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Four Decades of Color – Wendy Edwards

 

Bell Gallery at Brown University is currently presenting “Luscious: Paintings and Drawings by Wendy Edwards.” Edwards’ bold artworks are marked by her masterly use of color, her exploration of the physicality of media—primarily oil pigments and soft Sennelier pastels—and her abiding commitment to a feminist vision. This retrospective exhibition—including fifty-six paintings and drawings—spans the four decades of work that Edwards has created since joining the faculty of Brown’s Department of Visual Art in 1980.

 

Edwards came of artistic age in the late seventies, when Pattern and Decoration (P&D) was a prevalent artistic movement. Positioned as a response to minimalism, P&D embraced color—which Edwards acknowledges as foremost among her artistic passions—and decorative patterns drawn from textiles that were often associated with “craft” and gendered as feminine, women’s work. Throughout her oeuvre, Edwards chronicles and responds to experiences relating to her travels, to events in her personal life, and to her interest in nature and natural forms. Iconic compositions of centrally placed objects—flowers, leaves, neckties—appear often in Edwards’ works from the late eighties and continue intermittently to the present day.

 

Two strains of work have occupied Edwards over the past decade. The first was a foray into collage employing Mexican oilcloth. While in Comillas, Spain, Edwards began to use this patterned material as a convenient substrate for paintings. Later, she combined fragments cut from oilcloth with her distinctive nets. The second strain continues her fascination with natural forms. A series of small-scaled paintings of flowers reveal Edwards’ dialogue with earlier art. The exhibit runs through March 15, 2020.

 

 

 

source: brown

 

Modernist Painter Rolph Scarlett – Celebrated in Seattle

 

Seattle’s Frederick Holmes and Company is currently presenting Rolph Scarlett: Legacy Lost and Found,  a comprehensive survey of Modernist painter, Rolph Scarlett (1889-1984), featuring over 40 original paintings and works on paper – non-objective, abstract, and figurative – dating from the 1930’s through the early 1960’s; the largest gallery exhibition ever presented in the Pacific Northwest.

 

Any presentation on the legacy of Scarlett has to include the history of the Guggenheim Museum’s founding, which was the peak of Scarlett’s career. Canadian-born Rolph Scarlett was one of the founding artists of Solomon Guggenheim’s original museum which opened in 1938: The Museum of Non-objective Painting. He became the third most highly collected artist among Guggenheim’s vast holdings which comprised the Museum’s permanent collection.

 

Through the Museum’s founding curator and director, Baroness Hilla Rebay’s zealous leadership and advocacy of this radical avant-garde genre of painting and philosophy, the museum became a groundbreaking institution in New York, attracting collectors, critics, and artists. Rolph Scarlett was introduced to non-objective in 1923 through a chance meeting in Geneva with Paul Klee. In 1938, after submitting a portfolio of gouaches one paper to Baroness Rebay, he was awarded a Guggenheim Grant which was enough to allow him to paint full-time. Described by Rebay as her “greatest find”, Scarlett became one of the exhibiting artists as well as a featured lecturer at the Museum on the principles of non-objective painting.

 

Today, Roph Scarlett is increasingly praised as one of the important contributors to the canon of American Modern. The exhibition is presented in cooperation with the Weinstein Collection, San Francisco, and runs through November 30.

 

 

 

 

source: frederickholmesandcompany

Hans Hofmann: The Nature of Abstraction

 

This fall, the Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) in Salem, Massachusetts is presenting a fresh perspective on Hans Hofmann.  Widely considered to be one of the most influential American artists of the 20th century, the exhibition presents the most comprehensive examination of Hans Hofmann’s innovative and prolific career to date.

 

Hans Hofmann (1880–1966) played a pivotal role in the development of Abstract Expressionism and is celebrated for his exuberant canvases. Renowned as an influential teacher for generations of artists—first in his native Germany, then in New York and Provincetown—Hofmann left an indelible legacy on painting. As a teacher and as a modern artist, Hofmann associated with many of the most notable artists, critics, and dealers of the 20th century, including Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, Wassily Kandinsky, Peggy Guggenheim, Clement Greenberg, Jackson Pollock, and many others.

 

Featuring more than 45 paintings—including works from private collections that have never been exhibited in a museum setting—Hans Hofmann: The Nature of Abstraction presents an unprecedented look at Hofmann’s studio practice, focusing on his continually experimental approach to painting and its expressive potential. The exhibition runs from September 21, 2019, through January 5, 2020

 

 

 

 

source: pem

 

Abstract Artist Yvonne Thomas – Windows and Variations

 

New York City’s Berry Campbell Gallery is celebrating the work of abstract artist Yvonne Thomas in an upcoming exhibition titled Windows and Variations: Paintings from 1963 – 1965.

 

Thomas was born in Nice, France, in 1913, and arrived with her family in the United States in 1925. After first settling in Boston, the family moved to New York, where Thomas studied briefly at Cooper Union. When her parents could not afford her tuition due to the Great Depression, she turned to commercial work, supporting herself as a fashion illustrator.

 

In 1963, a significant change occurred in the art of Yvonne Thomas. Whereas in the 1950s, she had let her paintings lead her in the ways they evolved, following their logic, she now took control of them through a more consistent and systematic approach. The works she produced concur with the ethos of the abstract art of the time. In the view that Abstract Expressionism had foreclosed the mental and preplanned methods that had been important in the art of the past, artists began to bring a conceptual ideas back into their works.

 

In her paintings from 1963 to 1965, Thomas chose as her method of inquiry a repeating pattern of footprint-like rectangles or elongated lozenges that float in loose rows against grounds that are similar in tone, or reveal related tonal modulations. The choice of a design that has a textile look to it may have derived from Thomas’s work during her early career as a fashion illustrator. Some of the works in this exhibition belong to a series called The Window, implying more of the process of looking and having a sense of distance than the direct gesturalism of Abstract Expressionism.

 

The paintings are also about the power of color. By emphasizing the unity of a work by the patterns that repeat across the entirety of a surface—even if they are not uniform—the images are meant to be read as totalities rather than compositions. It is thought that Thomas was drawing on her memories of her early years in France, as the paintings are reminiscent of the experience of the stained-glass windows in French cathedrals through which sunlight is transformed into spiritualized color. By limiting the colors in each of the paintings, Thomas makes color their subject, drawing the viewer into a consideration of how color is both associative and visceral.

 

The exhibition runs September 5 through October 5, 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

sources: berrycampbell, wikipedia

Field of Light in Paso Robles

 

Internationally-acclaimed British artist Bruce Munro has premiered his largest artwork to date—an enormous multi-acre walk-through installation—at Sensorio in Paso Robles, California. Bruce Munro: Field of Light at Sensorio is comprised of an array of over 58,800 stemmed spheres lit by fiber-optics, gently illuminating the landscape in subtle blooms of morphing color that describe the undulating landscape. Powered by solar, the stunning exhibition will captivate visitors, inviting them to engage with the landscape and environment through an ethereal light-based and sculptural experience. Tickets are currently available through January 2020.

 

Munro is best known for immersive large-scale light-based installations inspired largely by his interest in shared human experience. Recording ideas and images in sketchbooks has been his practice for over 30 years. By this means he has captured his responses to stimuli such as music, literature, science, and the world around him for reference, reflection, and subject matter. This tendency has been combined with a liking for components and an inventive urge for reuse, coupled with career training in manufacture of light. As a result Munro produces both monumental temporary experiential artworks as well as intimate story-pieces.

 

Sensorio, the intersection of art, technology and nature, will be a destination for entertainment, exploration, meditation, adventure and delight. Sensorio will honor the natural topography of the landscape and offer a wide range of amusing, mystical and kinetic experiences. The Central California destination launches with the interactive light installation by Bruce Munro, as other exhibits and buildings are put into place for an expected opening in 2021. Future attractions at Sensorio will include a hotel and conference center.

 

sources: sensoriopaso, brucemunro

 

Theirry Mutler in Montreal

 

The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) is currently presenting the very first exhibition on the work of French creator Thierry Mugler. Initiated, produced and circulated by the MMFA, this retrospective reveals the multiple worlds of this irrepressible artistic figure – at once visionary couturier, director, photographer and perfumer – by revisiting his prêt-à-porter and haute couture creations.

 

Thierry Mugler: Couturissime brings together more than 150 garments made between 1977 and 2014, most of which are being shown for the first time, as well as a wealth of unpublished archival documents and sketches. One hundred or so photographs by such world-renowned fashion photographers as Helmut Newton, Sarah Moon, Pierre et Gilles, David LaChapelle, Paolo Roversi, Herb Ritts, Dominique Issermann, Guy Bourdin and Richard Avedon, to name a few, round out the show. Each of the immersive galleries has been designed in collaboration with talented artist-designers and set designers, including Michel Lemieux, Philipp Fürhofer and Rodeo FX.

 

The exhibition runs through September 8, 2019.

 

 

 

source: mmfa

Exhibition in Nashville by Provocative Artist Diana Al-Hadid

 

Frist Art Museum in Nashville recently opened Diana Al-Hadid: Sublimations. Visually extravagant and conceptually provocative, Diana Al-Hadid’s sculptures, wall panels, and drawings are inspired by a range of sources, from art and architectural history to mythology and literature from around the world. Transforming the vestiges of such inheritances into improvised assemblages, intricate fields of dripping gypsum, and partially articulated human figures, Al-Hadid meditates on cycles of dissipation and renewal within and among cultures. Just as the word sublimation denotes a chemical transformation from one state of being into another, her work suggests changes wrought by time, as substance mutates into sensation and thought.

 

Works in this exhibition revisit archetypal narratives that depict the female body in psychologically limiting terms, which Al-Hadid challenges, transforms, or dissolves. These legacies are often shaped by male desire and fantasy, inviting an alternate reading of sublimation as envisioned by Sigmund Freud, who used the word to define the transfer of energy from negative behavior—frequently involving unacceptable sexual impulses—to more wholesome outlets. In exploring these dual aspects of sublimation, Al-Hadid reimagines cultural legacies of complexity, irony, turbulence, and beauty.

 

The exhibition runs through September 2, 2019.

 

 

 

source: firstartmuseum

Textiles of Frank Lloyd Wright

 

NYC’s The Met Fifth Avenue is currently presenting Frank Lloyd Wright Textiles: The Taliesin Line, 1955–60. The installation runs through April 5, 2020.

 

In 1955, the renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright launched the first commercial venture of his long and eminent career, designing a line of affordable home products for the general consumer. The designs for the fabrics and wallpapers, based on Wright’s architectural vocabulary and inspired by specific buildings, were featured in a sample book, Schumacher’s Taliesin Line of Decorative Fabrics and Wallpapers Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright (1955). Only 100 copies of the sample book were printed and were available exclusively to authorized dealers.

 

This installation presents the book and nine examples of the fabric it introduced, all from the original line produced by F. Schumacher and Co. In addition to the textiles that reflect the signature Wright aesthetic, the installation also includes two examples of Wright-designed wooden vases that were made in a very limited number and never reached the open market.

 

 

 

source: metmuseum

 

Gunpowder Artist at Cleveland Museum

 

Cai Guo-Qiang: Cuyahoga River Lightning is now open at The Cleveland Museum of Art and runs through September 22, 2019. It features three monumental gunpowder works by Chinese artist Cai Guo-Qiang, known for his explosion events, gunpowder paintings, and installations, all using environmentally friendly material.

 

While Cuyahoga River Lightning: Drawing for the Cleveland Museum of Art (2018) was created especially for the exhibition, the other two exhibited works in monochrome and polychrome gunpowder illustrate the artist’s reflections on the state of our planet, wildlife, and the world’s diminishing natural reserves of fresh water.

 

This exhibition is part of a citywide commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the last Cuyahoga River fire and celebration of the progress made toward clean water for all. The river is famous for having been so polluted that it “caught fire” in 1969. The event helped to spur the environmental movement in the US.

 

 

 

sources: clevelandart, wikipedia

Hockney & Van Gogh in Amsterdam

 

For the first time, the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam is bringing two greats together . . . David Hockney and Vincent Van Gogh. Hockney – Van Gogh: The Joy of Nature demonstrates the influence of Van Gogh on Hockney’s work, exploring both artists’ fascination with nature, their use of bright, contrasting colors and their experimentation with perspective.

 

The landscape paintings show clear links with Van Gogh’s landscapes, such as The Harvest (1888), Field with Irises near Arles (1888) and The Garden of Saint Paul’s Hospital (‘Leaf-Fall’) (1889). The stylized vertical lines of the tree trunks in the latter work by Van Gogh are analogous to the repetitive lines in Hockney’s renowned The Arrival of Spring in Woldgate, East Yorkshire in 2011.

 

A multimedia guide, created especially for the exhibition and featuring the voice of David Hockney, takes visitors through the exhibition. In a range of guided tours (available in six languages), museum guides introduce visitors to the links between Van Gogh and Hockney. The exhibition runs through May 26, 2019.

 

 

 

source: vangoghmuseum