Design

The Warp- A New Attraction And the Viewing Point As a Part of a Post-Earthquake Reconstruction in Yunnan

 

A little mountain town Ludian in a Chinese province Yunnan, was damaged by earthquakes in 2012 and 2014. As a part of post-earthquake reconstruction, architects and professors at the University of Hong Kong, John Lin and Olivier Ottervaere, with the help of first year architecture students have built the platform named Warp-  a 130 m long elevated viewing point which will also serve as a roadside market and the meeting point.

 

The hilly form of the wooden platform, very steep and curved, is designed to blend in and imitate the landscape, providing two mirrored areas in its shape, high and low, envisioned to be used for viewing and resting. Long steps along the structure’s base will entirely be used as a fruit market for selling local products as well as a meeting point for town’s residents, mostly composed out of Muslim population.

 

This project is the third and the last in a series of three wooden structures build in Yunnan province by two architects in a post-earthquake experimental project; The Pinch, The Sweep and The Warp.

 

 

 

source:domusweb

TreexOffice Changing the Perspective of the Workplace

 

A temporary pop-up coworking space build around a tree made for business people and creative workers in London’s Hoxton Square Park offers a new concept of working environment, one that is closer to nature.

 

TREExOFFICE is designed by Natalie Jeremijenko in collaboration with artists Shuster + Moseley, architects Tate Harmer and briefing architects Gensler from Londn’s Tate Harmer studio.

 

Made of compressed paper, see-through plastic and translucent polycarbonate it allows views to the park and the greenery. The roof is translucent, so the sunlight is pouring in and provides plenty of daylight for the working area instead of the fluorescent lighting. The exterior of TreeXOffice reflects the surrounding area and blends into the environment.

 

Eight workspaces in the TREExOFFICE are available for businesses, creative workers and community groups to hire for the next seven months. It is equipped with a power supply and WiFi and can host small meetings or intimate events.

 

“The innovative design of the TREExOFFICE will provide a space not only where people can work and meet, but also to interact with the natural environment,” said health, social care and culture councillor Jonathan McShane, describing it as “a vastly different experience from working in a modern office”.

 

 

sources: cbc.ca, urdesignmag, dezeen

Urbane Kultur Adds Boomerang-shaped Extension to Domed Tournesol Swimming Pool

 

French architecture studio Urbane Kultur has refurbished and extended their dome-shaped swimming pool just outside Strasbourg, which is one of nearly 200 built around France in the 1970s. The Tournesol swimming pool was built in 1975 in Lingolsheim, just outside Strasbourg, but suffered from poor insulation and a cramped layout, with changing rooms around its perimeter. To rectify this, Strasbourg studio Urbane Kultur was commissioned to refurbish the building and add an extension at the side for new changing rooms and offices, freeing up space inside for two new swimming pools.

 

During the 1970s and early 1980s, 183 of the dome-shaped swimming pools were built in France. The design, by architect Bernard Schoeller, is one of a number commissioned by the French government to encourage more people to swim, following the country’s poor performance in the sport in the 1968 Olympics. Schoeller named the buildings Tournesol – or sunflower in English – and built them with a self-supporting steel-framed dome that allows for a large column-free space inside. They also feature two curved sliding panels so that one side of the building can be opened up in summer, inspired by the way sunflowers angle themselves towards the sun.

 

Some of the pools have since been refurbished, a few have been heritage-protected, and more than 40 have been closed, irreparably damaged, or demolished. Save for the steel frame, the concrete foundations, and the original 25-meter pool, the entire dome was rebuilt in order to improve its insulation. The exterior was then clad in black rubber and the interior was covered in white stretched canvas.

 

At the sides, where changing rooms and the entrance used to be, two new pools have been added. One has a water jet and a tidal swimming zone, and the other provides a paddling pool for infants. A curved section of glazing was also added at the side, where the previous entrance was, offering a view of a new landscaped courtyard outside. Beside the dome, a boomerang-shaped extension has been added, with a discreet corridor linking the two buildings. It replaces a car park and two box-shaped buildings that housed an equipment room and a lifeguards’ room.

 

The extension provides 1,190 square meters of new space, doubling the size of the complex. It houses offices and rooms for technical equipment in one wing, and showers and changing rooms in the other wing, and was clad in steel panels to provide subtle reflections of the surroundings. Urbane Kultur is now working on the refurbishment of another Tournesol swimming pool in Ferette, 154 kilometers south of Strasbourg, near the Swiss border.

 

 

 

 

 

source: dezeen, photos by Jean Baptiste Dorner & Urbane Kulturun

Len Lye Centre- New Zealand’s “Temple of Art”

 

New Zealand got its first Museum of Contemporary Art, located in New Plymouth. The museum is adjacent to Govett-Brewster Art Gallery and it is entirely dedicated to a single artist, late filmmaker and a kinetic sculptor –  Len Lye.  The design of the building was the work of Patterson Architects Associates,  New Zealand’s most recognised architectural firm. Lye’s opus, dominated by the use of steel and light tied to a strong connection between art and architecture inspired the team of architects in creating this so-called “Temple of art”. The impressive curved walls of stainless steel reflect Lye’s use of metal and reflections in his kinetic sculptures but also underlines the industrial innovation and development of the surrounding area.  The contemporary interior combines beton floors and waving walls that intensify the futuristic form.

 

The museum exhibits Lye’s work in kinetic sculpture, film, painting, drawing, photography, batik, writing, etc. It also houses a cinema wich displays Len Lye’s film achievements, as well as international and experimental films and festival programming.

 

 

 

sources: contemporist.com arcitecturenow.co.nz suff.co.nz e-architect.co.uk

Tangle Sculptural Pendant Light Installation

 

Tangle is a sculptural pendant light installation consisting of three intertwining modules. The installation draws its influence from modern jewelry design, mobiles, and the crystalline molecular structures of natural stones. Brass and stone are intricately combined with integrated LED strips that accentuate different parts of the artifact. Tangle, designed by Flip Sellin and Claudia Pineda de Castro for COORDINATION-berlin, debuted at Berlin Design Selection during Milan Design Week.

 

 

 

 

 

source: designboom

Photothrope Shirt by Pauline van D

 

A Dutch designer, Pauline van Dongen specialized in women’s fashion combined with technology,  has developed a helpful piece of clothing for all the joggers on city roads and pathways. As a seasoned runner in urban Amsterdam,  van Dongen based this idea on her own needs and experience. She designed an illuminated garment using LEDs and foil to improve safety for night runners. The garment is made from technical jersey with washable strips of the low-energy lights installed inside and parts of reflective foil material that curve around the body. There is a little battery hidden in the pocket of the garment allowing lights to be be switched on/ off . Van Dongen is currently working on future versions with LEDs that respond to the runner’s movement or changes in surroundings. Also,  her aim is to create a LED powered shirt that anyone would choose to wear regardless of safety aspects.

 

 

source: dezeen

Gothenburg gets a public sauna above the waters of the city port

 

A Berlin-based architectural studio Raumlabor created a sauna that raises above the water of the port and can be reached by the wooden bridge in a Swedish town Gothenburg. The sauna is located in Frihamnen,  an industrial district of Gothenburg,   as a part of the redevolpment project for the area. Its industrial looking exterior hides a warm and welcoming timber-lined interior that includes a shower room with walls made of glass bottles. German architects worked closely with 24 locals to build this rusty structure and to incorporate it into the surrounding ambiance, with the aim to create a public sauna and a place of gathering.

 

“Frihamnen is gradually losing its industrial character and is steadily becoming a new, central part of Gothenburg, open to be discovered and adopted by the citizens,” said Francesco Apuzzo and Jan Liesegang, two of the 10 architects that comprise Raumlabor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Do you remember playing with the lite-brite as a kid? The classic toy by Hasbro enabled total artistic freedom using nothing more than a box with a light, a single sheet of black paper, and hundreds of miniature plastic choking-hazards. Chances are if those memories are somewhere in the depths of that nightmarish-land called childhood, there’s probably another. A blip or a passing phrase, maybe something like, ‘it would be so rad if this thing was absolutely massive’.

 
Well forty years later, the dream-granters at San Francisco’s hero design have made that wish come true. The ‘Everbright’ is a huge, highly-precise piece of legit-ness, 42 times as large as the original lite-brite. The design has been optimized, with all removable parts taken out of the equation. A simple turn of any of the boards 464 dials presents users with every color under the rainbow, including black and white thanks to LED technology. When done creating, a press of a button erases the canvas and resets dials to their default.

 

‘Everbright’ uses custom LED boards and a high-color contrast surface that looks great, regardless of time of day. Hero Design realized the piece with a focus on direct control by users, however, it is also capable of displaying customized animations and other interactive elements. Perfect for workspaces, events, dorm rooms, cars, bathrooms, laundromats, gyms, and lecture halls — it is the ultimate toy for creative teams and individuals alike. Hero Design is led by PhD Alan Rorie and Kelly Parkinson.

 

 

 

 

source: designboom

“TEAR OFF” WALLPAPER BY ZNAK

 

The “Tears Off” wallpaper is an innovative wallpaper with a modular design that gives your rooms a new do without having to go through the pain of getting rooms whitewashed or painted. Designed by Znak, the wallpaper allows everyone to take on the role of the designer as one can create their own space by tearing off a layer. The color and the texture underneath the wallpaper becomes a prominent part of the design.

 

The “Tear Off” is glued with a certain kind of adhesive directly onto your wall. From there, you can peel off sections to create your own custom designs and patterns. The wallpaper is produced out of non-woven material and the shapes that can be taken out are inspired by the transformation process of snakes.

The wallpaper, of course, comes in several different colors. The colors are mostly pastels and mellow colors which users prefer to put on their walls. Of course, the other option is to paint over the wallpaper itself to get ones desired color.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Oree designed a pen for a digital time

 

Oree, a French Technology retailer, launched a stylograph ballpoint pen that digitally records and stores handwritten notes  made on a particular paper. A high-speed micro-camera inside the pen records pen’s movements according to patterns on the paper; that later can be transferred to  Android or IOS via Bluetooth. The ballpoint comes with accompanying leather- covered notebook which contains patterned A5 paper designed to work in combination with the pen. A pen’s hand-shaped body is made from the ultramodern matt copper and has a triangular grip topped with a wood-tipped cap.

 

“The Stylograph pursues Orée’s design philosophy: elegant, simple and lasting functionality crafted with the finest natural materials. Our latest creation is made from pure copper and draws on the timeless purity and durability of this natural metal, the first ever used by mankind”, the company said.

 

 

source: dezeen.com