LuxeLife

The Futurist Fashion of Iris van Herpen

 

Iris van Herpen is a Dutch fashion designer who is widely recognized as one of fashion’s most talented and forward-thinking creators who continuously pushes the boundaries of fashion design. Renowned for her use of 3-D printing, van Herpen is widely considered one of contemporary fashion’s most progressive creators, and is a favored designer of style icons, including Beyoncé, Lady Gaga, Björk, Cara Delevingne, and others. Phoenix Art Museum is the western-most destination on the North American tour of the exhibition “Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion” (February 24, 2018 through May 13, 2018) and the last chance to see these extraordinary collections of futuristic fashions in the USA.

 

Since her first collection in 2007, van Herpen has made a name for herself within and beyond the fashion world by combining tradition with radical innovation. Unparalleled in her multidisciplinary approach to creation, she has collaborated with artists, architects, and scientists such as Philip Beesley, Jólan van der Wiel, and Bart Hess, as well as teams at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 2011, TIME Magazine included her 3-D printed dresses on its list of 50 Best Inventions.

 

Featuring 45 ensembles created from 2008 – 2015, the minimalistic installation will also include a selection of her fantastical shoe designs and runway show footage. A featured work is the dress from her 2014 collection Biopiracy, on view for the first time since it was purchased by Arizona Costume Institute to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the fashion design collection and the Museum.

 

 

 

 

 

source: phxart

Andy Warhol’s First Selfies Sold

 

Andy Warhol’s first selfies recently were auctioned off by Sotheby’s. In the latter part of the twentieth-century, Andy Warhol joined the ranks of Rembrandt van Rijn, Vincent van Gogh, and Pablo Picasso to take his place amongst the most important and influential self-portraitists in the history of art. Throughout his career, he turned to his own visage to create works such as the present painting, filled with immediacy, vivacity, and sleek conceptual cool. Indeed, the present work is one of the first ten self-portraits that Warhol ever created and thus holds immense significance.

 

Warhol made Self-Portrait and the extant eight versions using images he had taken in a New York photo-booth. The use of such unconventional source material was, at this time, fiercely innovative, and added to the aura of technical invention that already surrounded this artist, who had pioneered the use of silkscreen printing in art only a couple of years previously. The lot sold for over 6 million British pounds.

 

source: Sotheby’s

“World’s Largest Picture Frame” Opens in Dubai

 

Dubai’s new monument soars almost 500 ft. tall and is the “world’s largest picture frame.” The structure represents the aspirations and achievements of the city. A decade in the making … in 2008, an international contest was organized by German elevator company Thyssen Krupp in collaboration with the International Union of Architects (UIA), which has UNESCO backing. Mexican architect Fernando Donis submitted a structure that would “embrace a void” and frame other monuments. His unique idea beat out 900 entries.

 

The glittering structure lights up at night as visitors stroll across the 305 ft. glass bottom walkway. From there, they have a sweeping panorama of the city, including a view of the iconic Burj Khalifa.

 

 

 

source: mymodernmet

 

Voice Activated Toilet with Mood Lighting

 

In the old wild West, cowboys would have never dreamed that many years later there would be such a remarkable way to replace the outhouse. But at the recent CES show in Las Vegas, Kohler introduced that there’s a new toilet in town. Their new “Numi” toilet (running at over six thousand dollars) can warm your bottom, set mood lighting, flush and close its lid without being touched.

 

A specially designed app for iOS and Android enables both voice commands and hands-free motion control. It has a motion-activated lid and seat, a retracting bidet and air dryer, a built-in air deodorizer, a heated seat, and floor-level vents. Additionally, a touchscreen remote gives a slew of customizable options – all saved separately for each user of the household including a built-in music system and ambient lighting. An app for iOS and Android enables both voice commands and hands-free motion control.

 

source: kohler

Bill Gates Lending Leonardo da Vinci’s Writings

 

In 1994, Bill Gates bought a rare set of Leonardo da Vinci’s scientific writings, the Codex Leicester, for nearly 31 million dollars from the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles at Christie’s New York. Now Gates is lending da Vinci’s work to the Uffizi galleries for an exhibition in Florence in 2018 in anticipation of the 500th anniversary of da Vinci’s death. The manuscript, which belonged for centuries to the descendants of the first Earl of Leicester, was compiled between 1504 and 1508.

 

Besides the physical manuscript, digital screens will allow visitors to flip through the pages and access transcriptions and interpretations of the texts—written in Leonardo’s characteristic back-to-front mirrored style. There will also be drawings from the same period on loan from Italian and international museum collections.

 

The manuscript drew more than 400,000 visitors when it was shown as the Hammer Codex at the city’s Palazzo Vecchio in 1982, named after its then owner, the US petroleum magnate Armand Hammer.

 

 

sources: uffizi, theartnewspaper

MCA’s Heaven and Earth

 

 

For Chicago’s Museum of Contemporary Art’s 50th anniversary, they are bringing together two of the most important artists in the museum’s history, as well as icons of the last 100 years. Heaven and Earth: Alexander Calder and Jeff Koons finds common ground between these seemingly disparate artists, with Alexander Calder’s weightless sculptures nominally representing “heaven” and Jeff Koons’s celebrations of the mundane and concrete as “earth.” This pairing highlights both artists’ interest in playing with balance and gravity to make compelling sculptural statements, while reveling in the contrasts between high art aspirations and mundane material choices.

 

 

Calder (American, 1898–1976) originally made a name for himself in the 1920s for inventive bent-wire portraits and later his extraordinary and performative circus sculptures. He is best known, however, for the delicate floating sculptures of metal and wire that have come to be known as “mobiles”—a term coined by Marcel Duchamp. The MCA has extensive holdings of Calder’s work that have been regularly shown for decades, and in 2010, the museum produced a major exhibition titled Alexander Calder and Contemporary Art: Form Balance Joy.

 

 

In the early 1980s, Koons (American, b. 1954) ushered in an influential new era of art with works that borrow from liquor advertisements or posters of basketball legends, as well as over-the-top celebrations of household goods like vacuum cleaners, in order to redefine the boundaries of taste. His star power was recognized early on and the MCA organized his first museum exhibition in 1988, and revisited his work with a major survey in 2008. Thanks to many generous gifts, the MCA collection holds his work in depth.

 

 

This playful and unexpected pairing of two of the most recognized artists of the modern era have an extended presence in the MCA’s galleries and will be updated periodically with substitutions by both artists. The exhibition runs through December 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

source: mcachicago

Google’s Synchronized Lighting Display in Berlin

 

Google recently partnered with U.K.-based energy and data-harvesting pioneer Pavegen to make Berlin’s 2017 Festival of Lights interactive. The footsteps of visitors to the world’s largest single energy harvesting array were converted into off-grid electrical energy, enabling a synchronized lighting display. Footsteps of visitors to the record-breaking 26-square meter installation set off 176 light panels embedded in the walls of this installation. Their unique moments were then captured and shared as video GIFs and stills by a photo pod at the end of the array.

 

This is the first time that Google has exhibited at the Berlin Festival of Lights. The headline event, which attracts upwards of two million guests in the heart of Germany’s cultural capital, is a celebration of the visual arts with ambitious and dynamic light installations bringing to life the city’s most famous places.

 

 

 

 

 

source: pavegen

Europe’s First Underwater Restaurant

 

 

At the southernmost point of the Norwegian coastline by the village of Båly, the award-winning architect firm, Snøhetta, has designed Europe’s very first underwater restaurant . . . appropriately named Under. With its immediate proximity with the forces of nature, the restaurant, which will also function as a research center for marine life, is a tribute to the Norwegian coast and to Lindesnes – to the wild fauna of the sea and to the rocky coastline of Norway’s southern tip.

 

Under’s namesake holds a double meaning: In Norwegian, “under” can just as well be translated into “wonder.” Half-sunken into the sea, the building’s monolithic form breaks the water surface to lie against the craggy shoreline. More than an aquarium, the structure will become a part of its marine environment, coming to rest directly on the sea bed five meters below the water’s surface. With meter-thick concrete walls, the structure is built to withstand pressure and shock from the rugged sea conditions. Like a sunken periscope, the restaurant’s massive acrylic windows offer a view of the seabed as it changes throughout the seasons and varying weather conditions.

 

As visitors begin their journey through the restaurant they descend through three levels. From the entrance, where the tidepool is swallowed by the sea, guests enter the wardrobe area. Visitors are then ushered down one level to the champagne bar, which marks the transition between the shoreline and the ocean. This physical transformation is emphasized by a narrow acrylic window cutting vertically down through the restaurant levels. From the bar, guests can also look down at the seabed level of the restaurant, where two long dining tables and several smaller tables are placed in front of the large panoramic window.

 

Through its architecture, menu and mission of informing the public about the biodiversity of the sea, Under will provide an under-water experience inspiring a sense of awe and delight, activating all the senses – both physical and intellectual. The restaurant will be opened to the public in 2019.

 

 

 

 

source: snohetta

Huge Holograms Hovering

 

 

Six hundred laser beams, 10 million pixels of video, 20-metre-wide holograms – and one DJ. Eric Prydz is known for putting on a good show, and his latest topped even his previous efforts in both scale and impact. At a recent show that took place in London’s Victoria Park, a crowd of 15,000 soaked up an audiovisual feast of electronic music, video and lighting effects. Holograms and lasers are a trademark of Prydz’s shows, pushing innovative effects using the latest tech. There were animations building and twisting around the stage in time to the beat, holograms of astronauts, satellites and tornadoes, and lasers radiating over the crowd in every color and configuration.

 

A huge V-shaped video display forms the back wall of the stage, measuring 2304 by 576 LED pixels – more than a million in total. The illusions are cast onto the screen by four laser projectors, the outputs of which are merged to create a single image. Each projector kicks out 30,000 lumens of laser light, and as they use a laser engine instead of a bulb, explains Calvert, the brightness stays consistent for longer.

 

Creative director and VJ Liam Tomaszewski is responsible for the content of the animations. He’s been working with Prydz 2011. When Tomaszewski first started, the team used a form of holographic trickery called Pepper’s Ghost illusion, which involves carefully lighting things through a thin film. Since moving to the projection system he’s learned what works best in a hologram: using slow movement so your eyes can really focus on the image, avoiding using too much black and making sure to keep the animation inside the frame. At 4K resolution and with a frame rate of 50 fps, some of the holograms took a week to render.

 

 

 

source: wired

The Fascinating Sculpture of Rachel Whiteread

 

 

London’s Tate Museum is celebrating over 25 years of Rachel Whiteread’s internationally acclaimed sculpture. The show tracks Whiteread’s career and brings together well-known works such as Untitled (100 Spaces) 1995 and Untitled (Staircase) 2001 alongside new pieces that have never been previously exhibited.

 

 

One of Britain’s leading contemporary artists, Whiteread uses industrial materials such as plaster, concrete, resin, rubber and metal to cast everyday objects and architectural space. Her evocative sculptures range from the intimate to the monumental. Born in London in 1963, Whiteread was the first woman to win the Turner Prize in 1993. The same year she made House 1993–1994, a life-sized cast of the interior of a condemned terraced house in London’s East End, which existed for a few months before it was controversially demolished.

 

 

On the lawn outside Tate Britain a new concrete sculpture, Chicken Shed 2017, will sit during the exhibition. The exhibition runs now through January 21, 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sources: tate, wikipedia