Design

The Printing of Shape-Shifting Objects

 

A team of researchers from Georgia Institute of Technology and two other institutions has developed a new 3-D printing method to create objects that can permanently transform into a range of different shapes in response to heat. The team, which included researchers from the Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) and Xi’an Jiaotong University in China, created the objects by printing layers of shape memory polymers with each layer designed to respond differently when exposed to heat.

 

Their development of the new 3-D printed objects follows earlier work the team had done using smart shape memory polymers (SMPs), which have the ability to remember one shape and change to another programmed shape when uniform heat is applied, to make objects that could fold themselves along hinges.

 

To demonstrate the capabilities of the new process, the team fabricated several objects that could bend or expand quickly when immersed in hot water – including a model of a flower whose petals bend like a real daisy responding to sunlight and a lattice-shaped object that could expand by nearly eight times its original size.

 

The new 4-D objects could enable a range of new product features, such as allowing products that could be stacked flat or rolled for shipping and then expanded once in use, the researchers said. Eventually, the technology could enable components that could respond to stimuli such as temperature, moisture or light in a way that is precisely timed to create space structures, deployable medical devices, robots, toys and range of other structures.

 

 

source: Georgia Tech

Lego Goes Green

 

 

Production has started on a range of sustainable LEGO elements made from plant-based plastic sourced from sugarcane. The new sustainable LEGO ‘botanical’ elements will come in varieties including leaves, bushes and trees. The move is part of the LEGO Group’s commitment to use sustainable materials in core products and packaging by 2030.

 

The new sustainable LEGO elements are made from polyethylene, which is a soft, durable and flexible plastic, and while they are based on sugar-cane material, they are technically identical to those produced using conventional plastic. The elements have been tested to ensure the plant-based plastic meets the high standards for quality and safety that the LEGO Group has.

 

“LEGO products have always been about providing high quality play experiences giving every child the chance to shape their own world through inventive play. Children and parents will not notice any difference in the quality or appearance of the new elements, because plant-based polyethylene has the same properties as conventional polyethylene,” said Tim Brooks.

 

source: lego

Ron Arad: Out of the Box

 

Ron Arad’s constant experimentation with the possibilities of materials such as steel, aluminum or polyamide and his radical re-conception of the form and structure of furniture has put him at the forefront of contemporary design and architecture.

 

Born in Tel Aviv in 1951, educated at the Jerusalem Academy of Art and later at the Architectural Association in London, Ron Arad co-founded with Caroline Thorman the design and production studio One Off in 1981 and later, in 1989, Ron Arad Associates architecture and design practice. In 2008 Ron Arad Architects was established alongside Ron Arad Associates. From 1994 to 1999 he established the Ron Arad Studio, design and production unit in Como, Italy. He was Professor of Design Product at the Royal College of Art in London up until 2009. Ron Arad was awarded the 2011 London Design Week Medal for design excellence and was became a Royal Academician of the Royal Academy of Arts in 2013.

 

Arad’s career as a designer began with the Rover chair, a leather car seat of a Rover V8 2L anchored on a tubular steel frame. Alongside his limited edition studio work, Arad designs for many leading international companies including Kartell, Vitra, Moroso, Fiam, Driade, Alessi, Cappellini, Cassina, WMF and Magis among many others. He has designed a number of Public Art pieces, most recently the Vortext in Seoul, Korea, and the Kesher Sculpture at Tel Aviv University.

 

Arad designed the ToHA office complex in Tel Aviv, under construction until 2018. Once completed, it will be the tallest skyscraper in Israel.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sources: ronarad, wikipedia

 

LIGHT UP LA – STUDIO EVENT APRIL 5, 2018

 

 

 

It was a beautiful sunny LA day as the West Coast design community visited us for our annual LIGHT UP LA Open House.

 

We always enjoy showing off our headquarters to new design partners and welcoming friends returning to see what’s new!

 

Our guests had a sneak preview of our new Spring ’18 Luxe Light & Home collections ahead of their official release at High Point Spring Market – the GRAMERCY midcentury starburst of brass or nickel and Brazilian Quartz crystal is already a hit! And the delightful ARABELLE was her fabulous sparkling self! See the Luxe site for all the options – and of course we can customize the designs to fit your project.

 

Talking of custom, our visitors also enjoyed tours of our 85,000 sqft factory and design offices  where we create our Lusive signature custom lighting for hospitality, contract and residential applications worldwide.

 

Our inhouse artisans conducted an interactive gold leafing workshop and then we all mingled together in our beautiful studios, sipping on signature Elusive Sidecar cocktails as the sun went down…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stanford Researchers are Seeing Around Corners

 

A driverless car is making its way through a winding neighborhood street, about to make a sharp turn onto a road where a child’s ball has just rolled. Although no person in the car can see that ball, the car stops to avoid it. This is because the car is outfitted with extremely sensitive laser technology that reflects off nearby objects to see around corners. This scenario is one of many that researchers at Stanford University are imagining for a system that can produce images of objects hidden from view. They are focused on applications for autonomous vehicles, some of which already have similar laser-based systems for detecting objects around the car, but other uses could include seeing through foliage from aerial vehicles or giving rescue teams the ability to find people blocked from view by walls and rubble.

 

For their system, the researchers set a laser next to a highly sensitive photon detector, which can record even a single particle of light. They shoot pulses of laser light at a wall and, invisible to the human eye, those pulses bounce off objects around the corner and bounce back to the wall and to the detector. Currently, this scan can take from two minutes to an hour, depending on conditions such as lighting and the reflectivity of the hidden object.

 

Once the scan is finished, the algorithm untangles the paths of the captured photons and, like the mythical image enhancement technology of television crime shows, the blurry blob takes much sharper form. It does all this in less than a second and is so efficient it can run on a regular laptop. Based on how well the algorithm currently works, the researchers think they could speed it up so that it is nearly instantaneous once the scan is complete.

 

The team is continuing to work on this system, so it can better handle the variability of the real world and complete the scan more quickly. For example, the distance to the object and amount of ambient light can make it difficult for their technology to see the light particles it needs to resolve out-of-sight objects. This technique also depends on analyzing scattered light particles that are intentionally ignored by guidance systems currently in cars – known as LIDAR systems.

 

Before this system is road ready, it will also have to work better in daylight and with objects in motion, like a bouncing ball or running child. The researchers did test their technique successfully outside but they worked only with indirect light. Their technology did perform particularly well picking out retroreflective objects, such as safety apparel or traffic signs. The researchers say that if the technology were placed on a car today, that car could easily detect things like road signs, safety vests or road markers, although it might struggle with a person wearing non-reflective clothing.

 

source: stanford

Floating Housing Complex on the Hudson?

 

Pier 40, a decaying 15-acre structure on the Hudson River, is being re-imagined by DFA, a New York architecture firm. New York City’s sea level is expected to rise 11-30 inches by 2050 and between 50 to 75 inches by 2100, with the majority of current buildings not designed to accommodate such inevitable changes. DFA’s vision for Pier 40 takes a longer-term view with comprehensive design approach for the future.

 

Following an analysis of the zoning and state of existing piles, DFA identified areas that are fit for supporting clusters of program influenced by the Pier’s predominant recreational use and addressing a city-wide need for affordable housing. Combining the analysis with design, DFA utilized an algorithm to determine the optimal location for each tower type, determining that each tower must have at least three structurally sound connection points to support the weight/load. From this four tower typologies ranging between 96- to 455-feet tall emerge as viable options for spreading 450-units and a variety of housing density across the site.

 

 

 

 

source: d-f-a

Tiny House Challenge Brings Big Ideas

Ryterna modul, a European modular container and building producer recently announced the winners of their fourth International competition: Architectural Challenge 2018 Tiny House. 150 entries from 88 countries had the task of designing a home for two people no larger than 25 square meters that integrated a kitchen, bathroom, living room, and sleeping area into a cohesive environment. Here are the three winning solutions and one honorable mention:

 

Abdolrahman Kadkhodasalehi took first prize with “Wave House,” a semi-circular structure that appears to dance on its minimal foundations. Large planes of glass, natural materials, and an integrated water harvesting system keep the home in constant dialogue with its surroundings.

 

 

Second place was awarded to “Torii House,” a modular proposal by Julia and Stas Kaptur. Consisting of a core module flanked by two additional programs wrapped in wood, Torri House can be endlessly customized with terraces, saunas, and additional spaces for larger families. The refined details and calculated modularity make this residence a suitable addition to sites from the suburbs to the ski slopes.

 

 

An expandable proposal by William Samin titled “Trapezoidal Mod” took third place in the competition. The proposal divides wet and dry functions into two separate modules that can be effortlessly re-configured to adapt to shifting terrain or potential expansion. The charred exterior and warm wood cladding within provide the perfect environment to frame natural landscapes from forests and plains to meadows and mountains.

 

 

Clarence Zichen Qian was given honorable mention for his design Project “ATN,” comprised of a titled structure populated with a grid-like millwork structure to define the interior space while providing calculated vistas into the world outside.

 

 

source: Ryterna modul

 

“World’s Largest Picture Frame” Opens in Dubai

 

Dubai’s new monument soars almost 500 ft. tall and is the “world’s largest picture frame.” The structure represents the aspirations and achievements of the city. A decade in the making … in 2008, an international contest was organized by German elevator company Thyssen Krupp in collaboration with the International Union of Architects (UIA), which has UNESCO backing. Mexican architect Fernando Donis submitted a structure that would “embrace a void” and frame other monuments. His unique idea beat out 900 entries.

 

The glittering structure lights up at night as visitors stroll across the 305 ft. glass bottom walkway. From there, they have a sweeping panorama of the city, including a view of the iconic Burj Khalifa.

 

 

 

source: mymodernmet

 

Voice Activated Toilet with Mood Lighting

 

In the old wild West, cowboys would have never dreamed that many years later there would be such a remarkable way to replace the outhouse. But at the recent CES show in Las Vegas, Kohler introduced that there’s a new toilet in town. Their new “Numi” toilet (running at over six thousand dollars) can warm your bottom, set mood lighting, flush and close its lid without being touched.

 

A specially designed app for iOS and Android enables both voice commands and hands-free motion control. It has a motion-activated lid and seat, a retracting bidet and air dryer, a built-in air deodorizer, a heated seat, and floor-level vents. Additionally, a touchscreen remote gives a slew of customizable options – all saved separately for each user of the household including a built-in music system and ambient lighting. An app for iOS and Android enables both voice commands and hands-free motion control.

 

source: kohler

Europe’s First Underwater Restaurant

 

 

At the southernmost point of the Norwegian coastline by the village of Båly, the award-winning architect firm, Snøhetta, has designed Europe’s very first underwater restaurant . . . appropriately named Under. With its immediate proximity with the forces of nature, the restaurant, which will also function as a research center for marine life, is a tribute to the Norwegian coast and to Lindesnes – to the wild fauna of the sea and to the rocky coastline of Norway’s southern tip.

 

Under’s namesake holds a double meaning: In Norwegian, “under” can just as well be translated into “wonder.” Half-sunken into the sea, the building’s monolithic form breaks the water surface to lie against the craggy shoreline. More than an aquarium, the structure will become a part of its marine environment, coming to rest directly on the sea bed five meters below the water’s surface. With meter-thick concrete walls, the structure is built to withstand pressure and shock from the rugged sea conditions. Like a sunken periscope, the restaurant’s massive acrylic windows offer a view of the seabed as it changes throughout the seasons and varying weather conditions.

 

As visitors begin their journey through the restaurant they descend through three levels. From the entrance, where the tidepool is swallowed by the sea, guests enter the wardrobe area. Visitors are then ushered down one level to the champagne bar, which marks the transition between the shoreline and the ocean. This physical transformation is emphasized by a narrow acrylic window cutting vertically down through the restaurant levels. From the bar, guests can also look down at the seabed level of the restaurant, where two long dining tables and several smaller tables are placed in front of the large panoramic window.

 

Through its architecture, menu and mission of informing the public about the biodiversity of the sea, Under will provide an under-water experience inspiring a sense of awe and delight, activating all the senses – both physical and intellectual. The restaurant will be opened to the public in 2019.

 

 

 

 

source: snohetta