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Gunpowder Artist at Cleveland Museum

 

Cai Guo-Qiang: Cuyahoga River Lightning is now open at The Cleveland Museum of Art and runs through September 22, 2019. It features three monumental gunpowder works by Chinese artist Cai Guo-Qiang, known for his explosion events, gunpowder paintings, and installations, all using environmentally friendly material.

 

While Cuyahoga River Lightning: Drawing for the Cleveland Museum of Art (2018) was created especially for the exhibition, the other two exhibited works in monochrome and polychrome gunpowder illustrate the artist’s reflections on the state of our planet, wildlife, and the world’s diminishing natural reserves of fresh water.

 

This exhibition is part of a citywide commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the last Cuyahoga River fire and celebration of the progress made toward clean water for all. The river is famous for having been so polluted that it “caught fire” in 1969. The event helped to spur the environmental movement in the US.

 

 

 

sources: clevelandart, wikipedia

New Orleans Sculpture Garden Expansion Now Open

 

The New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) has opened its newly expanded Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden after 18 months in construction. The six-acre addition builds on the existing five-acre garden within New Orleans City Park and includes innovative architectural elements and showcases 27 new, recent, and commissioned large-scale sculptures.

 

The Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden occupies approximately eleven acres in City Park adjacent to the museum. Atypical of most sculpture gardens, this garden is located within a mature existing landscape of pines, magnolias and live oaks surrounding two lagoons. The garden design creates outdoor viewing spaces within this picturesque landscape. Conceived in 2003, the Besthoff Sculpture Garden has doubled in size in 2019 and has grown to now include more than 90 sculptures.

 

 

 

source: noma

Largest Permanent Kinetic Light Installation in the US

 

Hakkasan Nightclub at MGM Grand Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas is set to debut the largest permanent kinetic light installation in the United States. The multimillion-dollar 30-foot sculpture is made of 57, 4-foot seamless and sculptural triangles that combine to form a 30-foot showpiece. Connected via 169 high-precision winches, the centerpiece can transform with the nightclub’s musical landscape into infinite shapes and colors above the dance floor. Each triangle was custom-designed and 3D-printed with premium materials from the brand KINETIC LIGHTS located in Berlin, Germany and features pixel-mapping and color-mixing technologies, making the grid the only structure of its kind that allows fully-customized images and patterns to flow seamlessly across all of the triangles both individually and collectively.

 

The installation is to be unveiled during the week of Electric Daisy Carnival Las Vegas in May.

 

source: hakkasangroup

Toronto Celebrates Light

 

The Toronto Light Fest is the largest outdoor light sculpture gallery in North America. Undeterred by the frigid winter temperatures, the 2019 edition dazzled and warmed visitors with over 30 light exhibits.

 

Scattered across Toronto’s Distillery District, the third annual event succeeded with its goal of creating a positive, magical urban oasis where people of all ages and backgrounds can celebrate together.

 

Many Canadian artists’ work were on display along with international artists from Sweden, United States, Israel, Turkey, Austria, Russia, Netherlands, and Germany.

 

 

 

 

 

source: torontolightfest

The Tulip to be London’s 2nd Tallest Building


London’s city’s planning and transportation committee has just approved The Tulip. The 305-meter observation tower is to be constructed on 20 Bury Street, adjacent to 30 St Mary Axe, informally known as the Gherkin. The Tulip is designed by Foster + Partners, a British international studio for architecture and integrated design which is known for many high-profile glass-and-steel buildings. The tower will be a visitor attraction without any office space and will be London’s second tallest building. Work could start as early as 2020 with a scheduled completion date of 2025.

 

A survey completed by Londoners in December 2018 suggested that two-thirds believed the tower would be “an attractive addition to the London skyline,” but the tower has been opposed by Historic England, Historic Royal Palaces, and the Greater London Authority. Following the approval, chief executive of Historic England, Duncan Wilson, said he was disappointed with the decision and that the construction “would damage the very thing its developers claim they will deliver – tourism and views of London’s extraordinary heritage.” London airport officials also opposed the decision, claiming that the tower would be an obstruction for the air traffic control.

 

source: wikipedia

Hockney & Van Gogh in Amsterdam

 

For the first time, the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam is bringing two greats together . . . David Hockney and Vincent Van Gogh. Hockney – Van Gogh: The Joy of Nature demonstrates the influence of Van Gogh on Hockney’s work, exploring both artists’ fascination with nature, their use of bright, contrasting colors and their experimentation with perspective.

 

The landscape paintings show clear links with Van Gogh’s landscapes, such as The Harvest (1888), Field with Irises near Arles (1888) and The Garden of Saint Paul’s Hospital (‘Leaf-Fall’) (1889). The stylized vertical lines of the tree trunks in the latter work by Van Gogh are analogous to the repetitive lines in Hockney’s renowned The Arrival of Spring in Woldgate, East Yorkshire in 2011.

 

A multimedia guide, created especially for the exhibition and featuring the voice of David Hockney, takes visitors through the exhibition. In a range of guided tours (available in six languages), museum guides introduce visitors to the links between Van Gogh and Hockney. The exhibition runs through May 26, 2019.

 

 

 

source: vangoghmuseum

Rays of Light – Shaping Objects

 

UC Berkeley researchers have discovered a new light-based 3D printing technique that has the potential to transform how products from prosthetics to eyeglass lenses are designed and manufactured. Using light, the 3D printer transforms liquids into complex solid objects in only a matter of minutes. Nicknamed the “replicator” by the inventors — after the Star Trek device that can materialize any object on demand — the 3D printer can create objects that are smoother, more flexible and more complex than what is possible with traditional 3D printers. It can also encase an already existing object with new materials — for instance, adding a handle to a metal screwdriver shaft — which current printers struggle to do.

 

Most 3D printers, including other light-based techniques, build up 3D objects layer by layer.  This leads to a “stair-step” effect along the edges. They also have difficulties creating flexible objects because bendable materials could deform during the printing process, and supports are required to print objects of certain shapes, like arches. The new printer relies on a viscous liquid that reacts to form a solid when exposed to a certain threshold of light. Projecting carefully crafted patterns of light — essentially “movies” — onto a rotating cylinder of liquid solidifies the desired shape “all at once.”

 

The new printer was inspired by the computed tomography (CT) scans that can help doctors locate tumors and fractures within the body. CT scans project X-rays or other types of electromagnetic radiation into the body from all different angles. Analyzing the patterns of transmitted energy reveals the geometry of the object.

 

Besides patterning the light, which requires complex calculations to get the exact shapes and intensities right, the other major challenge faced by the researchers was how to formulate a material that stays liquid when exposed to a little bit of light, but reacts to form a solid when exposed to a lot of light.

 

The 3D printing resin is composed of liquid polymers mixed with photosensitive molecules and dissolved oxygen. Light activates the photosensitive compound which depletes the oxygen. Only in those 3D regions where all the oxygen has been used up do the polymers form the “cross-links” that transform the resin from a liquid to a solid. The objects also don’t have to be transparent. The researchers printed objects that appear to be opaque using a dye that transmits light at the curing wavelength but absorbs most other wavelengths.

 

This work was supported by UC Berkeley faculty startup funds and by Laboratory-Directed Research and Development funds from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The team has filed a patent application on the technique.

 

 

 

source: berkeley

Rockin’ the MET

 

For the first time, a major museum exhibition will examine the instruments of rock and roll at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Through more than 130 instruments dating from 1939 to 2017—Play It Loud: Instruments of Rock & Roll will explore one of the most influential artistic movements of the 20th century. Rock and roll’s seismic influence was felt across culture and society. Early rock musicians were attracted to the wail of the electric guitar and the distortion of early amplifiers, a sound that became forever associated with rock music and its defining voice. The instruments used in rock and roll had a profound impact on this art form that forever changed music.

 

“With its outstanding collection and comprehensive Department of Musical Instruments, The Met has for decades exhibited, celebrated, and contextualized the global artistic vision and extraordinary craftsmanship involved in developing musical instruments,” said Max Hollein, Director of the Museum. “Play It Loud celebrates a formative chapter in 20th-century art and culture, and the extraordinary objects featured in this presentation convey the innovation, experimentation, passion, and rebellion at the heart of rock and roll. The exhibition allows us to appreciate the artistry of the instruments as well as their powerful role in the creation and expression of rock’s legendary sound and identity.”

 

Organized thematically, Play It Loud will explore how musicians embraced and advanced emerging technologies; the phenomenon of the “Guitar Gods;” the crafting of a visual identity through the use of instruments; and the destruction of instruments in some live performances, one of rock’s most defining gestures. The exhibition will include many of rock’s most celebrated instruments, including such guitars as Jimi Hendrix’s electric guitar “Love Drops,” originally decorated by him; Eric Clapton’s “Blackie,” Eddie Van Halen’s “Frankenstein,” Jerry Garcia’s “Wolf,” and Joan Jett’s “Melody Maker,” and drums from Keith Moon’s “Pictures of Lily” drum set. By displaying several rigs used in live performances and sound recordings, the exhibition will also demonstrate how artists created their own individual sounds, and some 40 vintage posters, costumes, and performance videos will illustrate key components of the musical movement’s visual style and impact.

 

The exhibition is co-organized with the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and runs April 8 through October 1.

 

 

 

 

 

source: metmuseum

Color of the 1960s

 

New York’s Whitney Museum of American Art is set to open Spilling Over: Painting Color. The collection gathers paintings from the 1960s and early 1970s that inventively use bold, saturated, and even hallucinatory color to activate perception. During this period, many artists adopted acrylic paint—a newly available, plastic-based medium—and explored its expansive technical possibilities and wider range of hues. Color Field painters poured paint and stained unprimed canvas, dramatizing painting’s materiality and visual force. Painters associated with Op art deployed pattern, geometric arrangement, and intense color combinations. At the same historical moment, an emerging generation of artists explored color’s capacity to articulate new questions about perception, specifically its relation to race, gender, and the coding of space. The exhibition looks to the divergent ways color can be equally a formal problem and a political statement.

 

The title of the show is taken from a quote by Thompson, who shortly before his death in 1966 said, “I paint many paintings that tell me slowly that I have something inside of me that is just bursting, twisting, sticking, spilling over to get out. Out into souls and mouths and eyes that have never seen before.” Spilling Over: Painting Color demonstrates why and how painting could still matter for artists who wanted to see anew. The retrospective opens March 29 and runs through the summer.

 

 

 

source: whitney

Dynamic City Streets of the Future

 

Imagine a city street, nestled between buildings with mostly foot and bicycle traffic. During the morning and evening hours, there might be a steady stream of commuters heading to work. In the middle of the day and the evening, families might use the street as a play space. And on the weekend, the street could be cleared for a block party or a basketball game.

 

Alphabet’s Sidewalk Labs in Toronto along with the International design and innovation office CRA-Carlo Ratti Associati has worked to design The Dynamic Street, a prototype of a modular and reconfigurable paving system that hints at the possibility of the streetscape seamlessly adapting to people’s needs. The project is based on Sidewalk Labs’ extensive experience and research into street design, and affords visitors the ability to engage with up-and-coming technology concepts.

 

The Dynamic Street features a series of hexagonal modular pavers which can be picked up and replaced within hours or even minutes in order to swiftly change the function of the road without creating disruptions on the street.  This system is inspired by French research group IFSTTAR’s pilot project on removable urban pavement underway in Nantes.

 

The project explores the different patterns that can be created on the hexagonal grid as well as the integration of lights into individual pavers. Each paver can also potentially host a plug and play element – that is, vertical structures such as poles, bollards or even basketball hoops.

 

“The Dynamic Street creates a space for urban experimentation: with this project, we aim to create a streetscape that responds to citizens’ ever-changing needs,” says Carlo Ratti, founder of CRA practice and Director of the Senseable City Lab at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT): “As autonomous vehicles are likely to start running on streets soon, we can start to imagine a more adaptable road infrastructure.”

 

 

 

source: carloratti