Events

Warhol Auctioned on Blockchain

 

 

For the first time ever, a multi-million dollar tokenised artwork, Andy Warhol’s 14 Small Electric Chairs (1980), has been sold to qualified participants on Maecenas, an art investment platform built on blockchain, in the private beta launch of the platform. Facilitated in partnership with London-based Dadiani Syndicate, a fine art gallery, the cryptocurrency auction attracted over 800 sign-ups within weeks, several times the expected number.

 

It is the first time that a high-profile artwork from an internationally renowned artist has been tokenised and auctioned successfully using blockchain technology. The highest bid in the Dutch auction was US$6.5 million and more than 6 million ART tokens were used by the Ethereum smart contract during the auction. Maecenas was successful in achieving its main goal for this private beta launch, which was to validate the end-to-end process of the Dutch auction and artwork tokenisation using blockchain technology.

 

The buyers were a mix of sophisticated investors, crypto enthusiasts and fine art professionals. The participants were mostly from Europe and Asia. Marcelo García Casil, CEO of Maecenas, said “This is a historical moment, for us and for the blockchain community. We have achieved a significant milestone that marks the beginning of a new era. Tokenisation of assets is the most prominent and exciting use case of blockchain technology, and we’re proud to be pioneers in this space. This Warhol painting is the first of many more to come and we are looking forward to seeing and leading the financial revolution for the art market.”

 

Eleesa Dadiani, founder of Dadiani Syndicate, added “This auction was unchartered territory; a new model in an age-old market. The unprecedented demand, and speed with which the first fraction has been sold, has gone a long way to validating our vision of a more democratic and open art investment market.”

 

Maecenas tokenised 14 Small Electric Chairs by converting it into tamper-proof digital certificates or “fractions” based on the Ethereum network. Buyers then purchased fractions of 14 Small Electric Chairs with Bitcoin, Ether or the ART token, a cryptocurrency created for Maecenas. The auction was run entirely by a smart contract. The Maecenas blockchain gives buyers access to artworks that have been verified and are stored securely. Both the sale and subsequent trading of these certificates are tracked on a blockchain. Owners of the artwork fractions can sell their certificates to other buyers at any time via the Maecenas marketplace. The success of this auction makes a new progress from banks to cryptocurrencies that’ll lead a new way to invest in artwork, as Maecenas pursues its goal to democratise access to fine art.

 

14 Small Electric Chairs is part of Warhol’s 1980 Reversal series – a postmodern reworking of his iconic 1960s Death and Disaster Series. The artwork is certificated from the Andy Warhol Art Authentication Board in New York.

 

source: maecenas

Hidden in a Picasso Blue Period Painting

 

 

An international partnership of the Northwestern University/Art Institute of Chicago Center for Scientific Studies in the Arts (NU-ACCESS), the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO) and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, has used multiple modes of light to uncover details hidden beneath the visible surface of Pablo Picasso’s painting “La Miséreuse accroupie” (The Crouching Woman), a major work from the artist’s Blue Period. The 1902 oil painting, owned by the AGO in Toronto, Canada, depicts a crouching and cloaked woman, painted in white, blues, grays and greens.

 

With knowledge of an underlying landscape revealed long ago by X-ray radiography at the AGO, researchers used non-invasive portable imaging techniques, including infrared reflectance hyperspectral imaging adapted by the National Gallery of Art and then an X-ray fluorescence imaging instrument developed at Northwestern, to detail buried images connected to other works by Picasso — including a watercolor recently sold at auction — as well as the presence of a landscape likely by another Barcelona painter underneath “La Miséreuse accroupie.”

 

Picasso painted over another painter’s work after rotating it 90 degrees to the right, using some of the landscape forms in his own final composition of “La Miséreuse accroupie.” Picasso incorporated the lines of the cliff edges into the woman’s back, for example. Picasso also made a major compositional change, the researchers report. The artist initially painted the woman with a right arm and hand holding a disk but then covered them with her cloak in the final work.

 

By closely observing “La Miséreuse accroupie,” AGO had observed distinct textures and contrasting underlying color that peeked through the crack lines and did not match the visible composition. X-ray radiography was the first non-invasive tool used to uncover hidden information in “La Miséreuse accroupie;” it revealed a horizontal landscape by a different Barcelona painter, whose identity remains unknown, under the visible surface of Picasso’s painting.

 

For a more detailed understanding of the repositioned arm, NU-ACCESS scientists next investigated the painting using images generated by their X-ray fluorescence (XRF) scanner. The NU-ACCESS team traveled twice to the AGO in Canada with their portable tools for the study.

 

This system produces grayscale images showing the distribution of elements associated with various pigments of the painting. The scientists were able to analyze 70 percent of the painting in 24 hours. Together with micro-samples extracted from strategic locations, the XRF results, along with further images generated by Delaney from the hyperspectral reflectance, reveal the steps of creation taken by Picasso.

 

The iron- and chromium-based pigments of the surface layer correlated with the painting’s current structure and its palette of mostly blues (painted with the iron-based Prussian blue and with ultramarine, Picasso’s Blue Period blue of choice) and yellow-greens (painted with chromium-based yellows). The elemental maps of cadmium- and lead-based pigments, however, revealed the presence of the woman’s right arm and hand beneath the visible surface.

 

Questions raised by this research on Picasso’s influence and style during his Blue Period will be further explored in a Picasso Blue Period exhibition at the Art Gallery of Ontario and The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., in 2020 through 2021.

 

 

 

 

 

source: northwestern

Illuminating the Carolinas

 

 

Light sculptures of Butterflies, Deer, and Venus Fly Traps are illuminatomg Brookgreen’s Summer Lights Festival. Located south of Myrtle Beach, Brookgreen Gardens is the floral jewel of South Carolina’s coastal community. The 9,127-acre property preserves the natural and cultivated landscape of this historic site.

 

The lighting festival takes place within Brookgreen Gardens at their Lowcountry Zoo where guests have the opportunity to see native animals in areas maintained as close as possible to their natural habitats as possible. The festival closes August 19.

 

 

 

sources: brookgreen, aldahazel, southstrandnews

Magical Lights in Ghent

 

Every three years, the charming Belgium city of Ghent is set ablaze with lights during the Ghent Light Festival. The recent 2018 edition brought in nearly one million attendees to experience the works of light artists from across the globe. Over five days, the city’s nights became the backdrop for a surprising spectacle, ingenious installations, spectacular performances and beautiful events, all based on light. This dazzling festival wraps the entire city in brilliant hues of iridescent colors, including the city’s cathedral with more than 55,000 LEDs.

 

 

 

source: visit.gent.be

 

 

 

LIGHT UP LA – STUDIO EVENT APRIL 5, 2018

 

 

 

It was a beautiful sunny LA day as the West Coast design community visited us for our annual LIGHT UP LA Open House.

 

We always enjoy showing off our headquarters to new design partners and welcoming friends returning to see what’s new!

 

Our guests had a sneak preview of our new Spring ’18 Luxe Light & Home collections ahead of their official release at High Point Spring Market – the GRAMERCY midcentury starburst of brass or nickel and Brazilian Quartz crystal is already a hit! And the delightful ARABELLE was her fabulous sparkling self! See the Luxe site for all the options – and of course we can customize the designs to fit your project.

 

Talking of custom, our visitors also enjoyed tours of our 85,000 sqft factory and design offices  where we create our Lusive signature custom lighting for hospitality, contract and residential applications worldwide.

 

Our inhouse artisans conducted an interactive gold leafing workshop and then we all mingled together in our beautiful studios, sipping on signature Elusive Sidecar cocktails as the sun went down…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Forensic Architecture Assembling Evidence of the Grenfell Tower Fire

 

In June of 2017, the Grenfell Tower fire was unprecedented in London’s history, not least because the catastrophe was captured live by thousands of videos of the fire, taken by Londoners on their cameras and smartphones. Every one of those videos is a unique piece of evidence, containing unique information.

 

Forensic Architecture, an independent research agency based at Goldsmiths, University of London, has started to collect these pieces of evidence and assemble them within a 3D model of Grenfell Tower. Our aim is to create a powerful and freely-available resource for members of the public to explore and better understand the events of the night of the fire.

 

These pieces of footage will become a continuous ‘3D video’ of the fire, mapped onto our architectural model of Grenfell Tower. The model will allow the user to investigate the fire, and will sit within a web platform which will ultimately act as a freely available public resource.

 

In recent years Forensic Architecture has successfully tested its methodologies in a number of landmark legal and human rights cases undertaken together with and on behalf of threatened communities, NGOs, prosecutors and the UN.

 

sources: forensic-architecture, wikipedia

KRAVET Debuts New Los Angeles Showroom & Becomes A Lighting Destination!

 

KRAVET Debuts New Los Angeles Showroom & Becomes A Lighting Destination!

 

The cream of the design industry attended the opening of the beautiful new Kravet showroom at the Pacific Design Center.

 

Coinciding with their 100 Year celebrations, the new space debuts all that Kravet is known for – stunning fabrics, designer furniture collections, sophisticated carpets … and – as Luxe Light & Home continue to proudly partner with them to offer our lighting collections – yes, Kravet offers lighting!

 

Visit the PDC team to see the best of all products in their new, luxurious surroundings!

 

 

 

Tiny House Challenge Brings Big Ideas

Ryterna modul, a European modular container and building producer recently announced the winners of their fourth International competition: Architectural Challenge 2018 Tiny House. 150 entries from 88 countries had the task of designing a home for two people no larger than 25 square meters that integrated a kitchen, bathroom, living room, and sleeping area into a cohesive environment. Here are the three winning solutions and one honorable mention:

 

Abdolrahman Kadkhodasalehi took first prize with “Wave House,” a semi-circular structure that appears to dance on its minimal foundations. Large planes of glass, natural materials, and an integrated water harvesting system keep the home in constant dialogue with its surroundings.

 

 

Second place was awarded to “Torii House,” a modular proposal by Julia and Stas Kaptur. Consisting of a core module flanked by two additional programs wrapped in wood, Torri House can be endlessly customized with terraces, saunas, and additional spaces for larger families. The refined details and calculated modularity make this residence a suitable addition to sites from the suburbs to the ski slopes.

 

 

An expandable proposal by William Samin titled “Trapezoidal Mod” took third place in the competition. The proposal divides wet and dry functions into two separate modules that can be effortlessly re-configured to adapt to shifting terrain or potential expansion. The charred exterior and warm wood cladding within provide the perfect environment to frame natural landscapes from forests and plains to meadows and mountains.

 

 

Clarence Zichen Qian was given honorable mention for his design Project “ATN,” comprised of a titled structure populated with a grid-like millwork structure to define the interior space while providing calculated vistas into the world outside.

 

 

source: Ryterna modul

 

The Futurist Fashion of Iris van Herpen

 

Iris van Herpen is a Dutch fashion designer who is widely recognized as one of fashion’s most talented and forward-thinking creators who continuously pushes the boundaries of fashion design. Renowned for her use of 3-D printing, van Herpen is widely considered one of contemporary fashion’s most progressive creators, and is a favored designer of style icons, including Beyoncé, Lady Gaga, Björk, Cara Delevingne, and others. Phoenix Art Museum is the western-most destination on the North American tour of the exhibition “Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion” (February 24, 2018 through May 13, 2018) and the last chance to see these extraordinary collections of futuristic fashions in the USA.

 

Since her first collection in 2007, van Herpen has made a name for herself within and beyond the fashion world by combining tradition with radical innovation. Unparalleled in her multidisciplinary approach to creation, she has collaborated with artists, architects, and scientists such as Philip Beesley, Jólan van der Wiel, and Bart Hess, as well as teams at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 2011, TIME Magazine included her 3-D printed dresses on its list of 50 Best Inventions.

 

Featuring 45 ensembles created from 2008 – 2015, the minimalistic installation will also include a selection of her fantastical shoe designs and runway show footage. A featured work is the dress from her 2014 collection Biopiracy, on view for the first time since it was purchased by Arizona Costume Institute to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the fashion design collection and the Museum.

 

 

 

 

 

source: phxart

Andy Warhol’s First Selfies Sold

 

Andy Warhol’s first selfies recently were auctioned off by Sotheby’s. In the latter part of the twentieth-century, Andy Warhol joined the ranks of Rembrandt van Rijn, Vincent van Gogh, and Pablo Picasso to take his place amongst the most important and influential self-portraitists in the history of art. Throughout his career, he turned to his own visage to create works such as the present painting, filled with immediacy, vivacity, and sleek conceptual cool. Indeed, the present work is one of the first ten self-portraits that Warhol ever created and thus holds immense significance.

 

Warhol made Self-Portrait and the extant eight versions using images he had taken in a New York photo-booth. The use of such unconventional source material was, at this time, fiercely innovative, and added to the aura of technical invention that already surrounded this artist, who had pioneered the use of silkscreen printing in art only a couple of years previously. The lot sold for over 6 million British pounds.

 

source: Sotheby’s