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Love, Death and The Time I Knew You

 

London’s HOFA Gallery is currently presenting  contemporary portraitist and surrealist painter, Loribelle Spirovski’s first Solo Exhibition. Titled Love, Death and The Time I Knew You, this solo show will assemble select artwork from her most successful collections, showcasing her prolific talent and remarkable growth as a contemporary artist.

 

Born in the Philippines in 1990, this Australian artist has fascinated audiences at home and abroad with her distinctive style and approach to contemporary portraiture. Though admittedly intuitive, Loribelle’s artistic style is also decidedly cerebral, rooted in the myths, music, literature, pop culture and experiences that inspire her and make her art resonate with viewers.

 

The exhibition runs through December 11, 2019.

 

 

 

source: thehouseoffineart

Disrupt! The Eighth Edition of the Amsterdam Light Festival

 

Over twenty light artists from sixteen countries are radiating their creative visions in the eighth edition of Amsterdam Light Festival opening tomorrow.

 

The theme for this year’s festival is Disrupt! – a sudden disruption that can signify chaos, but can also empower change. The international artists have interpreted the theme in many different ways, from creating new structures to transforming existing architecture, giving visitors a chance to see reality in a new light.

 

The Amsterdam Light Festival can be viewed on foot, by bike, or by boat and runs through January 19, 2020.

 

 

 

 

source: amsterdamlightfestival

Four Decades of Color – Wendy Edwards

 

Bell Gallery at Brown University is currently presenting “Luscious: Paintings and Drawings by Wendy Edwards.” Edwards’ bold artworks are marked by her masterly use of color, her exploration of the physicality of media—primarily oil pigments and soft Sennelier pastels—and her abiding commitment to a feminist vision. This retrospective exhibition—including fifty-six paintings and drawings—spans the four decades of work that Edwards has created since joining the faculty of Brown’s Department of Visual Art in 1980.

 

Edwards came of artistic age in the late seventies, when Pattern and Decoration (P&D) was a prevalent artistic movement. Positioned as a response to minimalism, P&D embraced color—which Edwards acknowledges as foremost among her artistic passions—and decorative patterns drawn from textiles that were often associated with “craft” and gendered as feminine, women’s work. Throughout her oeuvre, Edwards chronicles and responds to experiences relating to her travels, to events in her personal life, and to her interest in nature and natural forms. Iconic compositions of centrally placed objects—flowers, leaves, neckties—appear often in Edwards’ works from the late eighties and continue intermittently to the present day.

 

Two strains of work have occupied Edwards over the past decade. The first was a foray into collage employing Mexican oilcloth. While in Comillas, Spain, Edwards began to use this patterned material as a convenient substrate for paintings. Later, she combined fragments cut from oilcloth with her distinctive nets. The second strain continues her fascination with natural forms. A series of small-scaled paintings of flowers reveal Edwards’ dialogue with earlier art. The exhibit runs through March 15, 2020.

 

 

 

source: brown

 

The Museum of Graffiti, Opening in Miami, Art Basel Week

 

The Museum of Graffiti is set to open to the public on December 5th in the heart of Miami’s Wynwood neighborhood and is the world’s first museum exclusively dedicated to the evolution of the graffiti art form.

 

Once ephemeral – painted on walls and subway trains, only to be dissolved away by the cleaning crews – graffiti has gone mainstream with a vengeance. To fully appreciate the current position of the movement, it is essential to know and understand the work of the original graffiti artists, who started tagging in the New York subways in the early 1970s and early ‘80s.  The museum’s permanent exhibition will feature paintings, mixed media sculptures, and interactive installations that will allow visitors to travel through time and learn about the evolution of the worldwide graffiti art movement.

 

The museum strives to preserve archives and artifacts of the graffiti art movement for the benefit of the public. Rotating exhibitions will educate our visitors on the evolution of the graffiti art movement. Owned and operated by graffiti artists, the institution is dedicated to celebrating previously marginalized artists from around the world who have shaped an entire genre of art with little to no recognition. The museum experience includes an exhibition space and a world-class gift shop stocked with limited edition merchandise and exclusive items from the world’s most talented graffiti artists, including limited-edition artist collaborations and a curated collection of toys, apparel, books, prints, accessories and specialty items developed exclusively for the museum.

 

The Museum of Graffiti’s special opening exhibition will feature works by Niels Meulman, a.k.a. Shoe, a graffiti pioneer from Amsterdam. The exhibition entitled, Negative Space, will feature exciting new works by the artist presented in an immersive environment created by Meulman for the museum.

 

Also involved with the opening, RISK, the American contemporary street artist, graphic designer, philanthropist, entrepreneur and the founder of the Third Rail art series, will be there to sign and embellish exclusive prints of his work.

 

 

source: museumofgraffiti

Empire State Building’s New 102nd Floor Observatory

 

The Empire State Building opened the third phase of its top-to-bottom reimagined observatory experience to the public on October 12. The newly renovated 102nd floor observatory features floor-to-ceiling glass windows where guests can step right to the edge of the world’s most famous building.

 

Construction of the 102nd floor began in January 2019 within a state-of-the-art suspended “cocoon” — a circular scaffolding structure — the highest of its kind in New York. The cocoon allowed work to take place with no impact to guests visiting the world-famous 86th floor Observatory.

 

Made up of 24 crystal-clear, eight-foot-tall windows, the 102nd floor is an enclosed, climate-controlled, all-weather Observation Deck allowing 360-degree views of the city and beyond from the heart of New York City. “The 102nd floor Observatory is the crown jewel of the Empire State Building. We’ve removed all the obstructions and obstacles, giving Guests access to a view that is centrally-located and unrivaled in New York City,” said Anthony E. Malkin, Chairman and CEO of Empire State Realty Trust. “The Observatory Entrance and the second-floor galleries have been embraced by our visitors, and the 102nd floor’s reopening is a major moment in our progress to complete the new Empire State Building Observatory Experience.”

 

Tickets to the 86th floor Observatory start at $38 and tickets to the new 102nd floor Observatory can be purchased for an additional $20 either online or on-site at kiosks located on the second and 86th Floor.

 

 

sources: empirestaterealtytrust, esbnyc

 

Modernist Painter Rolph Scarlett – Celebrated in Seattle

 

Seattle’s Frederick Holmes and Company is currently presenting Rolph Scarlett: Legacy Lost and Found,  a comprehensive survey of Modernist painter, Rolph Scarlett (1889-1984), featuring over 40 original paintings and works on paper – non-objective, abstract, and figurative – dating from the 1930’s through the early 1960’s; the largest gallery exhibition ever presented in the Pacific Northwest.

 

Any presentation on the legacy of Scarlett has to include the history of the Guggenheim Museum’s founding, which was the peak of Scarlett’s career. Canadian-born Rolph Scarlett was one of the founding artists of Solomon Guggenheim’s original museum which opened in 1938: The Museum of Non-objective Painting. He became the third most highly collected artist among Guggenheim’s vast holdings which comprised the Museum’s permanent collection.

 

Through the Museum’s founding curator and director, Baroness Hilla Rebay’s zealous leadership and advocacy of this radical avant-garde genre of painting and philosophy, the museum became a groundbreaking institution in New York, attracting collectors, critics, and artists. Rolph Scarlett was introduced to non-objective in 1923 through a chance meeting in Geneva with Paul Klee. In 1938, after submitting a portfolio of gouaches one paper to Baroness Rebay, he was awarded a Guggenheim Grant which was enough to allow him to paint full-time. Described by Rebay as her “greatest find”, Scarlett became one of the exhibiting artists as well as a featured lecturer at the Museum on the principles of non-objective painting.

 

Today, Roph Scarlett is increasingly praised as one of the important contributors to the canon of American Modern. The exhibition is presented in cooperation with the Weinstein Collection, San Francisco, and runs through November 30.

 

 

 

 

source: frederickholmesandcompany

Major Monet Exhibition in Denver

 

The Denver Art Museum will be home to the most comprehensive U.S. exhibition of Monet paintings in more than two decades. The exhibition will feature more than 120 paintings spanning Monet’s entire career and will focus on the celebrated French impressionist artist’s enduring relationship with nature and his response to the varied and distinct places in which he worked.

 

The presentation of Claude Monet: The Truth of Nature will explore Monet’s continuous interest in capturing the quickly changing atmospheres, the reflective qualities of water and the effects of light, aspects that increasingly led him to work on multiple canvases at once. Additionally, the exhibition will examine the critical shift in Monet’s painting when he began to focus on series of the same subject, including artworks from his series of Haystacks, Poplars, Waterloo Bridge, and Waterlilies.

 

Monet traveled more extensively than any other impressionist artist in search of new motifs. His journeys to varied places including the rugged Normandy coast, the sunny Mediterranean, London, the Netherlands, and Norway inspired artworks that will be featured in the presentation. The exhibition will uncover Monet’s continuous dialogue with nature and its places through a thematic and chronological arrangement, from the first examples of artworks still indebted to the landscape tradition to the revolutionary compositions and series of his late years.

 

The exhibition will also delve into the artist’s increasing abandonment of any human presence in the landscapes he created, a testimony to his commitment to isolate himself in nature. This creative process simultaneously established an intimacy with his subject, which culminated later in Giverny, where he created his own motif through meticulous planning, planting, and nurturing of his flowers and plants, which he then translated onto the canvas.

 

Co-organized with the Museum Barberini in Germany, Denver will be the sole U.S. venue for Claude Monet: The Truth of Nature which runs from October 21, 2019 to February 2, 2020.

 

 

 

 

source: denverartmuseum

 

MIT Art-Science Project Makes $2 Million Diamond “Disappear”

 

The MIT Center for Art, Science & Technology and the New York Stock Exchange are currently presenting The Redemption of Vanity, created by artist Diemut Strebe in collaboration with MIT scientist Brian Wardle and his lab, on view at the New York Stock Exchange through November 25, 2019 by appointment only. For the work, a 16.78 carat natural yellow diamond valued at $2 million from L.J.West was coated using a new procedure of generating carbon nanotubes (CNTs), recently measured to be the blackest black ever created, which makes the diamond seem to disappear into an invisible void. The patented carbon nanotube technology (CNT) absorbs more than 99.96% of light and was developed by Professor Wardle and his necstlab lab at MIT.

 

“Any object covered with this CNT material loses all its plasticity and appears entirely flat, abbreviated/reduced to a black silhouette. In outright contradiction to this we see that a diamond, while made of the very same element (carbon) performs the most intense reflection of light on earth. Because of the extremely high light absorbtive qualities of the CNTs, any object, in this case a large diamond coated with CNT’s, becomes a kind of black hole absent of shadows,“ explains Strebe. “The unification of extreme opposites in one object and the particular aesthetic features of the CNTs caught my imagination for this art project.”

 

“Strebe’s art-science collaboration caused us to look at the optical properties of our new CNT growth, and we discovered that these particular CNTs are blacker than all other reported materials by an order of magnitude across the visible spectrum”, says Wardle. The MIT team is offering the process for any artist to use. “We do not believe in exclusive ownership of any material or idea for any artwork and have opened our method to any artist,” say Strebe and Wardle.

 

“The project explores material and immaterial value attached to objects and concepts in reference to luxury, society and to art. We are presenting the literal devaluation of a diamond, which is highly symbolic and of high economic value. It presents a challenge to art market mechanisms on the one hand, while expressing at the same time questions of the value of art in a broader way. In this sense it manifests an inquiry into the significance of the value of objects of art and the art market,” says Strebe. “We are honored to present this work at The New York Stock Exchange, which I believe to be a most fitting location to consider the ideas embedded in The Redemption of Vanity.”

 

 

 

 

source: the-redemption-of-vanity

12th Annual Singapore Night Festival

 

The Singapore Night Festival just completed its 12th annual event over two weekends in August. To commemorate the Singapore Bicentennial, the festival incorporated folklore and a Southeast Asian flair into this year’s art. The façade of iconic landmarks sprung to life in dazzling brilliance in Singapore’s Bras Basah.Bugis district with more than 40 performances as well as 16 light art installations and projections cast onto the city.

 

 

 

 

 

source: singapore night festival

Hans Hofmann: The Nature of Abstraction

 

This fall, the Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) in Salem, Massachusetts is presenting a fresh perspective on Hans Hofmann.  Widely considered to be one of the most influential American artists of the 20th century, the exhibition presents the most comprehensive examination of Hans Hofmann’s innovative and prolific career to date.

 

Hans Hofmann (1880–1966) played a pivotal role in the development of Abstract Expressionism and is celebrated for his exuberant canvases. Renowned as an influential teacher for generations of artists—first in his native Germany, then in New York and Provincetown—Hofmann left an indelible legacy on painting. As a teacher and as a modern artist, Hofmann associated with many of the most notable artists, critics, and dealers of the 20th century, including Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, Wassily Kandinsky, Peggy Guggenheim, Clement Greenberg, Jackson Pollock, and many others.

 

Featuring more than 45 paintings—including works from private collections that have never been exhibited in a museum setting—Hans Hofmann: The Nature of Abstraction presents an unprecedented look at Hofmann’s studio practice, focusing on his continually experimental approach to painting and its expressive potential. The exhibition runs from September 21, 2019, through January 5, 2020

 

 

 

 

source: pem