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Modernist Painter Rolph Scarlett – Celebrated in Seattle

 

Seattle’s Frederick Holmes and Company is currently presenting Rolph Scarlett: Legacy Lost and Found,  a comprehensive survey of Modernist painter, Rolph Scarlett (1889-1984), featuring over 40 original paintings and works on paper – non-objective, abstract, and figurative – dating from the 1930’s through the early 1960’s; the largest gallery exhibition ever presented in the Pacific Northwest.

 

Any presentation on the legacy of Scarlett has to include the history of the Guggenheim Museum’s founding, which was the peak of Scarlett’s career. Canadian-born Rolph Scarlett was one of the founding artists of Solomon Guggenheim’s original museum which opened in 1938: The Museum of Non-objective Painting. He became the third most highly collected artist among Guggenheim’s vast holdings which comprised the Museum’s permanent collection.

 

Through the Museum’s founding curator and director, Baroness Hilla Rebay’s zealous leadership and advocacy of this radical avant-garde genre of painting and philosophy, the museum became a groundbreaking institution in New York, attracting collectors, critics, and artists. Rolph Scarlett was introduced to non-objective in 1923 through a chance meeting in Geneva with Paul Klee. In 1938, after submitting a portfolio of gouaches one paper to Baroness Rebay, he was awarded a Guggenheim Grant which was enough to allow him to paint full-time. Described by Rebay as her “greatest find”, Scarlett became one of the exhibiting artists as well as a featured lecturer at the Museum on the principles of non-objective painting.

 

Today, Roph Scarlett is increasingly praised as one of the important contributors to the canon of American Modern. The exhibition is presented in cooperation with the Weinstein Collection, San Francisco, and runs through November 30.

 

 

 

 

source: frederickholmesandcompany

Major Monet Exhibition in Denver

 

The Denver Art Museum will be home to the most comprehensive U.S. exhibition of Monet paintings in more than two decades. The exhibition will feature more than 120 paintings spanning Monet’s entire career and will focus on the celebrated French impressionist artist’s enduring relationship with nature and his response to the varied and distinct places in which he worked.

 

The presentation of Claude Monet: The Truth of Nature will explore Monet’s continuous interest in capturing the quickly changing atmospheres, the reflective qualities of water and the effects of light, aspects that increasingly led him to work on multiple canvases at once. Additionally, the exhibition will examine the critical shift in Monet’s painting when he began to focus on series of the same subject, including artworks from his series of Haystacks, Poplars, Waterloo Bridge, and Waterlilies.

 

Monet traveled more extensively than any other impressionist artist in search of new motifs. His journeys to varied places including the rugged Normandy coast, the sunny Mediterranean, London, the Netherlands, and Norway inspired artworks that will be featured in the presentation. The exhibition will uncover Monet’s continuous dialogue with nature and its places through a thematic and chronological arrangement, from the first examples of artworks still indebted to the landscape tradition to the revolutionary compositions and series of his late years.

 

The exhibition will also delve into the artist’s increasing abandonment of any human presence in the landscapes he created, a testimony to his commitment to isolate himself in nature. This creative process simultaneously established an intimacy with his subject, which culminated later in Giverny, where he created his own motif through meticulous planning, planting, and nurturing of his flowers and plants, which he then translated onto the canvas.

 

Co-organized with the Museum Barberini in Germany, Denver will be the sole U.S. venue for Claude Monet: The Truth of Nature which runs from October 21, 2019 to February 2, 2020.

 

 

 

 

source: denverartmuseum

 

MIT Art-Science Project Makes $2 Million Diamond “Disappear”

 

The MIT Center for Art, Science & Technology and the New York Stock Exchange are currently presenting The Redemption of Vanity, created by artist Diemut Strebe in collaboration with MIT scientist Brian Wardle and his lab, on view at the New York Stock Exchange through November 25, 2019 by appointment only. For the work, a 16.78 carat natural yellow diamond valued at $2 million from L.J.West was coated using a new procedure of generating carbon nanotubes (CNTs), recently measured to be the blackest black ever created, which makes the diamond seem to disappear into an invisible void. The patented carbon nanotube technology (CNT) absorbs more than 99.96% of light and was developed by Professor Wardle and his necstlab lab at MIT.

 

“Any object covered with this CNT material loses all its plasticity and appears entirely flat, abbreviated/reduced to a black silhouette. In outright contradiction to this we see that a diamond, while made of the very same element (carbon) performs the most intense reflection of light on earth. Because of the extremely high light absorbtive qualities of the CNTs, any object, in this case a large diamond coated with CNT’s, becomes a kind of black hole absent of shadows,“ explains Strebe. “The unification of extreme opposites in one object and the particular aesthetic features of the CNTs caught my imagination for this art project.”

 

“Strebe’s art-science collaboration caused us to look at the optical properties of our new CNT growth, and we discovered that these particular CNTs are blacker than all other reported materials by an order of magnitude across the visible spectrum”, says Wardle. The MIT team is offering the process for any artist to use. “We do not believe in exclusive ownership of any material or idea for any artwork and have opened our method to any artist,” say Strebe and Wardle.

 

“The project explores material and immaterial value attached to objects and concepts in reference to luxury, society and to art. We are presenting the literal devaluation of a diamond, which is highly symbolic and of high economic value. It presents a challenge to art market mechanisms on the one hand, while expressing at the same time questions of the value of art in a broader way. In this sense it manifests an inquiry into the significance of the value of objects of art and the art market,” says Strebe. “We are honored to present this work at The New York Stock Exchange, which I believe to be a most fitting location to consider the ideas embedded in The Redemption of Vanity.”

 

 

 

 

source: the-redemption-of-vanity

Old Power Station Returns as Functioning Art

 

For over 60 years a power station in Luckenwalde, Germany produced and supplied coal-powered energy to its city and beyond. Under extreme political upheaval, after the Berlin Wall fell in 1989, E-WERK ceased producing power and closed. Now, nearly 30 years since the plant’s closing it is coming back to life. This time, however, instead of coal, E-WERK Luckenwalde will be powered by spruce pine woodchips provided by the leftovers from a wooden cable drum factory nearby. Besides becoming carbon neutral, it will be simultaneously turned into an art center, presenting a dynamic contemporary art program of commissions, exhibitions, performances and events.

 

As a functioning sculpture, multipurpose tool and dynamic site of production, E-WERK Luckenwalde plans on producing new forms of energy. It will open on September 14, 2019 with a quarter of the station turned on in its first month, starting with 40 kilowatts an hour (enough to power 200 homes) then gradually increase production. The initial art exhibition will bring 11 international artists together to reflect on the utopian possibilities of energy and run through March of 2020.

 

 

 

source: kunststrom

12th Annual Singapore Night Festival

 

The Singapore Night Festival just completed its 12th annual event over two weekends in August. To commemorate the Singapore Bicentennial, the festival incorporated folklore and a Southeast Asian flair into this year’s art. The façade of iconic landmarks sprung to life in dazzling brilliance in Singapore’s Bras Basah.Bugis district with more than 40 performances as well as 16 light art installations and projections cast onto the city.

 

 

 

 

 

source: singapore night festival

Hans Hofmann: The Nature of Abstraction

 

This fall, the Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) in Salem, Massachusetts is presenting a fresh perspective on Hans Hofmann.  Widely considered to be one of the most influential American artists of the 20th century, the exhibition presents the most comprehensive examination of Hans Hofmann’s innovative and prolific career to date.

 

Hans Hofmann (1880–1966) played a pivotal role in the development of Abstract Expressionism and is celebrated for his exuberant canvases. Renowned as an influential teacher for generations of artists—first in his native Germany, then in New York and Provincetown—Hofmann left an indelible legacy on painting. As a teacher and as a modern artist, Hofmann associated with many of the most notable artists, critics, and dealers of the 20th century, including Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, Wassily Kandinsky, Peggy Guggenheim, Clement Greenberg, Jackson Pollock, and many others.

 

Featuring more than 45 paintings—including works from private collections that have never been exhibited in a museum setting—Hans Hofmann: The Nature of Abstraction presents an unprecedented look at Hofmann’s studio practice, focusing on his continually experimental approach to painting and its expressive potential. The exhibition runs from September 21, 2019, through January 5, 2020

 

 

 

 

source: pem

 

Abstract Artist Yvonne Thomas – Windows and Variations

 

New York City’s Berry Campbell Gallery is celebrating the work of abstract artist Yvonne Thomas in an upcoming exhibition titled Windows and Variations: Paintings from 1963 – 1965.

 

Thomas was born in Nice, France, in 1913, and arrived with her family in the United States in 1925. After first settling in Boston, the family moved to New York, where Thomas studied briefly at Cooper Union. When her parents could not afford her tuition due to the Great Depression, she turned to commercial work, supporting herself as a fashion illustrator.

 

In 1963, a significant change occurred in the art of Yvonne Thomas. Whereas in the 1950s, she had let her paintings lead her in the ways they evolved, following their logic, she now took control of them through a more consistent and systematic approach. The works she produced concur with the ethos of the abstract art of the time. In the view that Abstract Expressionism had foreclosed the mental and preplanned methods that had been important in the art of the past, artists began to bring a conceptual ideas back into their works.

 

In her paintings from 1963 to 1965, Thomas chose as her method of inquiry a repeating pattern of footprint-like rectangles or elongated lozenges that float in loose rows against grounds that are similar in tone, or reveal related tonal modulations. The choice of a design that has a textile look to it may have derived from Thomas’s work during her early career as a fashion illustrator. Some of the works in this exhibition belong to a series called The Window, implying more of the process of looking and having a sense of distance than the direct gesturalism of Abstract Expressionism.

 

The paintings are also about the power of color. By emphasizing the unity of a work by the patterns that repeat across the entirety of a surface—even if they are not uniform—the images are meant to be read as totalities rather than compositions. It is thought that Thomas was drawing on her memories of her early years in France, as the paintings are reminiscent of the experience of the stained-glass windows in French cathedrals through which sunlight is transformed into spiritualized color. By limiting the colors in each of the paintings, Thomas makes color their subject, drawing the viewer into a consideration of how color is both associative and visceral.

 

The exhibition runs September 5 through October 5, 2019.

 

 

 

 

 

 

sources: berrycampbell, wikipedia

LEDs with Firefly-Inspired Surfaces

 

Penn State researchers are suggesting that firefly-like structures could improve the efficiency of LEDs. Fireflies and LEDs both have similar obstacles in having produced light reflecting backwards and getting lost. By texturing the surface with microstructures — microscopic projections — more light is able to escape. In most LEDs these projections are symmetrical, with identical slopes on each side. Fireflies’ lanterns also have these microstructures, but the researchers noticed that the microstructures on firefly lanterns were asymmetric. The sides slanted at different angles, giving a lopsided appearance.

 

Using asymmetrical pyramids to create microstructured surfaces, the team found that they could improve light extraction efficiency to around 90 percent. The asymmetrical microstructures increase light extraction in two ways. First, the greater surface area of the asymmetric pyramids allows greater interaction of light with the surface, so that less light is trapped. Second, when light hits the two different slopes of the asymmetric pyramids there is a greater randomization effect of the reflections and light is given a second chance to escape.

 

In conventional LEDs, the production process usually produces symmetrical pyramids because of the orientation of the sapphire crystals. The team discovered that if they cut the block of sapphire at a tilted angle, the same process would create the lopsided pyramids. By altering just one part of the production process, they believe their approach could easily be applied to commercial manufacture of LEDs. The researchers have filed for a patent on this research.

 

 

source: penn state

San Francisco’s Gregangelo Museum

 

The Gregangelo Museum is a work of installation art located in a Mediterranean-style house originally built in the early 1920s in the St. Francis Wood district of San Francisco. The house was converted into an art project during the 1980s. Though most of the twenty-seven rooms in the house have been significantly remodeled, the original 1920s architecture was intentionally salvaged. The founder, Gregangelo Herrera, owns a circus troupe and arts and entertainment company. The Gregangelo Museum was featured on HGTV in 2012, and has been cited in interior design books and television networks. Recent features of the house include Voltage TV’s World’s Weirdest Homes and Netflix’s Amazing Interiors.

 

Egyptian and Middle Eastern themed installations, mosaics, and paintings are some of the main features of the museum. The Gregangelo Museum generates its revenue by offering tours of the home to the general public. The tour starts outside of the house, and gradually makes its way up onto the second floor. On the second floor is a hidden second half of the museum called The Labyrinth, which is a series of maze-like crawl spaces. The philosophy of the house follows that each portal will bring visitors into a different existence, universe, and head-space.

 

 

 

 

source: wikipedia

Happy Vegas

 

After sold-out runs in Los Angeles, Chicago, Toronto and Boston, HAPPY PLACE is coming to Las Vegas. The exhibition opens August 23 at Mandalay Bay.

 

Founded by Jared Paul and opened originally on November 20, 2017 in Los Angeles, this massive pop-up experience is filled with larger than life size installations, multi-sensory immersive rooms, and dozens of moments curated to Capture Your Happy. Highlights include: dancing in the middle of world’s largest indoor Confetti Dome, jumping off of a larger than life rainbow into a pot of happiness, and posing inside HAPPY PLACE’s signature rubber ducky bathtub of fun. If that isn’t enough smiles, HAPPY PLACE will also feature 7-foot stilettos made of a million candies and 6-foot-tall X and O letters made out of thousands of tiny mirrors, surrounded by a wall of one thousand red lips.

 

 

 

 

source: happyplace