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Salvador Dali Returns

 

The Dali Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida is set to celebrate Salvador Dali’s art and legacy with “Dali Lives,” a groundbreaking experience to be unveiled in April 2019. Visitors to the museum will have the opportunity to learn more about Dali’s life and work from the person who knew him best: the artist himself. Using an artificial intelligence (AI)-based cutting edge technique, the new “Dali Lives” experience employs machine learning to create a version of Dali’s likeness, resulting in an uncanny resurrection of the mustached master. When the experience opens, visitors will for the first time be able to interact with an engaging lifelike Salvador Dali on a series of screens throughout the Museum.

 

“Dali was prophetic in many ways and understood his historical importance,” says Dr. Hank Hine, executive director at The Dali. “He wrote, If someday I may die, though it is unlikely, I hope the people in the cafes will say, ‘Dali has died, but not entirely.’ This technology lets visitors experience his bigger-than-life personality in addition to our unparalleled collection of his works.”

 

The Museum began this immersive project by collecting and sharing hundreds of interviews, quotes, and existing archival footage from the prolific artist. These extensive materials trained an AI algorithm to “learn” aspects of Dali’s face, then looked for an actor with the same general physical characteristics of Dali’s body. The AI then generates a version of Dali’s likeness to match the actor’s face and expressions. To educate visitors while engaging with “Dali Lives,” the Museum used authentic writings from Dali himself – coupled with dynamic present-day messages – reenacted by the actor.

 

 

 

 

 

source: thedali

Student-Developed Moon Base

 

Angelus Chrysovalantis Alfatzis, an architectural engineering student at the National Technical University of Athens, Greece has gained attention for his idea for a moon base. He is one of several young researchers based at European Space Agency’s (ESA) astronaut center in Cologne, Germany, investigating Moon-related concepts as Europe prepares for future missions.

 

Alfatzis describes his architectural approach as “hyperlocal” and is drawn to extreme environments in remote places and believes that sourcing or producing materials on the Moon itself will be vital to building a sustainable lunar habitat – a view that ESA shares. “I always strive to find material and structural solutions in accordance with the resources available on-site,” he explains. “At the moment, my focus is on using unprocessed lunar soil for construction and the architectural applications of this. Our idea is to transport inflatable modules to the base of a small crater on the South Polar Region of the Moon, and then gradually fill the cavity with lunar soil, until the modules are effectively buried. Meters of shielding will protect those inside from radiation. Building inside a crater will also help insulate due to the stable temperature of the Moon’s underground environment and provides cover from the threat of micrometeoroids.”

 

Like construction on Earth, Angelus says the main purpose of lunar buildings will be to protect inhabitants from external conditions that could otherwise pose harm, and create a habitat that supports human life. But there are special considerations that must be factored into planning. Sunlight, changes in temperature, the type of terrain and the level of gravity all play a role in designing a suitable concept. Due to lack of a protective atmosphere or magnetic field, any lunar base must also protect its inhabitants from radiation and tiny meteorites that rain down overhead.

source: esa

World’s Largest Permanent Digital Art Projection

 

Chicago’s Art on theMART is the largest permanent digital art projection in the world, projecting contemporary artwork across the 2.5 acre river-façade of theMART. theMART (formerly The Merchandise Mart) is the largest privately held commercial building in the United States. It encompasses 4.2 million gross square feet, spans two city blocks, rises 25 stories, and is visited by an average of 30,000 people each business day.

 

Art on theMART’s projections are visible to the public from Wacker Dr. and along the Chicago Riverwalk two hours a night (7 – 9pm), five days a week (Wednesday – Sunday), for ten months of the year (March – December). The program content rotates every season.

 

Art on theMART launched its inaugural program on September 29, 2018, featuring commissioned works by four renowned contemporary artists, Zheng Chongbin, Jason Salavon, Diana Thater and Jan Tichy, with interstitial visuals by Obscura Digital, the creators of Art on theMART’s unique software and content display platform. “The inaugural program of Art on theMART was an invitation to artists and organizations from around the world to ideate what this platform can become,” said Art on theMART Executive Director Cynthia Noble. “We look forward to seeing what artists have envisioned for the 2019 program, and are thrilled to actualize many of those ideas and bring them to life on a grand, public scale.” The new season opens March 2019.

 

 

 

source: artonthemart

A Walking Car

 

Hyundai wowed the 2019 Consumer Electronics Show last week in Las Vegas with their new vehicle, “Elevate.” Like something out of Star Wars, wheels with robotic legs allow users to drive, walk or even climb over the most treacherous terrain.

 

In times of disaster, those first 72 hours are of upmost importance. Often the search-and-rescue missions are impeded due to the disaster . . . which led Hyundai to develop the first-ever vehicle with movable legs.

 

The design is capable of both mammalian and reptilian walking gaits, allowing it to move in any direction. The legs also fold up into a stowed drive-mode, where power to the joints is cut, and the use of an integrated passive suspension system maximizes battery efficiency. This allows Elevate to drive at highway speeds just like any other vehicle. But no other can climb a five foot wall, step over a five foot gap, walk over diverse terrain, and achieve a 15 foot wide track width, all while keeping its body and passengers completely level.

 

Design Manager, David Byron, offered a real-life scenario: “Imagine a car stranded in a snow ditch just 10 feet off the highway being able to walk or climb over the treacherous terrain, back to the road potentially saving its injured passengers – this is the future of vehicular mobility.”

 

 

 

source: hyundainews

Pop/Funk: Warhol & Frey

 

Tempe, Arizona’s ASU Art Museum is currently celebrating two influential artists of pop and funk art: Andy Warhol and Viola Frey. Both of these art rebels can be experienced together in Pop/Funk: Warhol & Frey, now exhibiting through March 23.

 

These two great counter-culture artists of the twentieth century grew out of the 1960’s on opposite coasts … Warhol on the east coast and Frey on the west coast. Both were really counter-cultural art movements that went against the norm. The majority of the work on display is actually in the ASU Art Museum’s permanent collection: Andy Warhol’s photographs and prints, and Viola Frey’s ceramics.

 

Andy Warhol elevated popular culture to high art status; similarly, Viola Frey helped elevate ceramics from being considered “craft” to fine art.

 

 

 

 

sources: asuartmuseum, statepress

Living Coral: Pantone’s Color of the Year

 

For 20 years, Pantone’s Color of the Year has influenced product development and purchasing decisions in multiple industries, including fashion, home furnishings, and industrial design, as well as product, packaging, and graphic design.

 

For 2019, Pantone has chosen Living Coral, an animating and life-affirming coral hue with a golden undertone that energizes and enlivens with a softer edge. Vibrant, yet mellow Living Coral aims to provide comfort and buoyancy in our continually shifting environment. Living Coral is a nurturing color that appears in our natural surroundings and at the same time, displays a lively presence within social media.

 

Leatrice Eiseman, Executive Director of the Pantone Color Institute explains the choice, “Color is an equalizing lens through which we experience our natural and digital realities and this is particularly true for Living Coral. With consumers craving human interaction and social connection, the humanizing and heartening qualities displayed by the convivial Pantone Living Coral hit a responsive chord.”

 

The Color of the Year selection process requires thoughtful consideration and trend analysis. To arrive at the selection each year, Pantone’s color experts at the Pantone Color Institute comb the world looking for new color influences. This can include the entertainment industry and films in production, traveling art collections and new artists, fashion, all areas of design, popular travel destinations, as well as new lifestyles, playstyles, and socio-economic conditions. Influences may also stem from new technologies, materials, textures, and effects that impact color, relevant social media platforms and even upcoming sporting events that capture worldwide attention.

 

 

 

source: pantone

The Electric Desert of Phoenix

 

Phoenix’s Desert Botanical Garden presents ‘Electric Desert,’ an electric psychedelic experiment in lights color, and sound … bringing a new experience to night-time viewing of the Arizona desert.

 

Created by video artist Ricardo Rivera and his Philadelphia-based Klip Collective, Rivera uses 3-D projection mapping to create animations that wrap around the cacti to create abstract animations. Founded in 2003, Klip Collective is an experiential video shop that uses virtual reality, projection mapping, storytelling and soundscapes to create captivating, immersive sensory experiences on behalf of institutions, corporate clients and cultural partners.

 

The installation runs now through May 2019.

 

 

source: desert botanical garden

Elowan, the Robot Plant

 

Elowan is a cybernetic lifeform, a plant in direct dialogue with a machine. Using its own internal electrical signals, the plant is interfaced with a robotic extension that drives it toward light. Plants are electrically active systems. They get bio-electrochemically excited and conduct these signals between tissues and organs. Such electrical signals are produced in response to changes in light, gravity, mechanical stimulation, temperature, wounding, and other environmental conditions.

 

The enduring evolutionary processes change the traits of an organism based on its fitness in the environment. In recent history, humans domesticated certain plants, selecting the desired species based on specific traits. A few became house plants, while others were made fit for agricultural practice. From natural habitats to micro-climates, the environments for these plants have significantly altered. As humans, we rely on technological augmentations to tune our fitness to the environment. However, the acceleration of evolution through technology needs to move from a human-centric to a holistic, nature-centric view. Elowan is an attempt to demonstrate what augmentation of nature could mean. Elowan’s robotic base is a new symbiotic association with a plant. The agency of movement rests with the plant based on its own bio-electrochemical signals, the language interfaced here with the artificial world.

 

These in turn trigger physiological variations such as elongation growth, respiration, and moisture absorption. In this experimental setup, electrodes are inserted into the regions of interest (stems and ground, leaf and ground). The weak signals are then amplified and sent to the robot to trigger movements to respective directions. Such symbiotic interplay with the artificial could be extended further with exogenous extensions that provide nutrition, growth frameworks, and new defense mechanisms.

 

source: mit

Yelland’s California Landscapes

 

Sacramento’s Crocker Art is currently exhibiting Raymond Dabb Yelland: California Landscape Painter. This is the first exhibition in more than 50 years to celebrate the life and work of this important 19th-century artist. From Yelland’s arrival in Oakland in 1873 until his death in 1900, he rendered beautiful views of West Coast scenery, incorporating changing fashions of landscape art into paintings that retain credibility as depictions of real places.

 

Born in England in 1948, Yelland was esteemed both for his career as a landscape painter and for his dedication to teaching. The landscapes in this exhibition illustrate his transition from the Hudson River School style of painting, which focused on topographically recognizable scenes painted with meticulous, albeit enhanced, realism, to a more loosely painted, evocative aesthetic popularized by the French Barbizon painters. Many of the paintings in the exhibition glow in the gentle radiance of late afternoon or evening, showcasing Yelland’s keen ability to capture light. These landscapes in particular manifest the artist’s familiarity with Transcendentalist ideas and suggest the spirituality he believed was inherent to California nature.

 

Coast scenes were only one aspect of Yelland’s repertoire. His trips to Oregon and Yosemite inspired depictions of mountain scenery that competed with similar paintings by Thomas Hill and Albert Bierstadt. Although out of fashion in the eastern United States by 1880, paintings of grand subjects like these were still appreciated in California … and these years later this remains truer than ever. The exhibit is on view until January 27, 2019.

 

 

 

 

source: crockerart

Neo Mint: 2020

 

Renowned trend forecaster WGSN, headquartered in London, has declared their prediction for 2020’s color of the year: Neo Mint. Unlike Pantone, who issue the color for the upcoming year, WGSN takes a look into the distant future.

 

Their reason behind the color choice is because Neo Mint is a minted mint tone which combines technology, science, and nature. Additionally the color feels futuristic and is equally suitable for men and women.

 

In fashion, some designers such as Jil Sander and Dries van Noten, showed a similar color for the fall/winter season 2018/19. Neo Mint is a perfect sparring partner to other pastel shades, especially for spring, but the color is also doing well with all metallics.

 

For interiors, it was seen in the staging of Hermès and Mini show at the Salone del Mobile and Gucci’s “Gucci Clinic.”

 

 

sources: wgsn, textilwirtschaft