LuxeLife

Huge Holograms Hovering

 

 

Six hundred laser beams, 10 million pixels of video, 20-metre-wide holograms – and one DJ. Eric Prydz is known for putting on a good show, and his latest topped even his previous efforts in both scale and impact. At a recent show that took place in London’s Victoria Park, a crowd of 15,000 soaked up an audiovisual feast of electronic music, video and lighting effects. Holograms and lasers are a trademark of Prydz’s shows, pushing innovative effects using the latest tech. There were animations building and twisting around the stage in time to the beat, holograms of astronauts, satellites and tornadoes, and lasers radiating over the crowd in every color and configuration.

 

A huge V-shaped video display forms the back wall of the stage, measuring 2304 by 576 LED pixels – more than a million in total. The illusions are cast onto the screen by four laser projectors, the outputs of which are merged to create a single image. Each projector kicks out 30,000 lumens of laser light, and as they use a laser engine instead of a bulb, explains Calvert, the brightness stays consistent for longer.

 

Creative director and VJ Liam Tomaszewski is responsible for the content of the animations. He’s been working with Prydz 2011. When Tomaszewski first started, the team used a form of holographic trickery called Pepper’s Ghost illusion, which involves carefully lighting things through a thin film. Since moving to the projection system he’s learned what works best in a hologram: using slow movement so your eyes can really focus on the image, avoiding using too much black and making sure to keep the animation inside the frame. At 4K resolution and with a frame rate of 50 fps, some of the holograms took a week to render.

 

 

 

source: wired

The Fascinating Sculpture of Rachel Whiteread

 

 

London’s Tate Museum is celebrating over 25 years of Rachel Whiteread’s internationally acclaimed sculpture. The show tracks Whiteread’s career and brings together well-known works such as Untitled (100 Spaces) 1995 and Untitled (Staircase) 2001 alongside new pieces that have never been previously exhibited.

 

 

One of Britain’s leading contemporary artists, Whiteread uses industrial materials such as plaster, concrete, resin, rubber and metal to cast everyday objects and architectural space. Her evocative sculptures range from the intimate to the monumental. Born in London in 1963, Whiteread was the first woman to win the Turner Prize in 1993. The same year she made House 1993–1994, a life-sized cast of the interior of a condemned terraced house in London’s East End, which existed for a few months before it was controversially demolished.

 

 

On the lawn outside Tate Britain a new concrete sculpture, Chicken Shed 2017, will sit during the exhibition. The exhibition runs now through January 21, 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sources: tate, wikipedia

 

The Art of Black Rock City

 

Burning Man is an annual gathering in the western United States at Black Rock City—a temporary city erected in the Black Rock Desert of northwest Nevada, approximately one hundred miles (160 km) north-northeast of Reno. The late summer event is described as an experiment in community and art, influenced by ten main principles: “radical” inclusion, self-reliance, and self-expression, as well as community cooperation, civic responsibility, gifting, decommodification, participation, immediacy, and leaving no trace.

 

The art of Black Rock City takes many forms, from cutting-edge musical performances to mighty mutant vehicles. Attendees experience light art, performance art, wearable art, and zany interactive experiences. But perhaps most famous are the iconic large installations that grace Burning Man’s expansive playa. Each year veterans and newbies alike eagerly await the massive landmarks that rise out of the massive and ancient lakebed. Towering monoliths emerge from dust storms like stalwart sentinels and transform entirely from day to night. They play host to art car parties, weddings, photo shoots and introspection. In harmony with the annual theme, they give the city a unique flavor every year.

 

At Burning Man, the community explores various forms of artistic self-expression, created in celebration for the pleasure of all participants. Participation is a key precept for the community – selfless giving of one’s unique talents for the enjoyment of all is encouraged and actively reinforced. Some of these generous outpourings of creativity can include experimental and interactive sculpture, building, performance, and art cars among other media, often inspired by the yearly theme, chosen by organizers.

 

First held 31 years ago in 1986 on Baker Beach in San Francisco as a small function organized by Larry Harvey and a group of friends, it has since been held annually, spanning from the last Sunday in August to the first Monday in September (Labor Day). Burning Man 2017 was held from August 27 to September 4.

 

 

 

 

 

 

sources: wikipedia, everfest, newatlas

Drone Attacks Hack Smart Lightbulbs

 

Hackers have recently used a drone to target a set of Philips light bulbs in an office tower, infecting the bulbs with a virus that let the attackers turn the lights on and off, and flash an “SOS” message in Morse code.

 

The attack relied on a weakness in a common wireless radio protocol called ZigBee that Philips (PHG, -0.85%) uses to make its Hue light bulbs part of an online network. The revelation comes at a time of growing concern over how the so-called Internet of things, in which ordinary devices are controlled via an online network, can turn hostile. ZigBee contains a flaw that can allow hackers to infect a lightbulb with a virus, which then spreads to other bulbs in the network. A video (shown above) of a drone with a USB stick hovers near Philips light bulbs in order to take control of them, and forces them to blink on and off.

 

Philips was alerted to the vulnerability and a patch was issued, but future hacking in this digital age of “smart” items is simply inevitable.

 

sources: fortune, theverge

Pantone Presents Prince’s Purple

 

The Prince Estate, alongside Pantone Color Institute, recently announced the creation of a standardized custom color to represent and honor international icon, Prince. The purple hue, represented by his “Love Symbol #2” was inspired by his custom-made Yamaha purple piano, which was originally scheduled to go on tour with the performer before his untimely passing at the age of 57. The color pays tribute to Prince’s indelible mark on music, art, fashion and culture.

 

Prince’s association with the color purple was galvanized in 1984 with the release of the film Purple Rain, along with its Academy Award-winning soundtrack featuring the eponymous song. While the spectrum of the color purple will still be used in respect to the “Purple One,” Love Symbol #2, will be the official color across the brand he left behind.

 

The ‘Purple One’ made a statement and challenged cultural norms through both his well-known music and personal style. In addition to the Oscar, Prince won seven Grammy Awards and a Golden Globe Award for Purple Rain. Both “Purple Rain” and “1999” were entered into the Grammy Hall of Fame, and Prince was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2004, the very first year he was eligible.

 

Laurie Pressman, Vice President of the Pantone Color Institute said: “We are honored to have worked on the development of Love Symbol #2, a distinctive new purple shade created in memory of Prince, ‘the purple one.’ A musical icon known for his artistic brilliance, Love Symbol #2 is emblematic of Prince’s distinctive style. Long associated with the purple family, Love Symbol #2 enables Prince’s unique purple shade to be consistently replicated and maintain the same iconic status as the man himself.”

 

sources: pantone, wikimedia

Thousands of Rome’s historical images digitized

 

A team including Stanford researchers digitized thousands of pieces from 19th-century archaeologist Rodolfo Lanciani’s collection to help scholars across the world study Rome’s transformation over the centuries.

 

The exhibit, which recently went online, consists of almost 4,000 digitized drawings, prints, photographs and sketches of historic Rome from the 16th to 20th centuries. The pieces were collected by renowned Roman archaeologist Rodolfo Lanciani, who sought to document the entire history of Rome’s archeology up to the end of the 19th century.

 

After Lanciani’s death in 1929, his library, which contains more than 21,000 items, was sold to the Istituto Nazionale di Archeologia e Storia dell’Arte (Italy’s National Institute of Archaeology and Art History) in Rome. Before now, reviewing the archive was much more difficult. It required a visit to the historic 15th-century Palazzo Venezia in central Rome. Lanciani’s collection is on the fourth floor and in its own dedicated room, which is open for only a few hours during weekdays. Only one folder from the collection can be viewed at a time.

 

Supported by a 2015 grant from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, the team partnered with Italy’s Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities and Tourism and the National Institute to scan and create high-resolution images of each of the thousands of materials in the collection. Each digital object was categorized and tied to a descriptive set of data, so it could be properly stored and searched online. The digital images and all associated descriptions are now permanently preserved in the Stanford Digital Repository.

 

 

 

 

 

source: stanford

From Zigong City to Milwaukee

 

Milwaukee’s China Lights 2017 festival will feature nearly 50 handmade, brilliantly lighted, giant-sized lantern displays. Each themed lantern display will be made up of more than 1,000 components. Some of the exhibits will include animation. Lanterns will range in size from about three feet to three stories high. The celebration will include two stages for Chinese folk-culture performances, two dining areas, and six new food vendors with a variety of Asian and Western menu options.

 

As part of China’s five-year economic plan, in 2015 the Sichuan Provincial Department of Commerce developed a campaign to spread Chinese traditional culture and promote cultural exchange. The custom of lighting lanterns has occurred for thousands of years, and Zigong City now boasts 380 lantern-making companies with 80,000 lantern artisans. More than 100,000 visitors are expected September 22 – October 22 at Boerner Botanical Gardens in Hales Corners, WI. (Photos shown are from last year’s 2016 festival.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

source: urbanmilwaukee

Niagara Upgrades to LED

 

The nighttime illumination of Niagara Falls recently unveiled LED lighting upgrade that replaces a 20-year-old halogen system.

 

As noted by the Niagara Falls Illumination Board, the LED enhancement — price tag: $4 million or about $3.1 million USD — will reduce related energy costs by as much as 60 percent (the new lights consume 52 killowatts of energy compared to the 126 kW used by the halogens) while illuminating the falls with a vastly larger spectrum of colors that are noticeably richer and more robust. As for the intensity and quality of the kaleidoscopic light itself, the LED luminaires shine anywhere from three to 14 times brighter than their incandescent predecessors depending on the color being projected. Compared to the previous bulbs, which sported a 1,900-hour lifespan, the LEDs will shine bright for up to 25 years.

 

The new lighting system will consist of 1400 individual luminaires broken into 350 zones of control across both falls. Each individual control zone is equipped with separate Red, Green, Blue and White LED luminaires (RGBW). When used together these separate colored RGBW luminaires will mix on the falls to create endless color combinations. The use of White LED’s in the color mixing scheme will allow one to move between deeply saturated colors to subtle hues of color to allow for more natural looking effects.

 

Over 185,000 feet of conductors will connect the 1400 individual luminaires to five 10 feet tall racks of individually addressed controllable drivers. The remote mounted drivers are indoors and easily accessible reducing the need for servicing drivers that would otherwise be internal to the luminaires out in the field.

 

 

sources: mnn, wikipedia

What is the floor saying today?

 

Philips Lighting and Tarkett recently introduced the launch of Luminous vinyl flooring. The vinyl tiles are embedded with cutting-edge LED technology that enables retailers to advertise, interact with customers and guide them through any store or building. The expressive flooring, principally aimed at retail and hospitality environments, enables the broadcast of luminous messages, animations and adverts on the vinyl floor to provide unique customer experiences and help drive sales.

 

“Increasingly light is being embedded into floors, walls and ceilings. This latest innovation with Tarkett extends this trend and offers new ways to engage shoppers, visitors and employees. Light can be used to welcome and guide people, alert them to special offers and even advertise to them. When connected to the web all kind of dynamic real-time information can be displayed and remote access allows the retailer to program multiple branches,” says Dr. Bernd Voelpel, General Manager Luminous at Philips Lighting.

 

 

 

 

source: philips

Illuminating Vancouver

 

Illumination Vancouver International Summer Night Market claims to be the largest light show in North America. Event organizers anticipate more than 300,000 people will attend this year’s massive festivities, which will stretch across 200,000 square feet of space and include live performances, more than 200 food and merchandise vendors, and thousands of glimmering lights. Running now through September 10, 2017.

 

 

 

source: illuminationBC