Events

Field of Light in Paso Robles

 

Internationally-acclaimed British artist Bruce Munro has premiered his largest artwork to date—an enormous multi-acre walk-through installation—at Sensorio in Paso Robles, California. Bruce Munro: Field of Light at Sensorio is comprised of an array of over 58,800 stemmed spheres lit by fiber-optics, gently illuminating the landscape in subtle blooms of morphing color that describe the undulating landscape. Powered by solar, the stunning exhibition will captivate visitors, inviting them to engage with the landscape and environment through an ethereal light-based and sculptural experience. Tickets are currently available through January 2020.

 

Munro is best known for immersive large-scale light-based installations inspired largely by his interest in shared human experience. Recording ideas and images in sketchbooks has been his practice for over 30 years. By this means he has captured his responses to stimuli such as music, literature, science, and the world around him for reference, reflection, and subject matter. This tendency has been combined with a liking for components and an inventive urge for reuse, coupled with career training in manufacture of light. As a result Munro produces both monumental temporary experiential artworks as well as intimate story-pieces.

 

Sensorio, the intersection of art, technology and nature, will be a destination for entertainment, exploration, meditation, adventure and delight. Sensorio will honor the natural topography of the landscape and offer a wide range of amusing, mystical and kinetic experiences. The Central California destination launches with the interactive light installation by Bruce Munro, as other exhibits and buildings are put into place for an expected opening in 2021. Future attractions at Sensorio will include a hotel and conference center.

 

sources: sensoriopaso, brucemunro

 

Theirry Mutler in Montreal

 

The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) is currently presenting the very first exhibition on the work of French creator Thierry Mugler. Initiated, produced and circulated by the MMFA, this retrospective reveals the multiple worlds of this irrepressible artistic figure – at once visionary couturier, director, photographer and perfumer – by revisiting his prêt-à-porter and haute couture creations.

 

Thierry Mugler: Couturissime brings together more than 150 garments made between 1977 and 2014, most of which are being shown for the first time, as well as a wealth of unpublished archival documents and sketches. One hundred or so photographs by such world-renowned fashion photographers as Helmut Newton, Sarah Moon, Pierre et Gilles, David LaChapelle, Paolo Roversi, Herb Ritts, Dominique Issermann, Guy Bourdin and Richard Avedon, to name a few, round out the show. Each of the immersive galleries has been designed in collaboration with talented artist-designers and set designers, including Michel Lemieux, Philipp Fürhofer and Rodeo FX.

 

The exhibition runs through September 8, 2019.

 

 

 

source: mmfa

Exhibition in Nashville by Provocative Artist Diana Al-Hadid

 

Frist Art Museum in Nashville recently opened Diana Al-Hadid: Sublimations. Visually extravagant and conceptually provocative, Diana Al-Hadid’s sculptures, wall panels, and drawings are inspired by a range of sources, from art and architectural history to mythology and literature from around the world. Transforming the vestiges of such inheritances into improvised assemblages, intricate fields of dripping gypsum, and partially articulated human figures, Al-Hadid meditates on cycles of dissipation and renewal within and among cultures. Just as the word sublimation denotes a chemical transformation from one state of being into another, her work suggests changes wrought by time, as substance mutates into sensation and thought.

 

Works in this exhibition revisit archetypal narratives that depict the female body in psychologically limiting terms, which Al-Hadid challenges, transforms, or dissolves. These legacies are often shaped by male desire and fantasy, inviting an alternate reading of sublimation as envisioned by Sigmund Freud, who used the word to define the transfer of energy from negative behavior—frequently involving unacceptable sexual impulses—to more wholesome outlets. In exploring these dual aspects of sublimation, Al-Hadid reimagines cultural legacies of complexity, irony, turbulence, and beauty.

 

The exhibition runs through September 2, 2019.

 

 

 

source: firstartmuseum

Textiles of Frank Lloyd Wright

 

NYC’s The Met Fifth Avenue is currently presenting Frank Lloyd Wright Textiles: The Taliesin Line, 1955–60. The installation runs through April 5, 2020.

 

In 1955, the renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright launched the first commercial venture of his long and eminent career, designing a line of affordable home products for the general consumer. The designs for the fabrics and wallpapers, based on Wright’s architectural vocabulary and inspired by specific buildings, were featured in a sample book, Schumacher’s Taliesin Line of Decorative Fabrics and Wallpapers Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright (1955). Only 100 copies of the sample book were printed and were available exclusively to authorized dealers.

 

This installation presents the book and nine examples of the fabric it introduced, all from the original line produced by F. Schumacher and Co. In addition to the textiles that reflect the signature Wright aesthetic, the installation also includes two examples of Wright-designed wooden vases that were made in a very limited number and never reached the open market.

 

 

 

source: metmuseum

 

Gunpowder Artist at Cleveland Museum

 

Cai Guo-Qiang: Cuyahoga River Lightning is now open at The Cleveland Museum of Art and runs through September 22, 2019. It features three monumental gunpowder works by Chinese artist Cai Guo-Qiang, known for his explosion events, gunpowder paintings, and installations, all using environmentally friendly material.

 

While Cuyahoga River Lightning: Drawing for the Cleveland Museum of Art (2018) was created especially for the exhibition, the other two exhibited works in monochrome and polychrome gunpowder illustrate the artist’s reflections on the state of our planet, wildlife, and the world’s diminishing natural reserves of fresh water.

 

This exhibition is part of a citywide commemoration of the 50th anniversary of the last Cuyahoga River fire and celebration of the progress made toward clean water for all. The river is famous for having been so polluted that it “caught fire” in 1969. The event helped to spur the environmental movement in the US.

 

 

 

sources: clevelandart, wikipedia

New Orleans Sculpture Garden Expansion Now Open

 

The New Orleans Museum of Art (NOMA) has opened its newly expanded Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden after 18 months in construction. The six-acre addition builds on the existing five-acre garden within New Orleans City Park and includes innovative architectural elements and showcases 27 new, recent, and commissioned large-scale sculptures.

 

The Sydney and Walda Besthoff Sculpture Garden occupies approximately eleven acres in City Park adjacent to the museum. Atypical of most sculpture gardens, this garden is located within a mature existing landscape of pines, magnolias and live oaks surrounding two lagoons. The garden design creates outdoor viewing spaces within this picturesque landscape. Conceived in 2003, the Besthoff Sculpture Garden has doubled in size in 2019 and has grown to now include more than 90 sculptures.

 

 

 

source: noma

Largest Permanent Kinetic Light Installation in the US

 

Hakkasan Nightclub at MGM Grand Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas is set to debut the largest permanent kinetic light installation in the United States. The multimillion-dollar 30-foot sculpture is made of 57, 4-foot seamless and sculptural triangles that combine to form a 30-foot showpiece. Connected via 169 high-precision winches, the centerpiece can transform with the nightclub’s musical landscape into infinite shapes and colors above the dance floor. Each triangle was custom-designed and 3D-printed with premium materials from the brand KINETIC LIGHTS located in Berlin, Germany and features pixel-mapping and color-mixing technologies, making the grid the only structure of its kind that allows fully-customized images and patterns to flow seamlessly across all of the triangles both individually and collectively.

 

The installation is to be unveiled during the week of Electric Daisy Carnival Las Vegas in May.

 

source: hakkasangroup

Toronto Celebrates Light

 

The Toronto Light Fest is the largest outdoor light sculpture gallery in North America. Undeterred by the frigid winter temperatures, the 2019 edition dazzled and warmed visitors with over 30 light exhibits.

 

Scattered across Toronto’s Distillery District, the third annual event succeeded with its goal of creating a positive, magical urban oasis where people of all ages and backgrounds can celebrate together.

 

Many Canadian artists’ work were on display along with international artists from Sweden, United States, Israel, Turkey, Austria, Russia, Netherlands, and Germany.

 

 

 

 

 

source: torontolightfest

Hockney & Van Gogh in Amsterdam

 

For the first time, the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam is bringing two greats together . . . David Hockney and Vincent Van Gogh. Hockney – Van Gogh: The Joy of Nature demonstrates the influence of Van Gogh on Hockney’s work, exploring both artists’ fascination with nature, their use of bright, contrasting colors and their experimentation with perspective.

 

The landscape paintings show clear links with Van Gogh’s landscapes, such as The Harvest (1888), Field with Irises near Arles (1888) and The Garden of Saint Paul’s Hospital (‘Leaf-Fall’) (1889). The stylized vertical lines of the tree trunks in the latter work by Van Gogh are analogous to the repetitive lines in Hockney’s renowned The Arrival of Spring in Woldgate, East Yorkshire in 2011.

 

A multimedia guide, created especially for the exhibition and featuring the voice of David Hockney, takes visitors through the exhibition. In a range of guided tours (available in six languages), museum guides introduce visitors to the links between Van Gogh and Hockney. The exhibition runs through May 26, 2019.

 

 

 

source: vangoghmuseum

Rockin’ the MET

 

For the first time, a major museum exhibition will examine the instruments of rock and roll at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. Through more than 130 instruments dating from 1939 to 2017—Play It Loud: Instruments of Rock & Roll will explore one of the most influential artistic movements of the 20th century. Rock and roll’s seismic influence was felt across culture and society. Early rock musicians were attracted to the wail of the electric guitar and the distortion of early amplifiers, a sound that became forever associated with rock music and its defining voice. The instruments used in rock and roll had a profound impact on this art form that forever changed music.

 

“With its outstanding collection and comprehensive Department of Musical Instruments, The Met has for decades exhibited, celebrated, and contextualized the global artistic vision and extraordinary craftsmanship involved in developing musical instruments,” said Max Hollein, Director of the Museum. “Play It Loud celebrates a formative chapter in 20th-century art and culture, and the extraordinary objects featured in this presentation convey the innovation, experimentation, passion, and rebellion at the heart of rock and roll. The exhibition allows us to appreciate the artistry of the instruments as well as their powerful role in the creation and expression of rock’s legendary sound and identity.”

 

Organized thematically, Play It Loud will explore how musicians embraced and advanced emerging technologies; the phenomenon of the “Guitar Gods;” the crafting of a visual identity through the use of instruments; and the destruction of instruments in some live performances, one of rock’s most defining gestures. The exhibition will include many of rock’s most celebrated instruments, including such guitars as Jimi Hendrix’s electric guitar “Love Drops,” originally decorated by him; Eric Clapton’s “Blackie,” Eddie Van Halen’s “Frankenstein,” Jerry Garcia’s “Wolf,” and Joan Jett’s “Melody Maker,” and drums from Keith Moon’s “Pictures of Lily” drum set. By displaying several rigs used in live performances and sound recordings, the exhibition will also demonstrate how artists created their own individual sounds, and some 40 vintage posters, costumes, and performance videos will illustrate key components of the musical movement’s visual style and impact.

 

The exhibition is co-organized with the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame and runs April 8 through October 1.

 

 

 

 

 

source: metmuseum