Inspiration

Grow-On-Us Floating Landscape by Balmori Associates Installed on Gowanus Canal

 

‘Grow-On-Us’ is an experimental collaboration between New York-based Balmori Associates and the Gowanus Canal Conservancy. The project is an ongoing research program that focuses on cleaning water through phyto-remediation, desalination, and rainwater collection by means of irrigated, productive floating gardens. Balmori designed, fabricated, and launched the floating landscape in Brooklyn’s Gowanus Canal, one of the most polluted bodies of water in the United States.

 

‘Grow-On-Us’ is one in a series of ongoing projects that Balmori has designed to act as sponges for filtering and cleaning water, as well as providing small wildlife habitats within the NYC area. The floating landscape is composed of transformed metal culvert pipes. Each of the 54 test tubes isolate various plants (over 30 were selected), watering conditions (clean water through phyto-remediation, desalinate canal brackish water through evaporation and condensation and collect rainwater), and a variety of buoyant construction materials (coconut fibers, bamboo, mycelium, and matrix of recycled plastic).

 

The float has been monitored since its initial launch in mid September this year, and is being continually studied for viability. Researchers will also explore functions for ‘grow-on-us’ including its potential as a multi-functional green infrastructure: shoreline protection, biodiverse habitats, energy production, public space, etc. The project is currently funded through a US$20,000 grant received from the Cornelia & Michael Bessie foundation.

 

 

 

images by balmori associates inc

Zaha Hadid buries a museum in the peak of an Alpine mountain

 

London-based architect Zaha Hadid has completed a museum for renowned climber Reinhold Messner at the top of Alpine peak Mount Kronplatz, featuring underground galleries and a viewing platform cantilevered over a valley.

 

The Messner Mountain Museum Corones is the final installment in a series of six mountaintop museums built by Messner – the first climber to ascend all 14 mountains over 8,000 meters and to reach the summit of Mount Everest without additional oxygen.

 
Located 2,275 meters above sea level, in the heart of the popular Kronplatz ski resort in South Tyrol, Italy, the building exhibits objects, images and tools that tell the story of Messner’s life as a mountaineer.

 
Hadid designed the structure built into the side of the mountain, emerging only at certain points to offer specific views. Three large volumes appear to burst through the rock face, each featuring softly curved forms made from glass-reinforced fiber concrete. The first two form picture windows, framing views of the Peitlerkofel and Heiligkreuzkofel mountains, while the third is a balcony that projects out by six meters, offering visitors a view west towards the Ortler range.

 
More concrete forms emerge from the ground to create canopies that frame the building’s entrance. Zaha Hadid’s firm chose cast concrete to give the appearance of rock and ice shards, referencing the geology of the region. Glass-reinforced fiber concrete gives the building’s exterior a pale gray tone, while internally the panels become darker – intended to match the luster and tones of anthracite coal buried underground.

 
The walls of the building are between 40 and 50 centimeters thick in order to support the structure from the pressure of the surrounding earth, while the roof has thicknesses of up to 70 centimeters.
Inside, galleries are organized over three floors, connected by staircases that the firm described as being “like waterfalls in a mountain stream.”

 

 

 

 

 

source: dezeen

The Bulbing Light- 3D Optical Ilussion Lamps from Studio Cheha

 

Another innovative and creative design is launched from Tel Aviv- based Studio Cheha. Bulbing lights are 3D optical illusion lamps designed by Nir Chehanoswki.

 

A completely flat two-dimensional LED light source leaves an impression of a three-dimensional lamp thanks to a strong sheet of laser engraved acrylic glass that is known for its light transmitting properties. The Bulbing lamp uses an energy efficient LED to emit a warm glow that won’t overheat, and it is also visibile in daylight.

 

 

 

source: bulbing-light

 

Art is always better in real life, and it’s certainly 100% true when it comes to Lala Abaddon’s art. When looking at it online or from afar, her colorful, psychedelic pieces seem like digital creations. However when viewed up close, the user sees the intricate nature of each work of art.

 

Months in the making, Lala photographs images using analog methods, and prints them in large formats. She then goes to hand cut each print into hundreds of pieces, and then weaves the strips into complicated patterns by hand. Each strip is purposefully arranged to evoke a certain feeling in the viewer, examining the relationship between the physical world and the emotional world. The layered quality of the images is similar to alternate realities or states of being. Lala’s underlying purpose and process is “to disrupt order, reconstruct historical notions of photography and weaving, and challenge what it means to create something solely for the purpose of creation.”

 

 

 

 

via: designboom

Mary Graham Replaces False Eyelashes with Foraged Plants

 

Kingston University graduate Mary Graham has created entirely natural false eyelashes made of grass blades and pine needles. Graham turned the foliage into sets of eyelashes to highlight the fallacies of cosmetics that are labeled as “natural” – which she claims often don’t contain many naturally sourced ingredients.

 

To make the Natural lashes, she picked up grass and needles of evergreen trees from the ground at her local park and in her garden. The strands of plants were stuck together with a natural glue made from eggs and snow, which was also used to attach the lashes to the eyelids.

 

As part of her Graphic Design course at London’s Kingston University, Graham photographed a model wearing the lashes and printed the images in a magazine to look like a beauty product campaign.

 

Graham pointed out that the only unprocessed ingredient in a “natural” set of lashes made by a well-known UK pharmacy is water, and that the classification of beauty products in this way does not reflect what goes into them, as a product only has to contain one percent of natural elements to be labeled as a natural product.

 

The designer believes that the lashes, which last for less than 24 hours before they wilt, could be used for a variety of occasions, from music festivals to couture fashion shows.

 

Aside from the cost of the eggs, Graham’s lashes are free to make and she wants to encourage others to create pairs themselves.

 

She would also like to make a new range when the plants change color towards the end of the year.

 

“I want to create these lashes again but in the autumn so that I could use beautiful oranges and reds,” said Graham. “These lashes have seasons and would appear differently depending on the time of year. Almost like fashion trends, they are always changing and never constant.”

 

Graham intends to extend her line to include beauty products for the lips and skin.

 

 

 

 

 

 

New Zealand Native Builds Solar Powered, Smartphone-Controlled Skysphere

 

New Zealand native Jono Williams has built himself a habitable ‘skysphere‘ that is powered by the sun and activated by the use of smartphone apps. A cylindrical space is enclosed by a 2 meter high, 360 degree viewing window that offers panoramic views of the surrounding natural landscape. The rounded interior is supported by a towering steel column that spears through its core — a simple and multi-purpose architectural element that can be adapted to virtually any environment. A narrow shape is cut into the side of the pillar, revealing a ladder that leads up to the top floor. Encompassing the ‘apartment’ level are a a series of steel arcs that form a sphere that hovers above ground. These rods each feature a row of solar panels that bring the energy from the sun inside the luminous circular chamber.

 

Once inside, domestic elements are outfitted with technological controls and applications. These systems include a fingerprint entry motorized door; refrigerated, in-couch beer dispenser; solar powered management system; miracast projector; wireless sound system; and computer generated voice dialog. Williams has also built a custom queen size bed, added dimmable, colored mood LED lighting, high speed internet, a central ladder for entry and a rooftop starview platform.

 

 

 

 

 

source: designboom.com, photography by Jono Williams

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Sturges House – A Los Angeles Architectural Icon

 

We were thrilled to have the chance to explore this iconic building last weekend during an open house – the property is up for auction, the first time on the market in almost 50 years.

 
Commissioned by a young engineer who saw Wright’s work in  a magazine, the property has been called ‘the redwood stealth bomber’ and ‘a symbolic abstraction of the machine age through the eyes of a craftsman’.

 
Designed and built in 1939 – the only structure in Southern California built in the modern style Wright called Usonian design conceived as affordable housing for the US middle class – the one-story residence is just 1,200 square feet but features a 21-foot panoramic deck.  Wright hired renowned modernist architect John Lautner to oversee the concrete, steel, brick and redwood construction.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Australian firm John Wardle Architects developed an Inaugural Summer Architectural Commission for the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) in Melbourne that offers civic space for performances, workshops, shade and retreat. A nine-meter high and 21 meters long vibrant pink pavilion shaped to pay homage to the iconic Sidney Myer Music Bowl in Melbourne was inspired by CJ Dennis’s poem I Dips Me Lid, released to commemorate the opening of the Sydney Harbour Bridge in 1932.

 

“An iconic Melbourne building, that is an amazing, graceful, exuberant and incredibly innovative piece of civic design of that era,” John Wardle about Sydney Myer Music Bowl.

 

The structure made of steel and timber features 1,350 colorful hand-folded petal shaped pieces of polypropylene in bright pink, orange and purple that produce a radiant shade from the sun and glowing light by night. The lightweight form of the structure was developed by using 3D modeling along with leading engineering and fabrication techniques. The pavilion will be displayed in NGV International’s Grollo Equiset Garden by May 1st, 2016.

 

 

 

source: designboom.com

The Centennial Light Bulb Defies Time

 

A Fire Station at 4550 East Avenue Livermore in California, guards a special light bulb; a centennial light bulb that has been shining continuously since 1901. The bulb has been turned off just several times during its lifetime. It has been maintained by the Livermore-Pleasanton Fire Department for the last 40 years where it was relocated from the 2 miles away old fire department. During its relocation the bulb was off for 22 minutes, which was the longest time it had ever been deprived of power.

 

This Centennial light bulb is officially listed in the Guinness Book of World Records, Ripley’s Believe It or Not, and General Electric, who all agree that it is the longest-lasting bulb in the world.

 

The Centennial bulb was produced by Shelby; a company whose central focus was the durability of their products. The bulb’s longevity has been attributed to its low wattage, its perfect seal, not being turned off and on, and dedicated power supply.

 

 

 

Source via: centennialbulb.org

Javier De Riba Revives Floors Of Abandoned Buildings

 

Javier De Riba, a Barcelona-born artist and designer, spray- paints ceramic tile- like patterns on the floors of abandoned buildings,  giving them life and history. By creating these impeccably detailed patterns, he pays an homage to ceramic tiles that are typical of his homeland. These vivid patterns come from 19th-century hydraulic mosaic factories indigenous to Catalonia.