Events

Yayoi Kusama’s Infinity Mirror Rooms on Tour

 

Yayoi Kusama is one of Japan’s most important contemporary artists. Her legendary 65-year career of multi-reflective installations, paintings, sculptures, drawings has left people in awe.

 

In 1965, Kusama began utilizing mirrors to transcend the physical limitations of her own productivity and achieve the repetition that is crucial to her paintings and Accumulations. Sculptural, architectural, and performative, these installations blur the line between artistic disciplines and create a participatory experience by casting the visitor as the subject of the work.

 

Focusing on the evolution of her immersive “Infinity Mirror Rooms,” the most significant North American tour of Kusama’s work in nearly two decades began at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden (23 February – 14 May 2017) before travelling to its current home … Seattle Art Museum (30 June – 10 September 2017), Followed by The Broad in Los Angeles (October 2017 – January 2018), Art Gallery of Ontario (March – May 2018) and the Cleveland Museum of Art (July – October 2018).

 

 

 

 

 

 

sources: seattleartmuseum, yayoi-kusama

 

Street-embedded pedestrian lights

 

The Netherlands is shaping up to become the world leader in street-embedded pedestrian lights. The town of Bodegraven began a pilot project testing LED traffic signals in the sidewalks. The latest project involves strips of colored lights deployed at the border of the sidewalk and intersection. Glowing green or red, the lights will let pedestrians know when to walk or stop.

 

The idea is that since the illuminated lines are right in the pavement, they’ll be seen by texting walkers with their heads down. Right now, the LED strips are only being tested at a single intersection, but its designers at local company HIG Traffic Systems see the potential for future expansion.

 

This comes several months after the village of Eerbeek installed glowing crosswalks. Lighted Zebra Crossing replaced the usual light-reflecting paint with illuminated light boxes, making them practically unmissable for approaching drivers.

 

Connected directly to a city’s existing streetlight system or solar panels, the rugged lighting strips draw very little power and can be embedded directly in the road’s asphalt or pavers. The system can also be augmented by adding a range of sensors measuring the number—and speed—of walkers and vehicles crossing it.

 

 

source: curbed

Hungary’s Zsolany Light Festival

 

Modern lighting artists did not disappoint at the recent three-day 2017 Zsolnay Light Festival in Pécs, Hungary. Flying airfields over 30 meters high above Széchenyi Square, impressive spectacle of light works at 26 locations attracted 60,000 visitors. The most exciting elements of the festival included 21st century mapping art, theatres, street entertainment, theatre, music and contemporary circus.

 

The winner of the Zsolnay Light Art 3D mapping competition was Ricardo Cancado from Spain with his work “Sacred Geometry.”

source: rollinginbudapest

Apple Soars in Dubai with Solar Wings

 

Apple recently premiered its newest store in the Middle East, Apple Dubai Mall, with a 186-foot curved storefront and balcony overlooking Burj Khalifa and the Dubai Fountain. Envisioned as a space for the community to gather, learn and be entertained, Apple Dubai Mall will also serve as a venue to watch the spectacular evening fountain shows and will host Apple’s new global in-store experience, “Today at Apple.”

 

“We view our stores as a modern-day town square, where visitors come to shop, be inspired, learn or connect with others in their community,” said Angela Ahrendts, Apple’s senior vice president, Retail. “And what better place to come together than overlooking Dubai’s epicenter, where the Dubai Fountain, Burj Khalifa and Dubai Mall meet. We are so honored to have a home at one of the world’s most incredible and dynamic intersections.”

 

Like many of Apple’s other significant stores, Apple Dubai Mall aims to be open and transparent, blurring the barriers between inside and out, to erase the boundaries between the store and the community. To mitigate Dubai’s climate, Foster + Partners designed eighteen 37.5-foot-high motorized “Solar Wings” that respond to the ever-changing environmental conditions. When the sun is at its hottest they cool the store, and in the evenings they open to welcome everyone to the public terrace. Inspired by the the traditional Arabic Mashrabiya, each “Solar Wing” is locally fabricated from 340 carbon fiber reinforced polymer rods, and at 180 feet wide, the 18 panels make up one of the world’s largest kinetic art installations.

 

Apple’s first two stores in the United Arab Emirates have welcomed more than 4 million visitors since opening in Dubai and Abu Dhabi 18 months ago. Apple will reach even more visitors from around the world at Dubai Mall, Emaar’s flagship mega-project and the world’s most-visited retail and lifestyle destination, welcoming over 80 million visitors for the past three consecutive years. Apple’s location overlooking the lake will stay open as late as midnight to everyone exploring the area.

 

 

source: apple

Pantone’s Colors of 2018

 

Pantone Home + Interiors 2018 Pantone Color Institute Executive Director Leatrice Eiseman recently shared color and design trends for 2018 at the International Home + Housewares Show.

 

Eiseman studies fashion runways, the art scene, television, movies, architecture, retail, theater, food and consumer goods all over the world, tracking what hues are in, what’s out and what can be used in unique combinations to catch consumers’ eyes.

 

Among the design trends Eiseman highlighted are: our fascination with letters and words as a design element, the use of triangles in both contemporary and retro themes, dimensional diamonds and intricacy, which is likely spurred by the explosion of 3-D printing. Wood treatments have also become “very unique and really artful,” she said. And in a throwback to the 1970s, fringe is “very hot and very strong.”

 

As for general color trends or treatments, “Metallics we know are classic,” Eiseman said. “But they have really moved over into neutrals.” She also sees a continued fascination with iridescents – “The human eye can absolutely not avoid” anything iridescent, pearlized or translucent, she added.

 

Eiseman also cited a movement to more exotic or intense colors, which is a contrast to the popularity of pastels in the last few years – though those colors are not going away. “Intense colors seem to be a natural application of our intense lifestyles and thought processes these days,” she said.

 

The eight color groupings are:

 

Verdure – This palette features vegetal kinds of colors like Celery and Foliage being combined with berry-infused purples and an eggshell blue. “This palette is so symbolic of health,” said Eiseman, but it updates the profusion of greens with some bright and contrasting hues.

 

Resourceful Complementary colors on the color wheel – oranges and blues – are combined in this palette that is clever and “resourceful” in re-using and re-furbishing what consumers may already own. “This is quite an interesting color combination. It combines warm and cool tones that you just can’t avoid looking at it.”

 

Playful Speaking to our need for whimsy, the Playful palette is out-of-the ordinary and quirky. The colors are “bright-hearted more than light-hearted” with names to match, like Minion Yellow, Lime Popsicle, Green Flash and adventurous blue Skydiver.

 

Discretion – Low-key and subtle, Discretion is the opposite of Playful. Nostalgic hues such as Elderberry, Burnished Lilac and Hawthorne Rose combine with strengthening tones to offer newness to a subtle palette.

 

Far-fetched – This palette “reaches out and embraces many different cultures,” said Eiseman. It refreshingly combines three popular rosy tones with Iced Coffee and Ruby Wine, as well as a few earthy tones such as Cornsilk yellow.

 

Intricacy – This palette reflects the popularity of intricate designs . It features the “new neutrals,” aka metallics, but a florid Holly Berry Red and yellow Sulfur add a layer of drama.

 

Intensity – Providing an eclectic mix of colors, Intensity conveys “a certain strength, power, depth and sophistication,” said Eiseman. Coolly composed shades of plum, blue and blue-green quell the fires of orange Emberglow, Molten Lava and Bossa Nova. Golds and black complete the palette.

 

TECH-nique – In a nod to the proliferation of technology, this palette features hues “that seem to shine from within.” Colors include a vibrant blue, green, fushia and purple, along with iridescent peacock tones in both turquoise and hot pink, which are offset by Brilliant White and Frosted Almond.

 

 

sources: homeaccentstoday, pantone

Auckland Harbour Bridge set to be illuminated


The Auckland Harbour Bridge will be set in lights in a bold plan poised to transform the city’s skyline and create a global attraction. The $10 million project will see the bridge illuminated with lights powered by solar energy. It is believed to be the first major bridge in the world to have all its lighting powered entirely by solar power from 630 panels installed on top of North Wharf in Wynyard Quarter.

 

The bridge will join world monuments like the Sydney Opera House, Eiffel Tower, Empire State Building and Dubai’s Burj Khalifa skyscraper, which all light up in customized displays. Often the lights are set to match a holiday or in solidarity of a tragic event.

 

Every light – using half the energy of standard lighting – will be individually controlled, allowing colors to change. The planning, consenting and installation of nearly 90,000 LED lights and 200 floodlights is expected to take several months. It is hoped the lights will be turned on before the end of 2017.

 

Lighting the bridge represents the next phase of a 10-year partnership between Vector and Auckland Council. The New Zealand Transport Agency, which manages the bridge infrastructure, says it is pleased to support the project. “The bridge has been an integral part of the city since it was built more than 50 years ago and we’re delighted to be using sustainable resources to bring it to life at night,” says NZTA chief executive Fergus Gammie.

 

 The bridge under construction in 1958

The bridge north-west from the Sky Tower

 

sources: wikipedia, nzherald

The Inaugural Toronto Light Festival

 

The inaugural Toronto Light Festival officially launched on January 27th at the Distillery District in downtown Toronto and ran until March 12th. The event featured 21 light-based installations by both local and international artists that were located both inside and outside of the Distillery’s buildings.

 

The idea behind the event is to not only showcase local and international artists, but to provide entertainment and inspiration to locals by pulling them out of their winter hibernation during the cold months and onto the streets to enjoy the sights.

 

 

 

 

sources: blogto, torontoguardian

Off-balanced and wonderfully surreal

 

London-based Child Studio, which was set up by Chieh Huang and Alexey Kostikov earlier this year, designed the lamps to appear “as if frozen in time.” Shown at the recent Milan design week, the lights appear to have been caught in the middle of sliding or rolling down wooden plinths of various shapes and sizes.

 

According to the designers, the lighting references the surrealist paintings of Giorgio de Chirico. “The ambiguous scale and striking silhouettes of the pieces give them an architectural quality,” said the studio. “The project invites the viewer to pause and to reflect on their perception of time within the physical environment.”

 

The pair used colored and lacquered ash wood for the lights’ bases, which include sloping circular plinths and scoop-shaped supports that the lamps appear to be rolling into. Each base features a different finish, with some revealing the underlying grain of the wood and others polished to a high gloss.

 

“It was important for us to find an authentic and interesting way to present our work in Milan as the design week is dominated by big brands,” they explained. “It is getting hard for independent designers to participate and show their work so it was essential we found somewhere unique.”

 

 

source: dezeen

Harpa Light Organ

 

As part of the Sónar Festival Reykjavík, Reactify collaborated with Atli Bollason, Owen Hindley and Jonas Johansson to create a light organ that allowed people to ‘play’ the lights on the side of the Harpa Concert Hall.

 

Building on Hindley and Bollason’s work from previous years where they allowed people to play Harpa Pong, and featuring the animation work of many other talented visual artists, the light organ was the latest addition to the repertoire of how people can interact with the look and feel of this beautiful building at the heart of Reykjavik’s culture.

 

source: reactifymusic

NASA researches LEDs

 

NASA has researched the advantages of LED lighting systems within the spacecraft environment. The Solid-State Lighting Module (SSLM) is designed to replace a General Luminaire Assembly (GLA) unit on the International Space Station (ISS). Identical to the GLA in fit and form, the SSLM temporarily replaced a GLA on ISS. The crew was asked to complete a brief evaluation regarding the quality of the light output and the usefulness of the dimming feature. The SSLM measures 26.5″ x 6.6″ x 3.9″ and has a mass of approximately 7.5 pounds.

 

Three ground-based studies were completed on visual performance, color discrimination, and melatonin (melatonin promotes sleepiness) suppression in healthy human subjects under different SSLA light exposure conditions inside a high-fidelity replica of the ISS crew quarters (CQ). Color discrimination tests showed no significant differences in color discrimination for indirect daylight, fluorescent room light, and SSLA light in the CQ. Also, there were no significant differences in score or time for subjects performing contrast tests. Presently, the data demonstrate that bright white Solid-State Lighting Module-Research (SSLM-R) light supports visual performance and color discrimination equivalently to typical indoor exposures to indirect daylight and overhead fluorescent light. In addition, increasing exposures to SSLA inside the CQ elicit increasingly stronger melatonin suppressions in healthy volunteers. The findings demonstrate the feasibility of doing controlled studies on visual, neuroendocrine and circadian responses in a high fidelity replica of an ISS component.

 

Early studies represent a start towards quantifying the broader range of visual, biological and behavioral responses to light once the current fluorescent lighting system is replaced by solid-state lighting. The data reported here begin to address long-duration space exploration, and the rapid development of solid-state lighting that will ultimately revolutionize how our public facilities, work places and homes are illuminated in the coming decades. Similar to some of the astronauts, a significant portion of the global population suffers from chronic sleep loss or circadian-related disorders. By refining multipurpose lights for astronaut safety, health and well-being in spaceflight, the door is opened for new lighting strategies that can be evolved for use on Earth.

 

 

source: NASA