Inspiration

Hungary’s Zsolany Light Festival

 

Modern lighting artists did not disappoint at the recent three-day 2017 Zsolnay Light Festival in Pécs, Hungary. Flying airfields over 30 meters high above Széchenyi Square, impressive spectacle of light works at 26 locations attracted 60,000 visitors. The most exciting elements of the festival included 21st century mapping art, theatres, street entertainment, theatre, music and contemporary circus.

 

The winner of the Zsolnay Light Art 3D mapping competition was Ricardo Cancado from Spain with his work “Sacred Geometry.”

source: rollinginbudapest

Pantone’s Colors of 2018

 

Pantone Home + Interiors 2018 Pantone Color Institute Executive Director Leatrice Eiseman recently shared color and design trends for 2018 at the International Home + Housewares Show.

 

Eiseman studies fashion runways, the art scene, television, movies, architecture, retail, theater, food and consumer goods all over the world, tracking what hues are in, what’s out and what can be used in unique combinations to catch consumers’ eyes.

 

Among the design trends Eiseman highlighted are: our fascination with letters and words as a design element, the use of triangles in both contemporary and retro themes, dimensional diamonds and intricacy, which is likely spurred by the explosion of 3-D printing. Wood treatments have also become “very unique and really artful,” she said. And in a throwback to the 1970s, fringe is “very hot and very strong.”

 

As for general color trends or treatments, “Metallics we know are classic,” Eiseman said. “But they have really moved over into neutrals.” She also sees a continued fascination with iridescents – “The human eye can absolutely not avoid” anything iridescent, pearlized or translucent, she added.

 

Eiseman also cited a movement to more exotic or intense colors, which is a contrast to the popularity of pastels in the last few years – though those colors are not going away. “Intense colors seem to be a natural application of our intense lifestyles and thought processes these days,” she said.

 

The eight color groupings are:

 

Verdure – This palette features vegetal kinds of colors like Celery and Foliage being combined with berry-infused purples and an eggshell blue. “This palette is so symbolic of health,” said Eiseman, but it updates the profusion of greens with some bright and contrasting hues.

 

Resourceful Complementary colors on the color wheel – oranges and blues – are combined in this palette that is clever and “resourceful” in re-using and re-furbishing what consumers may already own. “This is quite an interesting color combination. It combines warm and cool tones that you just can’t avoid looking at it.”

 

Playful Speaking to our need for whimsy, the Playful palette is out-of-the ordinary and quirky. The colors are “bright-hearted more than light-hearted” with names to match, like Minion Yellow, Lime Popsicle, Green Flash and adventurous blue Skydiver.

 

Discretion – Low-key and subtle, Discretion is the opposite of Playful. Nostalgic hues such as Elderberry, Burnished Lilac and Hawthorne Rose combine with strengthening tones to offer newness to a subtle palette.

 

Far-fetched – This palette “reaches out and embraces many different cultures,” said Eiseman. It refreshingly combines three popular rosy tones with Iced Coffee and Ruby Wine, as well as a few earthy tones such as Cornsilk yellow.

 

Intricacy – This palette reflects the popularity of intricate designs . It features the “new neutrals,” aka metallics, but a florid Holly Berry Red and yellow Sulfur add a layer of drama.

 

Intensity – Providing an eclectic mix of colors, Intensity conveys “a certain strength, power, depth and sophistication,” said Eiseman. Coolly composed shades of plum, blue and blue-green quell the fires of orange Emberglow, Molten Lava and Bossa Nova. Golds and black complete the palette.

 

TECH-nique – In a nod to the proliferation of technology, this palette features hues “that seem to shine from within.” Colors include a vibrant blue, green, fushia and purple, along with iridescent peacock tones in both turquoise and hot pink, which are offset by Brilliant White and Frosted Almond.

 

 

sources: homeaccentstoday, pantone

Build your own miniature Frank Lloyd Wright building

 

 

 

Here’s your chance to build Frank Lloyd Wright’s Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum with your own hands—in miniature, that is. Thanks to Lego, which released an adorable model of the architectural wonder earlier this spring, Wright fans and building enthusiasts alike can assemble a tiny version of the iconic New York institution out of 744 plastic pieces specially designed to capture its curves.

 

The model also includes an adjoining tan office tower that was part of Wright’s original design but wasn’t built until 1992. Arch and bow bricks make up the swooping lines of the main rotunda and the rounded edges of the base. Even the porthole side windows are represented, as well as little taxis—rendered as two yellow bricks each—and other street details.

 

 

sources: lego, curbed

The Inaugural Toronto Light Festival

 

The inaugural Toronto Light Festival officially launched on January 27th at the Distillery District in downtown Toronto and ran until March 12th. The event featured 21 light-based installations by both local and international artists that were located both inside and outside of the Distillery’s buildings.

 

The idea behind the event is to not only showcase local and international artists, but to provide entertainment and inspiration to locals by pulling them out of their winter hibernation during the cold months and onto the streets to enjoy the sights.

 

 

 

 

sources: blogto, torontoguardian

Harpa Light Organ

 

As part of the Sónar Festival Reykjavík, Reactify collaborated with Atli Bollason, Owen Hindley and Jonas Johansson to create a light organ that allowed people to ‘play’ the lights on the side of the Harpa Concert Hall.

 

Building on Hindley and Bollason’s work from previous years where they allowed people to play Harpa Pong, and featuring the animation work of many other talented visual artists, the light organ was the latest addition to the repertoire of how people can interact with the look and feel of this beautiful building at the heart of Reykjavik’s culture.

 

source: reactifymusic

Circuit Marker – Drawing Magic

 

Japanese infrastructure company Kandenko, who is involved in many fields including electrical and telecommunication, has a fun video featuring an AgIC pen, which allows you to draw ink that instantly conducts electricity over paper. The circuit marker has silver-based conductive ink that dries and becomes conductive immediately on circuit paper – allowing you to draw your own circuit and turn LEDs or motors on. The charming artistic appeal of the pen is illustrated in all its magical glory in this short promotional video called, “Future with bright lights.”

 

 

source: agic.cc

 

British Airways’ Happiness Blanket

 

British Airways recently experimented with a “happiness blanket” – a high-tech comforter that measured and illuminated a passenger’s mood in red and blue via woven fiber optics. Although the blankets didn’t become a lasting feature for the airline, they collected unique data on how flyers responded to various flight stages, and how their services could be enhanced.

 

source: British Airways

Every Refrigerator Tells a Story

 

Crowded with notes, photos, memories, souvenirs and magnets; every refrigerator tells a story. The latest exhibition at Center for Architecture Sarasota (CFAS), Human Tales on Refrigerator Doors, Sweet Sparkman Architects and the master students of UF CityLab-Sarasota finally give the refrigerator door the spotlight it deserves.

 

Featuring seven vintage doors in the show, the architects and students celebrated not only the natural geography of Florida, but the architectural history and traditions singular to the area and placed aspiring architectural students into the built environment to work with seasoned professionals.

 

 

sources: CFAS, srqmagazine, sarasotamagazine

Dramatic Projection Display at Chicago’s Merchandise Mart

 

The Merchandise Mart, one of Chicago’s most important landmarks, will soon become a magnificent visual display that lights up a major portion of the downtown area.

 

In 2018, a massive projection screen will display images and videos across the entire expanse of the Mart’s riverfront side. The idea was first proposed in 2014 by Mayor Emanuel’s team and the tourism bureau of Chicago.

 

Construction on the Merchandise Mart was completed in 1930, and it was once the largest building in the world at the time it was erected. Known for its iconic art deco style, the Mart houses floors and floors of space for art galleries, special exhibitions, and vendors.

 

This plan is one of many in the downtown area to increase tourism with creative urban planning, recreational space, and public art. The unique display might liken Chicago to cities like Paris or Las Vegas that are known for their massive displays. The privately-funded project at the Merchandise Mart might be the first of a handful of buildings in the city that might be used for visual projections.

 

source: urbanmatter

The ‘Flying House’

 

With a love of aviation, a pilot in South Korea felt the sky was the limit for his vision of the perfect home. He commissioned architect HyoMan Kim of IROJE KHM to bring his ‘Flying House’ idea to life.

 

The house, near the Incheon Airport in South Korea, is not completely futuristic. It has its roots in a traditional Korean house to provide a feeling of being grounded. In contrast , the floating roof looks ready to take flight. The house features an extended area of lawn that slopes up one side of the house to a rooftop landscape which allows the occupants to stroll through the different levels outside the house. This allows the home to coexist with the nature and form a landscape hill providing a balance between the land and the sky.

 

Key features on the interior include a contemporary version of a conversation pit – a large seating area with a heated stone floor. To help reduce construction costs, structural materials, including the concrete framework and block walls, were left exposed on the interior.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sources: Stuff, Sergio Pirrone (photos)