Inspiration

From the Sky of Dubai

 

Flying high above Dubai stunning architecture, Bachir Moukarzel’s drone has captured some fascinating imagery. The “hobbyist” photographer has recently earned himself some global praise, winning the urban category award in a National Geographic contest. Dubai’s skyscrapers, marina, hotels and winding roads are seen in a new light. Watch some of Bachir’s videos shown below …

 

 

 

 

 

source: Bachir Moukarzel

 

Cal-Earth – Helping people build homes with their own two hands

 

Cal-Earth develops and educates the public in self-help, environmentally sustainable building designs. Houses anyone can build with their own two hands, using locally available earth, sandbags and barbed wire – meeting modern-day standards for safety, beauty, energy efficiency, and comfort.

 

The global housing shortage currently includes some 20-40 million refugees and displaced persons, and hundreds of millions more who live in substandard or slum housing. With compounding environmental challenges and the acceleration of natural and man-made disasters, this shortage will only become more severe in the coming decades.

 

Cal-Earth’s designs have been studied by NASA, endorsed and used by the United Nations, featured in countless world media outlets, and awarded the prestigious Aga Khan Award for Architecture. Their Superadobe building system (U.S. Patent #5,934,027) integrates traditional earth architecture with contemporary global safety requirements, and has passed severe earthquake code tests in California.

 

Based in Hesperia, California, Cal-Earth trains hundreds of people each year through on-site, international, and web-based educational programs. Their alumni have helped share earth building with communities in over 40 countries across the globe, and their workshops have been held on five continents. Youth programs at Cal-Earth foster respect for the environment and an awareness of sustainability practices.

 

Cal-Earth strives to honor the late founder Nader Khalili’s vision of architecture based on the natural elements of earth, water, air, and fire. Today, they continue his mission to provide shelter for the world’s homeless and displaced persons, empower people to participate in the creation of their own homes and communities, and help preserve the planet that we all share.

 

 

 

 

source: Cal-Earth

Neon Paradise in London

 

Owned by 43-year-old artist Marcus Bracey, a studio in East London, called ‘God’s Own Junkyard’, houses the collection of four generations of his family who have made, bought and displayed neon works.

 

Marcus opened the gallery with his father Chris in 2008. Chris Bracey has been the ‘Neon Man’ for 37 years creating iconic art pieces for David la Chappelle, Martin Creed, etc. With a cult following in London and Los Angeles, Bracey has made, installed and collected signs that have appeared in countless films including Eyes Wide Shut, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, and Batman.

 

The earliest pieces in the showroom date back to the 1950s, when Marcus’s grandfather left his job as a miner in Wales to join a lighting company and eventually make signs for carnivals across Britain. Bracey’s new works, which take around six weeks to make with neon moulded over 800 degree burners, now sit alongside those of his 17-year-old daughter Amber, a graffiti artist and next in line to take over the family business.

 

 

 

 

 

Google’s Synchronized Lighting Display in Berlin

 

Google recently partnered with U.K.-based energy and data-harvesting pioneer Pavegen to make Berlin’s 2017 Festival of Lights interactive. The footsteps of visitors to the world’s largest single energy harvesting array were converted into off-grid electrical energy, enabling a synchronized lighting display. Footsteps of visitors to the record-breaking 26-square meter installation set off 176 light panels embedded in the walls of this installation. Their unique moments were then captured and shared as video GIFs and stills by a photo pod at the end of the array.

 

This is the first time that Google has exhibited at the Berlin Festival of Lights. The headline event, which attracts upwards of two million guests in the heart of Germany’s cultural capital, is a celebration of the visual arts with ambitious and dynamic light installations bringing to life the city’s most famous places.

 

 

 

 

 

source: pavegen

Huge Holograms Hovering

 

 

Six hundred laser beams, 10 million pixels of video, 20-metre-wide holograms – and one DJ. Eric Prydz is known for putting on a good show, and his latest topped even his previous efforts in both scale and impact. At a recent show that took place in London’s Victoria Park, a crowd of 15,000 soaked up an audiovisual feast of electronic music, video and lighting effects. Holograms and lasers are a trademark of Prydz’s shows, pushing innovative effects using the latest tech. There were animations building and twisting around the stage in time to the beat, holograms of astronauts, satellites and tornadoes, and lasers radiating over the crowd in every color and configuration.

 

A huge V-shaped video display forms the back wall of the stage, measuring 2304 by 576 LED pixels – more than a million in total. The illusions are cast onto the screen by four laser projectors, the outputs of which are merged to create a single image. Each projector kicks out 30,000 lumens of laser light, and as they use a laser engine instead of a bulb, explains Calvert, the brightness stays consistent for longer.

 

Creative director and VJ Liam Tomaszewski is responsible for the content of the animations. He’s been working with Prydz 2011. When Tomaszewski first started, the team used a form of holographic trickery called Pepper’s Ghost illusion, which involves carefully lighting things through a thin film. Since moving to the projection system he’s learned what works best in a hologram: using slow movement so your eyes can really focus on the image, avoiding using too much black and making sure to keep the animation inside the frame. At 4K resolution and with a frame rate of 50 fps, some of the holograms took a week to render.

 

 

 

source: wired

The Fascinating Sculpture of Rachel Whiteread

 

 

London’s Tate Museum is celebrating over 25 years of Rachel Whiteread’s internationally acclaimed sculpture. The show tracks Whiteread’s career and brings together well-known works such as Untitled (100 Spaces) 1995 and Untitled (Staircase) 2001 alongside new pieces that have never been previously exhibited.

 

 

One of Britain’s leading contemporary artists, Whiteread uses industrial materials such as plaster, concrete, resin, rubber and metal to cast everyday objects and architectural space. Her evocative sculptures range from the intimate to the monumental. Born in London in 1963, Whiteread was the first woman to win the Turner Prize in 1993. The same year she made House 1993–1994, a life-sized cast of the interior of a condemned terraced house in London’s East End, which existed for a few months before it was controversially demolished.

 

 

On the lawn outside Tate Britain a new concrete sculpture, Chicken Shed 2017, will sit during the exhibition. The exhibition runs now through January 21, 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sources: tate, wikipedia

 

The Art of Black Rock City

 

Burning Man is an annual gathering in the western United States at Black Rock City—a temporary city erected in the Black Rock Desert of northwest Nevada, approximately one hundred miles (160 km) north-northeast of Reno. The late summer event is described as an experiment in community and art, influenced by ten main principles: “radical” inclusion, self-reliance, and self-expression, as well as community cooperation, civic responsibility, gifting, decommodification, participation, immediacy, and leaving no trace.

 

The art of Black Rock City takes many forms, from cutting-edge musical performances to mighty mutant vehicles. Attendees experience light art, performance art, wearable art, and zany interactive experiences. But perhaps most famous are the iconic large installations that grace Burning Man’s expansive playa. Each year veterans and newbies alike eagerly await the massive landmarks that rise out of the massive and ancient lakebed. Towering monoliths emerge from dust storms like stalwart sentinels and transform entirely from day to night. They play host to art car parties, weddings, photo shoots and introspection. In harmony with the annual theme, they give the city a unique flavor every year.

 

At Burning Man, the community explores various forms of artistic self-expression, created in celebration for the pleasure of all participants. Participation is a key precept for the community – selfless giving of one’s unique talents for the enjoyment of all is encouraged and actively reinforced. Some of these generous outpourings of creativity can include experimental and interactive sculpture, building, performance, and art cars among other media, often inspired by the yearly theme, chosen by organizers.

 

First held 31 years ago in 1986 on Baker Beach in San Francisco as a small function organized by Larry Harvey and a group of friends, it has since been held annually, spanning from the last Sunday in August to the first Monday in September (Labor Day). Burning Man 2017 was held from August 27 to September 4.

 

 

 

 

 

 

sources: wikipedia, everfest, newatlas

Pantone Presents Prince’s Purple

 

The Prince Estate, alongside Pantone Color Institute, recently announced the creation of a standardized custom color to represent and honor international icon, Prince. The purple hue, represented by his “Love Symbol #2” was inspired by his custom-made Yamaha purple piano, which was originally scheduled to go on tour with the performer before his untimely passing at the age of 57. The color pays tribute to Prince’s indelible mark on music, art, fashion and culture.

 

Prince’s association with the color purple was galvanized in 1984 with the release of the film Purple Rain, along with its Academy Award-winning soundtrack featuring the eponymous song. While the spectrum of the color purple will still be used in respect to the “Purple One,” Love Symbol #2, will be the official color across the brand he left behind.

 

The ‘Purple One’ made a statement and challenged cultural norms through both his well-known music and personal style. In addition to the Oscar, Prince won seven Grammy Awards and a Golden Globe Award for Purple Rain. Both “Purple Rain” and “1999” were entered into the Grammy Hall of Fame, and Prince was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2004, the very first year he was eligible.

 

Laurie Pressman, Vice President of the Pantone Color Institute said: “We are honored to have worked on the development of Love Symbol #2, a distinctive new purple shade created in memory of Prince, ‘the purple one.’ A musical icon known for his artistic brilliance, Love Symbol #2 is emblematic of Prince’s distinctive style. Long associated with the purple family, Love Symbol #2 enables Prince’s unique purple shade to be consistently replicated and maintain the same iconic status as the man himself.”

 

sources: pantone, wikimedia

Thousands of Rome’s historical images digitized

 

A team including Stanford researchers digitized thousands of pieces from 19th-century archaeologist Rodolfo Lanciani’s collection to help scholars across the world study Rome’s transformation over the centuries.

 

The exhibit, which recently went online, consists of almost 4,000 digitized drawings, prints, photographs and sketches of historic Rome from the 16th to 20th centuries. The pieces were collected by renowned Roman archaeologist Rodolfo Lanciani, who sought to document the entire history of Rome’s archeology up to the end of the 19th century.

 

After Lanciani’s death in 1929, his library, which contains more than 21,000 items, was sold to the Istituto Nazionale di Archeologia e Storia dell’Arte (Italy’s National Institute of Archaeology and Art History) in Rome. Before now, reviewing the archive was much more difficult. It required a visit to the historic 15th-century Palazzo Venezia in central Rome. Lanciani’s collection is on the fourth floor and in its own dedicated room, which is open for only a few hours during weekdays. Only one folder from the collection can be viewed at a time.

 

Supported by a 2015 grant from the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, the team partnered with Italy’s Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities and Tourism and the National Institute to scan and create high-resolution images of each of the thousands of materials in the collection. Each digital object was categorized and tied to a descriptive set of data, so it could be properly stored and searched online. The digital images and all associated descriptions are now permanently preserved in the Stanford Digital Repository.

 

 

 

 

 

source: stanford

Niagara Upgrades to LED

 

The nighttime illumination of Niagara Falls recently unveiled LED lighting upgrade that replaces a 20-year-old halogen system.

 

As noted by the Niagara Falls Illumination Board, the LED enhancement — price tag: $4 million or about $3.1 million USD — will reduce related energy costs by as much as 60 percent (the new lights consume 52 killowatts of energy compared to the 126 kW used by the halogens) while illuminating the falls with a vastly larger spectrum of colors that are noticeably richer and more robust. As for the intensity and quality of the kaleidoscopic light itself, the LED luminaires shine anywhere from three to 14 times brighter than their incandescent predecessors depending on the color being projected. Compared to the previous bulbs, which sported a 1,900-hour lifespan, the LEDs will shine bright for up to 25 years.

 

The new lighting system will consist of 1400 individual luminaires broken into 350 zones of control across both falls. Each individual control zone is equipped with separate Red, Green, Blue and White LED luminaires (RGBW). When used together these separate colored RGBW luminaires will mix on the falls to create endless color combinations. The use of White LED’s in the color mixing scheme will allow one to move between deeply saturated colors to subtle hues of color to allow for more natural looking effects.

 

Over 185,000 feet of conductors will connect the 1400 individual luminaires to five 10 feet tall racks of individually addressed controllable drivers. The remote mounted drivers are indoors and easily accessible reducing the need for servicing drivers that would otherwise be internal to the luminaires out in the field.

 

 

sources: mnn, wikipedia