Inspiration

Lighting Pompeii with Sun-Like LEDs

 

Seoul Semiconductor’s natural spectrum LEDs recently were used for a lighting project to illuminate the restored murals of the Casa dei Vettii in the ruins of the ancient city of Pompeii, Italy. The lighting project was undertaken by the Lumen Center Italia (LCI), which specified the SunLike Series natural spectrum LEDs because they produce light that closely matches the spectrum of natural sunlight, which conveys the colors and textures of the restored murals accurately as they would naturally appear.

 

LCI developed spotlights that employ nine units of 25W COB-type SunLike Series natural spectrum LEDs. The LEDs reproduce the spectrum of sunlight as closely as possible to show the color of the object as it appears in natural light and provide a good sense of depth based on high contrast ratio to accurately represent the murals. LCI has also illuminated art works master pieces in the Vatican Museums, Pinacoteca Ambrosiana and others, including: Leonardo da Vinci’s Codex Atlanticus, the paintings of Botticelli, Tiziano, and Bruegel.

 

source: seoulsemico

Lego Goes Green

 

 

Production has started on a range of sustainable LEGO elements made from plant-based plastic sourced from sugarcane. The new sustainable LEGO ‘botanical’ elements will come in varieties including leaves, bushes and trees. The move is part of the LEGO Group’s commitment to use sustainable materials in core products and packaging by 2030.

 

The new sustainable LEGO elements are made from polyethylene, which is a soft, durable and flexible plastic, and while they are based on sugar-cane material, they are technically identical to those produced using conventional plastic. The elements have been tested to ensure the plant-based plastic meets the high standards for quality and safety that the LEGO Group has.

 

“LEGO products have always been about providing high quality play experiences giving every child the chance to shape their own world through inventive play. Children and parents will not notice any difference in the quality or appearance of the new elements, because plant-based polyethylene has the same properties as conventional polyethylene,” said Tim Brooks.

 

source: lego

Ron Arad: Out of the Box

 

Ron Arad’s constant experimentation with the possibilities of materials such as steel, aluminum or polyamide and his radical re-conception of the form and structure of furniture has put him at the forefront of contemporary design and architecture.

 

Born in Tel Aviv in 1951, educated at the Jerusalem Academy of Art and later at the Architectural Association in London, Ron Arad co-founded with Caroline Thorman the design and production studio One Off in 1981 and later, in 1989, Ron Arad Associates architecture and design practice. In 2008 Ron Arad Architects was established alongside Ron Arad Associates. From 1994 to 1999 he established the Ron Arad Studio, design and production unit in Como, Italy. He was Professor of Design Product at the Royal College of Art in London up until 2009. Ron Arad was awarded the 2011 London Design Week Medal for design excellence and was became a Royal Academician of the Royal Academy of Arts in 2013.

 

Arad’s career as a designer began with the Rover chair, a leather car seat of a Rover V8 2L anchored on a tubular steel frame. Alongside his limited edition studio work, Arad designs for many leading international companies including Kartell, Vitra, Moroso, Fiam, Driade, Alessi, Cappellini, Cassina, WMF and Magis among many others. He has designed a number of Public Art pieces, most recently the Vortext in Seoul, Korea, and the Kesher Sculpture at Tel Aviv University.

 

Arad designed the ToHA office complex in Tel Aviv, under construction until 2018. Once completed, it will be the tallest skyscraper in Israel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sources: ronarad, wikipedia

 

LIGHT UP LA – STUDIO EVENT APRIL 5, 2018

 

 

 

It was a beautiful sunny LA day as the West Coast design community visited us for our annual LIGHT UP LA Open House.

 

We always enjoy showing off our headquarters to new design partners and welcoming friends returning to see what’s new!

 

Our guests had a sneak preview of our new Spring ’18 Luxe Light & Home collections ahead of their official release at High Point Spring Market – the GRAMERCY midcentury starburst of brass or nickel and Brazilian Quartz crystal is already a hit! And the delightful ARABELLE was her fabulous sparkling self! See the Luxe site for all the options – and of course we can customize the designs to fit your project.

 

Talking of custom, our visitors also enjoyed tours of our 85,000 sqft factory and design offices  where we create our Lusive signature custom lighting for hospitality, contract and residential applications worldwide.

 

Our inhouse artisans conducted an interactive gold leafing workshop and then we all mingled together in our beautiful studios, sipping on signature Elusive Sidecar cocktails as the sun went down…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Futurist Fashion of Iris van Herpen

 

Iris van Herpen is a Dutch fashion designer who is widely recognized as one of fashion’s most talented and forward-thinking creators who continuously pushes the boundaries of fashion design. Renowned for her use of 3-D printing, van Herpen is widely considered one of contemporary fashion’s most progressive creators, and is a favored designer of style icons, including Beyoncé, Lady Gaga, Björk, Cara Delevingne, and others. Phoenix Art Museum is the western-most destination on the North American tour of the exhibition “Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion” (February 24, 2018 through May 13, 2018) and the last chance to see these extraordinary collections of futuristic fashions in the USA.

 

Since her first collection in 2007, van Herpen has made a name for herself within and beyond the fashion world by combining tradition with radical innovation. Unparalleled in her multidisciplinary approach to creation, she has collaborated with artists, architects, and scientists such as Philip Beesley, Jólan van der Wiel, and Bart Hess, as well as teams at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 2011, TIME Magazine included her 3-D printed dresses on its list of 50 Best Inventions.

 

Featuring 45 ensembles created from 2008 – 2015, the minimalistic installation will also include a selection of her fantastical shoe designs and runway show footage. A featured work is the dress from her 2014 collection Biopiracy, on view for the first time since it was purchased by Arizona Costume Institute to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the fashion design collection and the Museum.

 

 

 

 

 

source: phxart

From the Sky of Dubai

 

Flying high above Dubai stunning architecture, Bachir Moukarzel’s drone has captured some fascinating imagery. The “hobbyist” photographer has recently earned himself some global praise, winning the urban category award in a National Geographic contest. Dubai’s skyscrapers, marina, hotels and winding roads are seen in a new light. Watch some of Bachir’s videos shown below …

 

 

 

 

 

source: Bachir Moukarzel

 

Cal-Earth – Helping people build homes with their own two hands

 

Cal-Earth develops and educates the public in self-help, environmentally sustainable building designs. Houses anyone can build with their own two hands, using locally available earth, sandbags and barbed wire – meeting modern-day standards for safety, beauty, energy efficiency, and comfort.

 

The global housing shortage currently includes some 20-40 million refugees and displaced persons, and hundreds of millions more who live in substandard or slum housing. With compounding environmental challenges and the acceleration of natural and man-made disasters, this shortage will only become more severe in the coming decades.

 

Cal-Earth’s designs have been studied by NASA, endorsed and used by the United Nations, featured in countless world media outlets, and awarded the prestigious Aga Khan Award for Architecture. Their Superadobe building system (U.S. Patent #5,934,027) integrates traditional earth architecture with contemporary global safety requirements, and has passed severe earthquake code tests in California.

 

Based in Hesperia, California, Cal-Earth trains hundreds of people each year through on-site, international, and web-based educational programs. Their alumni have helped share earth building with communities in over 40 countries across the globe, and their workshops have been held on five continents. Youth programs at Cal-Earth foster respect for the environment and an awareness of sustainability practices.

 

Cal-Earth strives to honor the late founder Nader Khalili’s vision of architecture based on the natural elements of earth, water, air, and fire. Today, they continue his mission to provide shelter for the world’s homeless and displaced persons, empower people to participate in the creation of their own homes and communities, and help preserve the planet that we all share.

 

 

 

 

source: Cal-Earth

Neon Paradise in London

 

Owned by 43-year-old artist Marcus Bracey, a studio in East London, called ‘God’s Own Junkyard’, houses the collection of four generations of his family who have made, bought and displayed neon works.

 

Marcus opened the gallery with his father Chris in 2008. Chris Bracey has been the ‘Neon Man’ for 37 years creating iconic art pieces for David la Chappelle, Martin Creed, etc. With a cult following in London and Los Angeles, Bracey has made, installed and collected signs that have appeared in countless films including Eyes Wide Shut, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and Batman.

 

The earliest pieces in the showroom date back to the 1950s, when Marcus’s grandfather left his job as a miner in Wales to join a lighting company and eventually make signs for carnivals across Britain. Bracey’s new works, which take around six weeks to make with neon moulded over 800 degree burners, now sit alongside those of his 17-year-old daughter Amber, a graffiti artist and next in line to take over the family business.

 

 

 

 

 

Google’s Synchronized Lighting Display in Berlin

 

Google recently partnered with U.K.-based energy and data-harvesting pioneer Pavegen to make Berlin’s 2017 Festival of Lights interactive. The footsteps of visitors to the world’s largest single energy harvesting array were converted into off-grid electrical energy, enabling a synchronized lighting display. Footsteps of visitors to the record-breaking 26-square meter installation set off 176 light panels embedded in the walls of this installation. Their unique moments were then captured and shared as video GIFs and stills by a photo pod at the end of the array.

 

This is the first time that Google has exhibited at the Berlin Festival of Lights. The headline event, which attracts upwards of two million guests in the heart of Germany’s cultural capital, is a celebration of the visual arts with ambitious and dynamic light installations bringing to life the city’s most famous places.

 

 

 

 

 

source: pavegen

Huge Holograms Hovering

 

 

Six hundred laser beams, 10 million pixels of video, 20-metre-wide holograms – and one DJ. Eric Prydz is known for putting on a good show, and his latest topped even his previous efforts in both scale and impact. At a recent show that took place in London’s Victoria Park, a crowd of 15,000 soaked up an audiovisual feast of electronic music, video and lighting effects. Holograms and lasers are a trademark of Prydz’s shows, pushing innovative effects using the latest tech. There were animations building and twisting around the stage in time to the beat, holograms of astronauts, satellites and tornadoes, and lasers radiating over the crowd in every color and configuration.

 

A huge V-shaped video display forms the back wall of the stage, measuring 2304 by 576 LED pixels – more than a million in total. The illusions are cast onto the screen by four laser projectors, the outputs of which are merged to create a single image. Each projector kicks out 30,000 lumens of laser light, and as they use a laser engine instead of a bulb, explains Calvert, the brightness stays consistent for longer.

 

Creative director and VJ Liam Tomaszewski is responsible for the content of the animations. He’s been working with Prydz 2011. When Tomaszewski first started, the team used a form of holographic trickery called Pepper’s Ghost illusion, which involves carefully lighting things through a thin film. Since moving to the projection system he’s learned what works best in a hologram: using slow movement so your eyes can really focus on the image, avoiding using too much black and making sure to keep the animation inside the frame. At 4K resolution and with a frame rate of 50 fps, some of the holograms took a week to render.

 

 

 

source: wired