Design

Lighting Inspired by a Water Well

 

With the inspiration of a water well, Stefan Nosko of the Academy of Fine Arts and Design, created the unique, mood-setting ‘Well Light.’ It takes a simple oiled Maple wood with brass elements as the handle and attaches to that a woven textile cable. Attached to the cable is a bulb socket which is made from brass allowing the light to be easily lowered and lifted into the blown glass container.

 

When the rope is lowered into the glass, the light radiates a soothing darker glow due to the coloring of the glass container at the bottom – either matted or blue. When the bulb is raised, it radiates light more clearly, brightening the surroundings. The entire process of controlling the lightning, just like lowering and raising the water bucket into the well, is soothing in and of itself.

 

 

 

source: yankodesign

Circuit Marker – Drawing Magic

 

Japanese infrastructure company Kandenko, who is involved in many fields including electrical and telecommunication, has a fun video featuring an AgIC pen, which allows you to draw ink that instantly conducts electricity over paper. The circuit marker has silver-based conductive ink that dries and becomes conductive immediately on circuit paper – allowing you to draw your own circuit and turn LEDs or motors on. The charming artistic appeal of the pen is illustrated in all its magical glory in this short promotional video called, “Future with bright lights.”

 

 

source: agic.cc

 

NASA researches LEDs

 

NASA has researched the advantages of LED lighting systems within the spacecraft environment. The Solid-State Lighting Module (SSLM) is designed to replace a General Luminaire Assembly (GLA) unit on the International Space Station (ISS). Identical to the GLA in fit and form, the SSLM temporarily replaced a GLA on ISS. The crew was asked to complete a brief evaluation regarding the quality of the light output and the usefulness of the dimming feature. The SSLM measures 26.5″ x 6.6″ x 3.9″ and has a mass of approximately 7.5 pounds.

 

Three ground-based studies were completed on visual performance, color discrimination, and melatonin (melatonin promotes sleepiness) suppression in healthy human subjects under different SSLA light exposure conditions inside a high-fidelity replica of the ISS crew quarters (CQ). Color discrimination tests showed no significant differences in color discrimination for indirect daylight, fluorescent room light, and SSLA light in the CQ. Also, there were no significant differences in score or time for subjects performing contrast tests. Presently, the data demonstrate that bright white Solid-State Lighting Module-Research (SSLM-R) light supports visual performance and color discrimination equivalently to typical indoor exposures to indirect daylight and overhead fluorescent light. In addition, increasing exposures to SSLA inside the CQ elicit increasingly stronger melatonin suppressions in healthy volunteers. The findings demonstrate the feasibility of doing controlled studies on visual, neuroendocrine and circadian responses in a high fidelity replica of an ISS component.

 

Early studies represent a start towards quantifying the broader range of visual, biological and behavioral responses to light once the current fluorescent lighting system is replaced by solid-state lighting. The data reported here begin to address long-duration space exploration, and the rapid development of solid-state lighting that will ultimately revolutionize how our public facilities, work places and homes are illuminated in the coming decades. Similar to some of the astronauts, a significant portion of the global population suffers from chronic sleep loss or circadian-related disorders. By refining multipurpose lights for astronaut safety, health and well-being in spaceflight, the door is opened for new lighting strategies that can be evolved for use on Earth.

 

 

source: NASA

USC students design tiny homes for homeless women in Los Angeles

 

USC architecture students have designed a creative solution to temporarily shelter homeless women: tiny pods built of birch, steel, and aluminum that can be stacked and rearranged on parking lots or vacant plots of land. These mini cabins are expected to be cheaper and lighter, simpler to replicate, and easier to put up and take down than similar cargo containers, which have also been used for homeless housing.

 

The students collaborated with Mission Hills-based nonprofit Hope of the Valley Rescue Mission, which is fundraising to finish the working architectural and engineering plans. It’s estimated one pod will cost about $25,000 to make. Craft envisions a complex of 30 residential units, plus shared bathroom pods and a handful that will be connected for communal living spaces. The nonprofit recently applied for $1.8 million in Measure HHH funding.

 

 

source: la.curbed

British Airways’ Happiness Blanket

 

British Airways recently experimented with a “happiness blanket” – a high-tech comforter that measured and illuminated a passenger’s mood in red and blue via woven fiber optics. Although the blankets didn’t become a lasting feature for the airline, they collected unique data on how flyers responded to various flight stages, and how their services could be enhanced.

 

source: British Airways

Beijing is Getting the World’s Tallest Atrium

 

Currently under construction in Beijing is a 46 story tower , the Leeza Soho.  The structure is within the Lize Financial District and will be well connected to the city with its location above a subway interchange station.  Zaha Hadid Architects write: “As the tower rises, the diagonal axis through the site defined by the subway tunnel is re-aligned by ‘twisting’ the atrium through 45 degrees to orientate the atrium’s higher floors with the east-west axis of Lize Road, one of west Beijing’s primary avenues.”

 

The twist in the atrium allows natural light to penetrate into the center of all the floors and allows for a diversity of views into the city from all directions. The tower is on track for completion in 2018.

 

 

 

source: inhabitat

The ‘Flying House’

 

With a love of aviation, a pilot in South Korea felt the sky was the limit for his vision of the perfect home. He commissioned architect HyoMan Kim of IROJE KHM to bring his ‘Flying House’ idea to life.

 

The house, near the Incheon Airport in South Korea, is not completely futuristic. It has its roots in a traditional Korean house to provide a feeling of being grounded. In contrast , the floating roof looks ready to take flight. The house features an extended area of lawn that slopes up one side of the house to a rooftop landscape which allows the occupants to stroll through the different levels outside the house. This allows the home to coexist with the nature and form a landscape hill providing a balance between the land and the sky.

 

Key features on the interior include a contemporary version of a conversation pit – a large seating area with a heated stone floor. To help reduce construction costs, structural materials, including the concrete framework and block walls, were left exposed on the interior.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sources: Stuff, Sergio Pirrone (photos)

Artists of Light in Chandannagar

 

 

Once a French colony, Chandannagar now is a thriving French language and cultural hub in eastern India. The town is known for it’s celebration of Jagadhatri Puja, ‘the Protector of the World’ who is an aspect of the Hindu goddess Durga, particularly worshipped in the West Bengal region of India. Jagaddhatri is depicted as being the colour of the morning sun, three-eyed and four-armed, holding a chakra, conch, bow and arrows, clothed in red, bright jewels and nagajangopaveeta (a serpent as the sacred thread), a symbol of yoga and the Brahman. She rides a lion standing on the dead Karindrasura, the Elephant Demon.

 

The beginning of this five-day festival in Chandannagar is still unchronicled but it is generally believed to have been introduced in the late 18th century by a local zamindar. When electricity came to Chandannagar experiments with lights began. The creative lighting was originally meant for decorating the festival’s venues, but has taken on a life of its own.

 

At the forefront of the innovative displays are artists like Kashinath Neogy. In 2005, Neogy took a tough decision to introduce LED lights, much to the criticism of his colleagues, to cut down on high power consumption. They preferred the age-old practice of using tiny bulbs that made up a single unit wrapped in colored paper by hand. He created a giant dragon with 180000 LED lights, 30 feet long and 12 feet high. Today, usage of LEDs is a standard practice for lighting artists at the festival.

 

 

source: tribuneindia, wikipedia

Texting Colors Warm Up Boston’s Winter

 

“Color Commons,” created by New American Public Art, is a series of 24-foot “light blades” lining Boston’s Wharf District parks. When someone sends a text, the server sends the message to the microcontroller. Whether it’s a color or the ciphered message, the microcontroller translates the text to a trigger code which changes the colors of the Light Blades.

 

By activating Color Commons, New American Public Art and The Rose Kennedy Greenway Conservancy hope to make Boston a more playable city, one where existing urban infrastructure can be reused in ways that enhance person-to-city and person-to-person connections. In 2016, The Greenway made a commitment to playability through their hire of a full-time Play Coordinator. Both groups hope to continue their collaborations to put Boston on the map of cities across the globe that have joined the movement to make their urban spaces more playable. Color Commons will be on display through Winter 2017.

 

 

 

source: newamericanpublicart

Santiago Calatrava’s Turning Torso Wins CTBUH’s Award – 10 Years After Completion

 

Rotating a full 90 degrees along nine pentagonal sections, Santiago Calatrava’s “Turning Torso” was deemed the world’s first twisting skyscraper upon its completion in 2005. Still Scandinavia’s tallest tower, the 190-meter Malmö skyscraper has recently been awarded a 10 Year Award by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) for its continued value to the surrounding area and successful performance across a number of categories, including environmental, engineering performance, vertical transport, iconography, and others.

 

The CTBUH Awards are an independent review of building projects, judged by a panel of industry experts. Projects are recognized for making an extraordinary contribution to the advancement of tall buildings and the urban environment, and for achieving sustainability at the broadest level.

 

Turning Torso was featured in the CTBUH Best Tall Buildings Book, as well as celebrated at the CTBUH Annual Awards Symposium, which took place at the Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago.

 

source: CTBUH