (1888), Field with Irises near Arles (1888) and The Garden of Saint Paul’s Hospital (‘Leaf-Fall’) (1889). The stylized vertical lines of the tree trunks in the latter work by Van Gogh are analogous to the repetitive lines in Hockney’s renowned The Arrival of Spring in Woldgate, East Yorkshire in 2011.

 

A multimedia guide, created especially for the exhibition and featuring the voice of David Hockney, takes visitors through the exhibition. In a range of guided tours (available in six languages), museum guides introduce visitors to the links between Van Gogh and Hockney. The exhibition runs through May 26, 2019.

 

 

 

source: vangoghmuseum

Rockin’ the MET

 

For the first time, a major museum exhibition will examine the instruments of rock and roll at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Through more than 130 instruments dating from 1939 to 2017—Play It Loud: Instruments of Rock & Roll will explore one of the most influential artistic movements of the 20th century. Rock and roll’s seismic influence was felt across culture and society. Early rock musicians were attracted to the wail of the electric guitar and the distortion of early amplifiers, a sound that became forever associated with rock music and its defining voice. The instruments used in rock and roll had a profound impact on this art form that forever changed music.

 

“With its outstanding collection and comprehensive Department of Musical Instruments, The Met has for decades exhibited, celebrated, and contextualized the global artistic vision and extraordinary craftsmanship involved in developing musical instruments,” said Max Hollein, Director of the Museum. “Play It Loud celebrates a formative chapter in 20th-century art and culture, and the extraordinary objects featured in this presentation convey the innovation, experimentation, passion, and rebellion at the heart of rock and roll. The exhibition allows us to appreciate the artistry of the instruments as well as their powerful role in the creation and expression of rock’s legendary sound and identity.”

 

Organized thematically, Play It Loud will explore how musicians embraced and advanced emerging technologies; the phenomenon of the “Guitar Gods;” the crafting of a visual identity through the use of instruments; and the destruction of instruments in some live performances, one of rock’s most defining gestures. The exhibition will include many of rock’s most celebrated instruments, including such guitars as Jimi Hendrix’s electric guitar “Love Drops,” originally decorated by him; Eric Clapton’s “Blackie,” Eddie Van Halen’s “Frankenstein,” Jerry Garcia’s “Wolf,” and Joan Jett’s “Melody Maker,” and drums from Keith Moon’s “Pictures of Lily” drum set. By displaying several rigs used in live performances and sound recordings, the exhibition will also demonstrate how artists created their own individual sounds, and some 40 vintage posters, costumes, and performance videos will illustrate key components of the musical movement’s visual style and impact.

 

The exhibition is co-organized with the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and runs April 8 through October 1.

 

 

 

 

 

source: metmuseum

Color of the 1960s

 

New York’s Whitney Museum of American Art is set to open Spilling Over: Painting Color. The collection gathers paintings from the 1960s and early 1970s that inventively use bold, saturated, and even hallucinatory color to activate perception. During this period, many artists adopted acrylic paint—a newly available, plastic-based medium—and explored its expansive technical possibilities and wider range of hues. Color Field painters poured paint and stained unprimed canvas, dramatizing painting’s materiality and visual force. Painters associated with Op art deployed pattern, geometric arrangement, and intense color combinations. At the same historical moment, an emerging generation of artists explored color’s capacity to articulate new questions about perception, specifically its relation to race, gender, and the coding of space. The exhibition looks to the divergent ways color can be equally a formal problem and a political statement.

 

The title of the show is taken from a quote by Thompson, who shortly before his death in 1966 said, “I paint many paintings that tell me slowly that I have something inside of me that is just bursting, twisting, sticking, spilling over to get out. Out into souls and mouths and eyes that have never seen before.” Spilling Over: Painting Color demonstrates why and how painting could still matter for artists who wanted to see anew. The retrospective opens March 29 and runs through the summer.

 

 

 

source: whitney

Salvador Dali Returns

 

The Dali Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida is set to celebrate Salvador Dali’s art and legacy with “Dali Lives,” a groundbreaking experience to be unveiled in April 2019. Visitors to the museum will have the opportunity to learn more about Dali’s life and work from the person who knew him best: the artist himself. Using an artificial intelligence (AI)-based cutting edge technique, the new “Dali Lives” experience employs machine learning to create a version of Dali’s likeness, resulting in an uncanny resurrection of the mustached master. When the experience opens, visitors will for the first time be able to interact with an engaging lifelike Salvador Dali on a series of screens throughout the Museum.

 

“Dali was prophetic in many ways and understood his historical importance,” says Dr. Hank Hine, executive director at The Dali. “He wrote, If someday I may die, though it is unlikely, I hope the people in the cafes will say, ‘Dali has died, but not entirely.’ This technology lets visitors experience his bigger-than-life personality in addition to our unparalleled collection of his works.”

 

The Museum began this immersive project by collecting and sharing hundreds of interviews, quotes, and existing archival footage from the prolific artist. These extensive materials trained an AI algorithm to “learn” aspects of Dali’s face, then looked for an actor with the same general physical characteristics of Dali’s body. The AI then generates a version of Dali’s likeness to match the actor’s face and expressions. To educate visitors while engaging with “Dali Lives,” the Museum used authentic writings from Dali himself – coupled with dynamic present-day messages – reenacted by the actor.

 

 

 

 

 

source: thedali

Pop/Funk: Warhol & Frey

 

Tempe, Arizona’s ASU Art Museum is currently celebrating two influential artists of pop and funk art: Andy Warhol and Viola Frey. Both of these art rebels can be experienced together in Pop/Funk: Warhol & Frey, now exhibiting through March 23.

 

These two great counter-culture artists of the twentieth century grew out of the 1960’s on opposite coasts … Warhol on the east coast and Frey on the west coast. Both were really counter-cultural art movements that went against the norm. The majority of the work on display is actually in the ASU Art Museum’s permanent collection: Andy Warhol’s photographs and prints, and Viola Frey’s ceramics.

 

Andy Warhol elevated popular culture to high art status; similarly, Viola Frey helped elevate ceramics from being considered “craft” to fine art.

 

 

 

 

sources: asuartmuseum, statepress

The Electric Desert of Phoenix

 

Phoenix’s Desert Botanical Garden presents ‘Electric Desert,’ an electric psychedelic experiment in lights color, and sound … bringing a new experience to night-time viewing of the Arizona desert.

 

Created by video artist Ricardo Rivera and his Philadelphia-based Klip Collective, Rivera uses 3-D projection mapping to create animations that wrap around the cacti to create abstract animations. Founded in 2003, Klip Collective is an experiential video shop that uses virtual reality, projection mapping, storytelling and soundscapes to create captivating, immersive sensory experiences on behalf of institutions, corporate clients and cultural partners.

 

The installation runs now through May 2019.

 

 

source: desert botanical garden

Yelland’s California Landscapes

 

Sacramento’s Crocker Art is currently exhibiting Raymond Dabb Yelland: California Landscape Painter. This is the first exhibition in more than 50 years to celebrate the life and work of this important 19th-century artist. From Yelland’s arrival in Oakland in 1873 until his death in 1900, he rendered beautiful views of West Coast scenery, incorporating changing fashions of landscape art into paintings that retain credibility as depictions of real places.

 

Born in England in 1948, Yelland was esteemed both for his career as a landscape painter and for his dedication to teaching. The landscapes in this exhibition illustrate his transition from the Hudson River School style of painting, which focused on topographically recognizable scenes painted with meticulous, albeit enhanced, realism, to a more loosely painted, evocative aesthetic popularized by the French Barbizon painters. Many of the paintings in the exhibition glow in the gentle radiance of late afternoon or evening, showcasing Yelland’s keen ability to capture light. These landscapes in particular manifest the artist’s familiarity with Transcendentalist ideas and suggest the spirituality he believed was inherent to California nature.

 

Coast scenes were only one aspect of Yelland’s repertoire. His trips to Oregon and Yosemite inspired depictions of mountain scenery that competed with similar paintings by Thomas Hill and Albert Bierstadt. Although out of fashion in the eastern United States by 1880, paintings of grand subjects like these were still appreciated in California … and these years later this remains truer than ever. The exhibit is on view until January 27, 2019.

 

 

 

 

source: crockerart

Trove of Over 130,000 Warhol Photographic Exposures

 

Photographs by Andy Warhol that have never before been displayed publicly are at the heart of the exhibition Contact Warhol: Photography Without End, which draws on a trove of over 130,000 photographic exposures that Stanford University’s Cantor Arts Center acquired from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts in 2014. The collection of 3,600 contact sheets and corresponding negatives represent the complete range of Warhol’s black-and-white photographic practice from 1976 until his unexpected death in 1987.

 

The exhibition brings to life Warhol’s many interactions with the social and celebrity elite of his time with portraits of stars such as Michael Jackson, Liza Minnelli, and Dolly Parton; younger sensations in the art world such as Keith Haring and Jean-Michel Basquiat; and political stars, including Nancy Reagan, Maria Shriver, and Arnold Schwarzenegger. Contact Warhol, curated by Stanford Professors Richard Meyer and Peggy Phelan, traces Warhol’s photography from the most fundamental level of the contact sheet to the most fully developed silkscreen paintings. The collection is on display now through January 6, 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

source: stanford

Seattle’s BOREALIS, a festival of light

 

BOREALIS, a festival of light was a first-in-the US global competition and exhibition of technology and light art that took place each evening in Seattle from October 11-14, 2018. The festival featured a unique combination of live music, street art performance, lighting art installations, and multi-media video mapping designed to transform surrounding built environments of landmark buildings and facades into a virtual reality extravaganza – an urban canvas for unconventional storytelling by artists from around the globe.

 

From Seattle’s Lake Union Park, the selected video-mapping artists showcased their work on the architecturally unique Museum of History and Industry building, the festival extended south with approximately 25 light art installations.

 

During the event, attendees experienced the interactive light art displays, sampled food from participating food trucks, quenched their thirst at the festival beer and wine garden, and enjoyed live music.

 

 

 

 

 

 

source: borealisfestivaloflight

Warhol Auctioned on Blockchain

 

 

For the first time ever, a multi-million dollar tokenised artwork, Andy Warhol’s 14 Small Electric Chairs (1980), has been sold to qualified participants on Maecenas, an art investment platform built on blockchain, in the private beta launch of the platform. Facilitated in partnership with London-based Dadiani Syndicate, a fine art gallery, the cryptocurrency auction attracted over 800 sign-ups within weeks, several times the expected number.

 

It is the first time that a high-profile artwork from an internationally renowned artist has been tokenised and auctioned successfully using blockchain technology. The highest bid in the Dutch auction was US$6.5 million and more than 6 million ART tokens were used by the Ethereum smart contract during the auction. Maecenas was successful in achieving its main goal for this private beta launch, which was to validate the end-to-end process of the Dutch auction and artwork tokenisation using blockchain technology.

 

The buyers were a mix of sophisticated investors, crypto enthusiasts and fine art professionals. The participants were mostly from Europe and Asia. Marcelo García Casil, CEO of Maecenas, said “This is a historical moment, for us and for the blockchain community. We have achieved a significant milestone that marks the beginning of a new era. Tokenisation of assets is the most prominent and exciting use case of blockchain technology, and we’re proud to be pioneers in this space. This Warhol painting is the first of many more to come and we are looking forward to seeing and leading the financial revolution for the art market.”

 

Eleesa Dadiani, founder of Dadiani Syndicate, added “This auction was unchartered territory; a new model in an age-old market. The unprecedented demand, and speed with which the first fraction has been sold, has gone a long way to validating our vision of a more democratic and open art investment market.”

 

Maecenas tokenised 14 Small Electric Chairs by converting it into tamper-proof digital certificates or “fractions” based on the Ethereum network. Buyers then purchased fractions of 14 Small Electric Chairs with Bitcoin, Ether or the ART token, a cryptocurrency created for Maecenas. The auction was run entirely by a smart contract. The Maecenas blockchain gives buyers access to artworks that have been verified and are stored securely. Both the sale and subsequent trading of these certificates are tracked on a blockchain. Owners of the artwork fractions can sell their certificates to other buyers at any time via the Maecenas marketplace. The success of this auction makes a new progress from banks to cryptocurrencies that’ll lead a new way to invest in artwork, as Maecenas pursues its goal to democratise access to fine art.

 

14 Small Electric Chairs is part of Warhol’s 1980 Reversal series – a postmodern reworking of his iconic 1960s Death and Disaster Series. The artwork is certificated from the Andy Warhol Art Authentication Board in New York.

 

source: maecenas