LuxeLife

Rays of Light – Shaping Objects

 

UC Berkeley researchers have discovered a new light-based 3D printing technique that has the potential to transform how products from prosthetics to eyeglass lenses are designed and manufactured. Using light, the 3D printer transforms liquids into complex solid objects in only a matter of minutes. Nicknamed the “replicator” by the inventors — after the Star Trek device that can materialize any object on demand — the 3D printer can create objects that are smoother, more flexible and more complex than what is possible with traditional 3D printers. It can also encase an already existing object with new materials — for instance, adding a handle to a metal screwdriver shaft — which current printers struggle to do.

 

Most 3D printers, including other light-based techniques, build up 3D objects layer by layer.  This leads to a “stair-step” effect along the edges. They also have difficulties creating flexible objects because bendable materials could deform during the printing process, and supports are required to print objects of certain shapes, like arches. The new printer relies on a viscous liquid that reacts to form a solid when exposed to a certain threshold of light. Projecting carefully crafted patterns of light — essentially “movies” — onto a rotating cylinder of liquid solidifies the desired shape “all at once.”

 

The new printer was inspired by the computed tomography (CT) scans that can help doctors locate tumors and fractures within the body. CT scans project X-rays or other types of electromagnetic radiation into the body from all different angles. Analyzing the patterns of transmitted energy reveals the geometry of the object.

 

Besides patterning the light, which requires complex calculations to get the exact shapes and intensities right, the other major challenge faced by the researchers was how to formulate a material that stays liquid when exposed to a little bit of light, but reacts to form a solid when exposed to a lot of light.

 

The 3D printing resin is composed of liquid polymers mixed with photosensitive molecules and dissolved oxygen. Light activates the photosensitive compound which depletes the oxygen. Only in those 3D regions where all the oxygen has been used up do the polymers form the “cross-links” that transform the resin from a liquid to a solid. The objects also don’t have to be transparent. The researchers printed objects that appear to be opaque using a dye that transmits light at the curing wavelength but absorbs most other wavelengths.

 

This work was supported by UC Berkeley faculty startup funds and by Laboratory-Directed Research and Development funds from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The team has filed a patent application on the technique.

 

 

 

source: berkeley

Rockin’ the MET

 

For the first time, a major museum exhibition will examine the instruments of rock and roll at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Through more than 130 instruments dating from 1939 to 2017—Play It Loud: Instruments of Rock & Roll will explore one of the most influential artistic movements of the 20th century. Rock and roll’s seismic influence was felt across culture and society. Early rock musicians were attracted to the wail of the electric guitar and the distortion of early amplifiers, a sound that became forever associated with rock music and its defining voice. The instruments used in rock and roll had a profound impact on this art form that forever changed music.

 

“With its outstanding collection and comprehensive Department of Musical Instruments, The Met has for decades exhibited, celebrated, and contextualized the global artistic vision and extraordinary craftsmanship involved in developing musical instruments,” said Max Hollein, Director of the Museum. “Play It Loud celebrates a formative chapter in 20th-century art and culture, and the extraordinary objects featured in this presentation convey the innovation, experimentation, passion, and rebellion at the heart of rock and roll. The exhibition allows us to appreciate the artistry of the instruments as well as their powerful role in the creation and expression of rock’s legendary sound and identity.”

 

Organized thematically, Play It Loud will explore how musicians embraced and advanced emerging technologies; the phenomenon of the “Guitar Gods;” the crafting of a visual identity through the use of instruments; and the destruction of instruments in some live performances, one of rock’s most defining gestures. The exhibition will include many of rock’s most celebrated instruments, including such guitars as Jimi Hendrix’s electric guitar “Love Drops,” originally decorated by him; Eric Clapton’s “Blackie,” Eddie Van Halen’s “Frankenstein,” Jerry Garcia’s “Wolf,” and Joan Jett’s “Melody Maker,” and drums from Keith Moon’s “Pictures of Lily” drum set. By displaying several rigs used in live performances and sound recordings, the exhibition will also demonstrate how artists created their own individual sounds, and some 40 vintage posters, costumes, and performance videos will illustrate key components of the musical movement’s visual style and impact.

 

The exhibition is co-organized with the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and runs April 8 through October 1.

 

 

 

 

 

source: metmuseum

Color of the 1960s

 

New York’s Whitney Museum of American Art is set to open Spilling Over: Painting Color. The collection gathers paintings from the 1960s and early 1970s that inventively use bold, saturated, and even hallucinatory color to activate perception. During this period, many artists adopted acrylic paint—a newly available, plastic-based medium—and explored its expansive technical possibilities and wider range of hues. Color Field painters poured paint and stained unprimed canvas, dramatizing painting’s materiality and visual force. Painters associated with Op art deployed pattern, geometric arrangement, and intense color combinations. At the same historical moment, an emerging generation of artists explored color’s capacity to articulate new questions about perception, specifically its relation to race, gender, and the coding of space. The exhibition looks to the divergent ways color can be equally a formal problem and a political statement.

 

The title of the show is taken from a quote by Thompson, who shortly before his death in 1966 said, “I paint many paintings that tell me slowly that I have something inside of me that is just bursting, twisting, sticking, spilling over to get out. Out into souls and mouths and eyes that have never seen before.” Spilling Over: Painting Color demonstrates why and how painting could still matter for artists who wanted to see anew. The retrospective opens March 29 and runs through the summer.

 

 

 

source: whitney

Dynamic City Streets of the Future

 

Imagine a city street, nestled between buildings with mostly foot and bicycle traffic. During the morning and evening hours, there might be a steady stream of commuters heading to work. In the middle of the day and the evening, families might use the street as a play space. And on the weekend, the street could be cleared for a block party or a basketball game.

 

Alphabet’s Sidewalk Labs in Toronto along with the International design and innovation office CRA-Carlo Ratti Associati has worked to design The Dynamic Street, a prototype of a modular and reconfigurable paving system that hints at the possibility of the streetscape seamlessly adapting to people’s needs. The project is based on Sidewalk Labs’ extensive experience and research into street design, and affords visitors the ability to engage with up-and-coming technology concepts.

 

The Dynamic Street features a series of hexagonal modular pavers which can be picked up and replaced within hours or even minutes in order to swiftly change the function of the road without creating disruptions on the street.  This system is inspired by French research group IFSTTAR’s pilot project on removable urban pavement underway in Nantes.

 

The project explores the different patterns that can be created on the hexagonal grid as well as the integration of lights into individual pavers. Each paver can also potentially host a plug and play element – that is, vertical structures such as poles, bollards or even basketball hoops.

 

“The Dynamic Street creates a space for urban experimentation: with this project, we aim to create a streetscape that responds to citizens’ ever-changing needs,” says Carlo Ratti, founder of CRA practice and Director of the Senseable City Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT): “As autonomous vehicles are likely to start running on streets soon, we can start to imagine a more adaptable road infrastructure.”

 

 

 

source: carloratti

Salvador Dali Returns

 

The Dali Museum in St. Petersburg, Florida is set to celebrate Salvador Dali’s art and legacy with “Dali Lives,” a groundbreaking experience to be unveiled in April 2019. Visitors to the museum will have the opportunity to learn more about Dali’s life and work from the person who knew him best: the artist himself. Using an artificial intelligence (AI)-based cutting edge technique, the new “Dali Lives” experience employs machine learning to create a version of Dali’s likeness, resulting in an uncanny resurrection of the mustached master. When the experience opens, visitors will for the first time be able to interact with an engaging lifelike Salvador Dali on a series of screens throughout the Museum.

 

“Dali was prophetic in many ways and understood his historical importance,” says Dr. Hank Hine, executive director at The Dali. “He wrote, If someday I may die, though it is unlikely, I hope the people in the cafes will say, ‘Dali has died, but not entirely.’ This technology lets visitors experience his bigger-than-life personality in addition to our unparalleled collection of his works.”

 

The Museum began this immersive project by collecting and sharing hundreds of interviews, quotes, and existing archival footage from the prolific artist. These extensive materials trained an AI algorithm to “learn” aspects of Dali’s face, then looked for an actor with the same general physical characteristics of Dali’s body. The AI then generates a version of Dali’s likeness to match the actor’s face and expressions. To educate visitors while engaging with “Dali Lives,” the Museum used authentic writings from Dali himself – coupled with dynamic present-day messages – reenacted by the actor.

 

 

 

 

 

source: thedali

Student-Developed Moon Base

 

Angelus Chrysovalantis Alfatzis, an architectural engineering student at the National Technical University of Athens, Greece has gained attention for his idea for a moon base. He is one of several young researchers based at European Space Agency’s (ESA) astronaut center in Cologne, Germany, investigating Moon-related concepts as Europe prepares for future missions.

 

Alfatzis describes his architectural approach as “hyperlocal” and is drawn to extreme environments in remote places and believes that sourcing or producing materials on the Moon itself will be vital to building a sustainable lunar habitat – a view that ESA shares. “I always strive to find material and structural solutions in accordance with the resources available on-site,” he explains. “At the moment, my focus is on using unprocessed lunar soil for construction and the architectural applications of this. Our idea is to transport inflatable modules to the base of a small crater on the South Polar Region of the Moon, and then gradually fill the cavity with lunar soil, until the modules are effectively buried. Meters of shielding will protect those inside from radiation. Building inside a crater will also help insulate due to the stable temperature of the Moon’s underground environment and provides cover from the threat of micrometeoroids.”

 

Like construction on Earth, Angelus says the main purpose of lunar buildings will be to protect inhabitants from external conditions that could otherwise pose harm, and create a habitat that supports human life. But there are special considerations that must be factored into planning. Sunlight, changes in temperature, the type of terrain and the level of gravity all play a role in designing a suitable concept. Due to lack of a protective atmosphere or magnetic field, any lunar base must also protect its inhabitants from radiation and tiny meteorites that rain down overhead.

source: esa

World’s Largest Permanent Digital Art Projection

 

Chicago’s Art on theMART is the largest permanent digital art projection in the world, projecting contemporary artwork across the 2.5 acre river-façade of theMART. theMART (formerly The Merchandise Mart) is the largest privately held commercial building in the United States. It encompasses 4.2 million gross square feet, spans two city blocks, rises 25 stories, and is visited by an average of 30,000 people each business day.

 

Art on theMART’s projections are visible to the public from Wacker Dr. and along the Chicago Riverwalk two hours a night (7 – 9pm), five days a week (Wednesday – Sunday), for ten months of the year (March – December). The program content rotates every season.

 

Art on theMART launched its inaugural program on September 29, 2018, featuring commissioned works by four renowned contemporary artists, Zheng Chongbin, Jason Salavon, Diana Thater and Jan Tichy, with interstitial visuals by Obscura Digital, the creators of Art on theMART’s unique software and content display platform. “The inaugural program of Art on theMART was an invitation to artists and organizations from around the world to ideate what this platform can become,” said Art on theMART Executive Director Cynthia Noble. “We look forward to seeing what artists have envisioned for the 2019 program, and are thrilled to actualize many of those ideas and bring them to life on a grand, public scale.” The new season opens March 2019.

 

 

 

source: artonthemart

A Walking Car

 

Hyundai wowed the 2019 Consumer Electronics Show last week in Las Vegas with their new vehicle, “Elevate.” Like something out of Star Wars, wheels with robotic legs allow users to drive, walk or even climb over the most treacherous terrain.

 

In times of disaster, those first 72 hours are of upmost importance. Often the search-and-rescue missions are impeded due to the disaster . . . which led Hyundai to develop the first-ever vehicle with movable legs.

 

The design is capable of both mammalian and reptilian walking gaits, allowing it to move in any direction. The legs also fold up into a stowed drive-mode, where power to the joints is cut, and the use of an integrated passive suspension system maximizes battery efficiency. This allows Elevate to drive at highway speeds just like any other vehicle. But no other can climb a five foot wall, step over a five foot gap, walk over diverse terrain, and achieve a 15 foot wide track width, all while keeping its body and passengers completely level.

 

Design Manager, David Byron, offered a real-life scenario: “Imagine a car stranded in a snow ditch just 10 feet off the highway being able to walk or climb over the treacherous terrain, back to the road potentially saving its injured passengers – this is the future of vehicular mobility.”

 

 

 

source: hyundainews

Pop/Funk: Warhol & Frey

 

Tempe, Arizona’s ASU Art Museum is currently celebrating two influential artists of pop and funk art: Andy Warhol and Viola Frey. Both of these art rebels can be experienced together in Pop/Funk: Warhol & Frey, now exhibiting through March 23.

 

These two great counter-culture artists of the twentieth century grew out of the 1960’s on opposite coasts … Warhol on the east coast and Frey on the west coast. Both were really counter-cultural art movements that went against the norm. The majority of the work on display is actually in the ASU Art Museum’s permanent collection: Andy Warhol’s photographs and prints, and Viola Frey’s ceramics.

 

Andy Warhol elevated popular culture to high art status; similarly, Viola Frey helped elevate ceramics from being considered “craft” to fine art.

 

 

 

 

sources: asuartmuseum, statepress

Living Coral: Pantone’s Color of the Year

 

For 20 years, Pantone’s Color of the Year has influenced product development and purchasing decisions in multiple industries, including fashion, home furnishings, and industrial design, as well as product, packaging, and graphic design.

 

For 2019, Pantone has chosen Living Coral, an animating and life-affirming coral hue with a golden undertone that energizes and enlivens with a softer edge. Vibrant, yet mellow Living Coral aims to provide comfort and buoyancy in our continually shifting environment. Living Coral is a nurturing color that appears in our natural surroundings and at the same time, displays a lively presence within social media.

 

Leatrice Eiseman, Executive Director of the Pantone Color Institute explains the choice, “Color is an equalizing lens through which we experience our natural and digital realities and this is particularly true for Living Coral. With consumers craving human interaction and social connection, the humanizing and heartening qualities displayed by the convivial Pantone Living Coral hit a responsive chord.”

 

The Color of the Year selection process requires thoughtful consideration and trend analysis. To arrive at the selection each year, Pantone’s color experts at the Pantone Color Institute comb the world looking for new color influences. This can include the entertainment industry and films in production, traveling art collections and new artists, fashion, all areas of design, popular travel destinations, as well as new lifestyles, playstyles, and socio-economic conditions. Influences may also stem from new technologies, materials, textures, and effects that impact color, relevant social media platforms and even upcoming sporting events that capture worldwide attention.

 

 

 

source: pantone