Events

Texting Colors Warm Up Boston’s Winter

 

“Color Commons,” created by New American Public Art, is a series of 24-foot “light blades” lining Boston’s Wharf District parks. When someone sends a text, the server sends the message to the microcontroller. Whether it’s a color or the ciphered message, the microcontroller translates the text to a trigger code which changes the colors of the Light Blades.

 

By activating Color Commons, New American Public Art and The Rose Kennedy Greenway Conservancy hope to make Boston a more playable city, one where existing urban infrastructure can be reused in ways that enhance person-to-city and person-to-person connections. In 2016, The Greenway made a commitment to playability through their hire of a full-time Play Coordinator. Both groups hope to continue their collaborations to put Boston on the map of cities across the globe that have joined the movement to make their urban spaces more playable. Color Commons will be on display through Winter 2017.

 

 

 

source: newamericanpublicart

DPA Lighting – Illuminated Beauty for Mike Stoane Lighting Event

 

 

German designers Tommaso Gimigliano and Ingo Kalecinski of dpalighting won kudos for their entry in Mike Stoane’s Lighting ‘Park Event’. The annual London based event challenges design teams to use a box of mystery components – and their imagination – to create an illuminated object or fixture.

 
Using the available items including LED modules, Gimigliano and Kalecinski were able to create a battery-operated ‘wearable aura’ of light, bringing fashion and illumination together. The team designed their creation ‘The NeckLED’ to instill wellbeing and define the boundaries of a personal micro-cosmos of warmth and comfort.

 

 

 

Santiago Calatrava’s Turning Torso Wins CTBUH’s Award – 10 Years After Completion

 

Rotating a full 90 degrees along nine pentagonal sections, Santiago Calatrava’s “Turning Torso” was deemed the world’s first twisting skyscraper upon its completion in 2005. Still Scandinavia’s tallest tower, the 190-meter Malmö skyscraper has recently been awarded a 10 Year Award by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) for its continued value to the surrounding area and successful performance across a number of categories, including environmental, engineering performance, vertical transport, iconography, and others.

 

The CTBUH Awards are an independent review of building projects, judged by a panel of industry experts. Projects are recognized for making an extraordinary contribution to the advancement of tall buildings and the urban environment, and for achieving sustainability at the broadest level.

 

Turning Torso was featured in the CTBUH Best Tall Buildings Book, as well as celebrated at the CTBUH Annual Awards Symposium, which took place at the Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago.

 

source: CTBUH

Sydney Opera House Finally in Possession of Le Corbusier’s Wool Tapestry

 

In 1958, a year after  Danish architect Jørn Utzon won the international competition for the  Sidney Opera House,  he acquired the wool tapestry from the famous architect Charles-Édouard Jeanneret-Gris, known as Le Corbusier. A 6.5 sq.m. tapestry, Les Dés Sont Jetés (The Dice Are Cast) involved the city features and architectural details of the planned Opera House.

 

Utzon and his wife thanked  Le Corbusier  for the tapestry in a beautiful letter they wrote in 1960.  Part of the letter said:
“For quite some time we have intended to write to you again in order to tell you how extremely happy we are for your wonderful tapestry. It is a daily source of delight and beauty not only for ourselves and our children but for all our friends and guests, too.

 

In 1966, a year after Le Corbusier`s death, Utzon quit the Opera House project dissatisfied with the Australian authorities who wanted to decorate the interior quickly and on a low-cost . Sydney’s Opera House was opened in 1973, but without  Le Corbusier’s tapestry or Utzon’s interior design.

 

Utzon was re-engaged by the Opera House Trust in 1999 when he completed the plans and design principles for the evolving building in collaboration with his son Jan.

 

Now, 57 years after  Utzon’s work on this project and 7 years after his death, his dream will be accomplished and Le Corbusier’s tapestry will finally be placed where it should have been all these years.

 

The Sydney Opera House bought the tapestry from the Danish auction house Bruun Rasmussen during the auction of Utzon’s art collection. The tapestry cost more than $400,000 and the  money donated by philanthropists made this purchase possible.  From now on it will hang in the main box office foyer of the Sydney Opera House.

 

sources: goldmarkart, srh.com.au

Moreau Kusunoki Architects’ “Art in the city” Wins The Awaited Guggenheim Helsinki Competition

 

After a year of shortlisting and refining, Moreau Kusunoki Architects from Paris has been selected amongst six finalists as the winner of the Guggenheim Helsinki competition.

 

Moreau Kusunoki Architects’ design project “Art in the city” includes several pavillions finished in the dark clad with concave roofs that will be connected by a series of garden patios. The patios will be used as a meeting point and can serve as a gallery exhibition space.  The design project also includes the waterfront, a park and a nearby urban area- all the qualities that jury conceptualized for the design. A lookout tower will rise from one side of the building, providing views of the waterfront.  The tower with a glazed top will also illuminate the tip of the scene in the manner of a lighthouse during the night.

 

The jury, chaired by Professor Mark Wigley, found the design highly respectful for the setting, the city grid and the needs of the society. “Art in the city” could become a future meeting point and an urban blend of people and art in Finland’s capital.

 

 

 

 

source: dezeen

Kobe Luminarie – Festival of Lights

 

For two weeks in December Kobe, Japan becomes a winter wonderland of lights.
Known as the Kobe Luminarie, the light show is a memorial to the Great Hanshin earthquake of 1995. The first show that year, under the banner ‘Dreams and Light’, was held as a message of hope to celebrate the city’s remarkable recovery.

 
Now an annual event, over 200,000 individually hand painted lights, donated by the Italian Government, are lit each year in the city’s Old Foreign Settlement, Produced by designers Valerio Festi and Hirokazu Imaoka each year has a new theme and attracts 5 million visitors.

 

 

 

 

source: mymodernnet

Diwali festival of lights

 

Diwali, festival of lights, is an ancient Hindu festival that takes place each year between mid-October and mid-November. Deepawali or Diwali is the largest, and the brightest of all Hindu festivals officially celebrated in Fiji, Guyana, India, Malaysia, Mauritius, Nepal, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago. The festival is marked for five days of celebration, whereas each day is distinguished by a different tradition.

 

Before the Diwali night people clean, renovate and decorate their houses with diyas, lamps and candles and create design patterns called rangoli on the floor using colored powders or sand. On the third night of Diwali, families gather in Lakshmi Puja, a traditional family prays to Lakshmi, a Hindu goddess of wealth and prosperity. The Lakshmi Puja is followed by mouth-watering feasts and fireworks.

 

The fourth day of Diwali, Padva is dedicated to wife–husband relationship, while Bhau-Beej, the last day festival is dedicated to sister–brother bond when brothers visit their married sisters who welcome them with love and a lavish meal.

 

 

 

source: national geographic

Accommodation inside the Bauhaus Dessau

 

Bauhaus,  a famous German Modernist design school that operated from 1919 to 1933 reconstructed its Studio Building dormitories for visitors, who can now spend a night in an authentic room and enhance their Dessau Museum experience.

 

Studio Building is the structure of 28 studio flats of about 24 squaremeters that was a residence of junior masters and promising students.  One room has been designed with authentic furniture following the original setting while others have been decorated and personalised with the design products of their former inhabitants, including Marcel Breuer, Josef and Anni Albers, Hannes Mayer and Joost Schmidt, Franz Erlich, Marianne Brandt and Gertrud Arndt.

 

Guest use communal bathrooms and showers just like the residents in the 1920s did. The room prices range from 35€ for single room to 60€ for double room on weekends.

 

 

 

 

 

 

source: bauhaus-dessau.de

Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa from Sanaa, Tokyo, will Design the new Art Gallery of New South Wells in Sidney, Australia

 

The new Art Gallery of New South Wells in Sydney, which is expected to be built in 2021 will be designed by the Japanese firm Saana. Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa are the names behind the firm, and they were in strong competition with great architects of today  including Renzo Piano, Herzog & de Meuron, David Chipperfield and Kengo Kuma.

 

Saana’s design has been selected as five shortlisted architects;  Kengo Kuma& associates, Kerry Hill Architects, RMA Architects and Sean Godsell Architects. The director of Art Gallery NSW, Michael Branda and architects Toshiko Mori, Glenn Murcutt and Juhani Pallasmaa made the jury.

 

The structure is designed as a series of pavillions cascading towards Sydney Harbour and framing the new public plaza. The new space will be expanded north of the existing  Art Gallery NSW building and it will make the city’s eastern cultural zone. The new building will more than double the gallery’s permanent exhibition space and it will also hold the temporary exhibition space, education rooms, an expansive research archive, restaurants and cafes.

 

 

sources: dailytelegraph.com.au  aasarchitecture.com.au

Leo Villareal’s Multiverse

 

 

Multiverse, the largest and most complex light sculpture created by American artist Leo Villareal. Visitors pass through the Concourse walkway between the East and West Buildings of the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. The work features approximately 41,000 computer-programmed LED (light-emitting diode) nodes that run through channels along the 200-foot-long space. Development of this LED project began in 2005, and installation took place between September and December 2008.

 

Villareal’s work features movement and light, qualities that make this installation particularly well suited for the Gallery’s underground walkway, an area through which thousands of people pass daily. Once the appropriate hardware was installed in the existing architecture, the artist programmed sequences through his custom-designed software to create abstract configurations of light. His programming both instructs the lights and allows for an element of chance. While it is possible that a pattern will repeat during a viewer’s experience, it is highly unlikely. Still, the eye will seek patterns in the motion, a perceptual effect of the hypnotic trailing lights.

 

Throughout the last four decades a growing number of artists have explored the use of light to frame and create spaces in the built environment.

 

 

 

source: supertightstuff.com