LuxeLife

LIGHT UP LA – STUDIO EVENT APRIL 5, 2018

 

 

 

It was a beautiful sunny LA day as the West Coast design community visited us for our annual LIGHT UP LA Open House.

 

We always enjoy showing off our headquarters to new design partners and welcoming friends returning to see what’s new!

 

Our guests had a sneak preview of our new Spring ’18 Luxe Light & Home collections ahead of their official release at High Point Spring Market – the GRAMERCY midcentury starburst of brass or nickel and Brazilian Quartz crystal is already a hit! And the delightful ARABELLE was her fabulous sparkling self! See the Luxe site for all the options – and of course we can customize the designs to fit your project.

 

Talking of custom, our visitors also enjoyed tours of our 85,000 sqft factory and design offices  where we create our Lusive signature custom lighting for hospitality, contract and residential applications worldwide.

 

Our inhouse artisans conducted an interactive gold leafing workshop and then we all mingled together in our beautiful studios, sipping on signature Elusive Sidecar cocktails as the sun went down…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stanford Researchers are Seeing Around Corners

 

A driverless car is making its way through a winding neighborhood street, about to make a sharp turn onto a road where a child’s ball has just rolled. Although no person in the car can see that ball, the car stops to avoid it. This is because the car is outfitted with extremely sensitive laser technology that reflects off nearby objects to see around corners. This scenario is one of many that researchers at Stanford University are imagining for a system that can produce images of objects hidden from view. They are focused on applications for autonomous vehicles, some of which already have similar laser-based systems for detecting objects around the car, but other uses could include seeing through foliage from aerial vehicles or giving rescue teams the ability to find people blocked from view by walls and rubble.

 

For their system, the researchers set a laser next to a highly sensitive photon detector, which can record even a single particle of light. They shoot pulses of laser light at a wall and, invisible to the human eye, those pulses bounce off objects around the corner and bounce back to the wall and to the detector. Currently, this scan can take from two minutes to an hour, depending on conditions such as lighting and the reflectivity of the hidden object.

 

Once the scan is finished, the algorithm untangles the paths of the captured photons and, like the mythical image enhancement technology of television crime shows, the blurry blob takes much sharper form. It does all this in less than a second and is so efficient it can run on a regular laptop. Based on how well the algorithm currently works, the researchers think they could speed it up so that it is nearly instantaneous once the scan is complete.

 

The team is continuing to work on this system, so it can better handle the variability of the real world and complete the scan more quickly. For example, the distance to the object and amount of ambient light can make it difficult for their technology to see the light particles it needs to resolve out-of-sight objects. This technique also depends on analyzing scattered light particles that are intentionally ignored by guidance systems currently in cars – known as LIDAR systems.

 

Before this system is road ready, it will also have to work better in daylight and with objects in motion, like a bouncing ball or running child. The researchers did test their technique successfully outside but they worked only with indirect light. Their technology did perform particularly well picking out retroreflective objects, such as safety apparel or traffic signs. The researchers say that if the technology were placed on a car today, that car could easily detect things like road signs, safety vests or road markers, although it might struggle with a person wearing non-reflective clothing.

 

source: stanford

Forensic Architecture Assembling Evidence of the Grenfell Tower Fire

 

In June of 2017, the Grenfell Tower fire was unprecedented in London’s history, not least because the catastrophe was captured live by thousands of videos of the fire, taken by Londoners on their cameras and smartphones. Every one of those videos is a unique piece of evidence, containing unique information.

 

Forensic Architecture, an independent research agency based at Goldsmiths, University of London, has started to collect these pieces of evidence and assemble them within a 3D model of Grenfell Tower. Our aim is to create a powerful and freely-available resource for members of the public to explore and better understand the events of the night of the fire.

 

These pieces of footage will become a continuous ‘3D video’ of the fire, mapped onto our architectural model of Grenfell Tower. The model will allow the user to investigate the fire, and will sit within a web platform which will ultimately act as a freely available public resource.

 

In recent years Forensic Architecture has successfully tested its methodologies in a number of landmark legal and human rights cases undertaken together with and on behalf of threatened communities, NGOs, prosecutors and the UN.

 

sources: forensic-architecture, wikipedia

KRAVET Debuts New Los Angeles Showroom & Becomes A Lighting Destination!

 

KRAVET Debuts New Los Angeles Showroom & Becomes A Lighting Destination!

 

The cream of the design industry attended the opening of the beautiful new Kravet showroom at the Pacific Design Center.

 

Coinciding with their 100 Year celebrations, the new space debuts all that Kravet is known for – stunning fabrics, designer furniture collections, sophisticated carpets … and – as Luxe Light & Home continue to proudly partner with them to offer our lighting collections – yes, Kravet offers lighting!

 

Visit the PDC team to see the best of all products in their new, luxurious surroundings!

 

 

 

Floating Housing Complex on the Hudson?

 

Pier 40, a decaying 15-acre structure on the Hudson River, is being re-imagined by DFA, a New York architecture firm. New York City’s sea level is expected to rise 11-30 inches by 2050 and between 50 to 75 inches by 2100, with the majority of current buildings not designed to accommodate such inevitable changes. DFA’s vision for Pier 40 takes a longer-term view with comprehensive design approach for the future.

 

Following an analysis of the zoning and state of existing piles, DFA identified areas that are fit for supporting clusters of program influenced by the Pier’s predominant recreational use and addressing a city-wide need for affordable housing. Combining the analysis with design, DFA utilized an algorithm to determine the optimal location for each tower type, determining that each tower must have at least three structurally sound connection points to support the weight/load. From this four tower typologies ranging between 96- to 455-feet tall emerge as viable options for spreading 450-units and a variety of housing density across the site.

 

 

 

 

source: d-f-a

Tiny House Challenge Brings Big Ideas

Ryterna modul, a European modular container and building producer recently announced the winners of their fourth International competition: Architectural Challenge 2018 Tiny House. 150 entries from 88 countries had the task of designing a home for two people no larger than 25 square meters that integrated a kitchen, bathroom, living room, and sleeping area into a cohesive environment. Here are the three winning solutions and one honorable mention:

 

Abdolrahman Kadkhodasalehi took first prize with “Wave House,” a semi-circular structure that appears to dance on its minimal foundations. Large planes of glass, natural materials, and an integrated water harvesting system keep the home in constant dialogue with its surroundings.

 

 

Second place was awarded to “Torii House,” a modular proposal by Julia and Stas Kaptur. Consisting of a core module flanked by two additional programs wrapped in wood, Torri House can be endlessly customized with terraces, saunas, and additional spaces for larger families. The refined details and calculated modularity make this residence a suitable addition to sites from the suburbs to the ski slopes.

 

 

An expandable proposal by William Samin titled “Trapezoidal Mod” took third place in the competition. The proposal divides wet and dry functions into two separate modules that can be effortlessly re-configured to adapt to shifting terrain or potential expansion. The charred exterior and warm wood cladding within provide the perfect environment to frame natural landscapes from forests and plains to meadows and mountains.

 

 

Clarence Zichen Qian was given honorable mention for his design Project “ATN,” comprised of a titled structure populated with a grid-like millwork structure to define the interior space while providing calculated vistas into the world outside.

 

 

source: Ryterna modul

 

The Futurist Fashion of Iris van Herpen

 

Iris van Herpen is a Dutch fashion designer who is widely recognized as one of fashion’s most talented and forward-thinking creators who continuously pushes the boundaries of fashion design. Renowned for her use of 3-D printing, van Herpen is widely considered one of contemporary fashion’s most progressive creators, and is a favored designer of style icons, including Beyoncé, Lady Gaga, Björk, Cara Delevingne, and others. Phoenix Art Museum is the western-most destination on the North American tour of the exhibition “Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion” (February 24, 2018 through May 13, 2018) and the last chance to see these extraordinary collections of futuristic fashions in the USA.

 

Since her first collection in 2007, van Herpen has made a name for herself within and beyond the fashion world by combining tradition with radical innovation. Unparalleled in her multidisciplinary approach to creation, she has collaborated with artists, architects, and scientists such as Philip Beesley, Jólan van der Wiel, and Bart Hess, as well as teams at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 2011, TIME Magazine included her 3-D printed dresses on its list of 50 Best Inventions.

 

Featuring 45 ensembles created from 2008 – 2015, the minimalistic installation will also include a selection of her fantastical shoe designs and runway show footage. A featured work is the dress from her 2014 collection Biopiracy, on view for the first time since it was purchased by Arizona Costume Institute to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the fashion design collection and the Museum.

 

 

 

 

 

source: phxart

From the Sky of Dubai

 

Flying high above Dubai stunning architecture, Bachir Moukarzel’s drone has captured some fascinating imagery. The “hobbyist” photographer has recently earned himself some global praise, winning the urban category award in a National Geographic contest. Dubai’s skyscrapers, marina, hotels and winding roads are seen in a new light. Watch some of Bachir’s videos shown below …

 

 

 

 

 

source: Bachir Moukarzel

 

Cal-Earth – Helping people build homes with their own two hands

 

Cal-Earth develops and educates the public in self-help, environmentally sustainable building designs. Houses anyone can build with their own two hands, using locally available earth, sandbags and barbed wire – meeting modern-day standards for safety, beauty, energy efficiency, and comfort.

 

The global housing shortage currently includes some 20-40 million refugees and displaced persons, and hundreds of millions more who live in substandard or slum housing. With compounding environmental challenges and the acceleration of natural and man-made disasters, this shortage will only become more severe in the coming decades.

 

Cal-Earth’s designs have been studied by NASA, endorsed and used by the United Nations, featured in countless world media outlets, and awarded the prestigious Aga Khan Award for Architecture. Their Superadobe building system (U.S. Patent #5,934,027) integrates traditional earth architecture with contemporary global safety requirements, and has passed severe earthquake code tests in California.

 

Based in Hesperia, California, Cal-Earth trains hundreds of people each year through on-site, international, and web-based educational programs. Their alumni have helped share earth building with communities in over 40 countries across the globe, and their workshops have been held on five continents. Youth programs at Cal-Earth foster respect for the environment and an awareness of sustainability practices.

 

Cal-Earth strives to honor the late founder Nader Khalili’s vision of architecture based on the natural elements of earth, water, air, and fire. Today, they continue his mission to provide shelter for the world’s homeless and displaced persons, empower people to participate in the creation of their own homes and communities, and help preserve the planet that we all share.

 

 

 

 

source: Cal-Earth

Andy Warhol’s First Selfies Sold

 

Andy Warhol’s first selfies recently were auctioned off by Sotheby’s. In the latter part of the twentieth-century, Andy Warhol joined the ranks of Rembrandt van Rijn, Vincent van Gogh, and Pablo Picasso to take his place amongst the most important and influential self-portraitists in the history of art. Throughout his career, he turned to his own visage to create works such as the present painting, filled with immediacy, vivacity, and sleek conceptual cool. Indeed, the present work is one of the first ten self-portraits that Warhol ever created and thus holds immense significance.

 

Warhol made Self-Portrait and the extant eight versions using images he had taken in a New York photo-booth. The use of such unconventional source material was, at this time, fiercely innovative, and added to the aura of technical invention that already surrounded this artist, who had pioneered the use of silkscreen printing in art only a couple of years previously. The lot sold for over 6 million British pounds.

 

source: Sotheby’s