LUXE STUDIO

Anon Pairot Promotes Sustainability by Turning Cassava Waste into Penta Lamp


Cassava is one of the crops that is being cultivated the most in Thailand and during certain times of the year, farmers face an excessive supply of it, causing a huge amount of waste and pollution. Wanting to find a solution to this problem and a use for all this wasted material, designer Anon Pairot created ‘Penta’, a pendant lamp that carries an esthetic value and is environmentally friendly.

 

‘Penta’s has a Pentagon shape (hence the name) that not only creates a strong structure, but reflects the shape of a cassava leaf as well. More strength is added by processing the material with a hi-pressure vacuum, where its fiber becomes solid and rigid, possessing a very interesting translucent effect while having little weight. The ‘penta’ production process generates zero waste and every defective part can be reprocessed and blended into a new lamp.

 

The best part of the cassava material is that it can be 100% recyclable and no chemical wastes are left behind. Furthermore, in suitable conditions, the material can be naturally decomposed within 2-3 weeks. With a product like the ‘penta’ lamp, Anon Pairot provides customers with sustainable lifestyle products.

 

 

source: designboom

Kobe Luminarie – Festival of Lights

 

For two weeks in December Kobe, Japan becomes a winter wonderland of lights.
Known as the Kobe Luminarie, the light show is a memorial to the Great Hanshin earthquake of 1995. The first show that year, under the banner ‘Dreams and Light’, was held as a message of hope to celebrate the city’s remarkable recovery.

 
Now an annual event, over 200,000 individually hand painted lights, donated by the Italian Government, are lit each year in the city’s Old Foreign Settlement, Produced by designers Valerio Festi and Hirokazu Imaoka each year has a new theme and attracts 5 million visitors.

 

 

 

 

source: mymodernnet

The Chicago Horizon Pavilion by Studio Ultramoderne Opens on The Shores of Lake Michigan

 

The pavilion named Horizon, designed by architecture studio Ultramoderne, won the Chicago Lakefront Kiosk Competition as a part of inaugural Chicago Architecture Biennale. The structure is designed by Aaron Forrest and Yasmin Vobis in collaboration with structural engineer Brett Schneider. It is located in Millennium Park on Chicago’s waterfront, and it is made of the largest possible square timber ( 56 foot by 56 foot) that can be transported in one piece.

The pavillion, built by using cross-laminated timber (CLT), which is a durable engineered wood made of layers and layers of lumber glued together at right angles, is dominated by a 17m large roof structure supported by only 12 slender columns. The inspiration for the pavilion came from several buildings made by Modernist architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and his experiments with flatness, like in the S R Crown Hall located at the nearby Illinois Institute of Technology. The Chicago Horizon offers amazing views from the elevated viewing platform;. towards Lake Michigan and Chicago’s skyline of skyscrapers.

 

 

 

 

source: dezeen

LAb[au]’s m0za1que – a Kinetic Light Art Installation

 
A permanent kinetic light art installation, ‘m0za1que’ is featured on the main wall of the entrance hall at Maison Mecatronique, Annecy-le-Vieux, France. Produced by Belgium-based agency LAb[au] the piece relates motion with color through the phenomena of light. The 3.4m x 6m wall is divided into 26 ×15 squares, where each of the 390 tiles is motorized by a linear actuator with a 10cm range. The individually controlled motion system creates three-dimensional reliefs of geometric patterns, which evolve following the logic of cellular automata. During the day the programmed motifs draw black shadows, while in the evening colored shadows appear. three light-projectors in primary colors of red, green, and blue create a uniform white illumination on the wall – the shadows in the tiles appear in the secondary colors of light. The colored illuminated surfaces appear and disappear according to the facade’s movement.

 

 

 

 

source: designboom, images: LAb[au]

A new artificial skylight system

 

A team of  scientists at Insubria University in Como, Italy have developed an artificial skylight system  to  imitate daylight. Imagine – the ability to create a ‘sunny sky’ in any environment.
The inventors are presenting the possibility of ‘sunlight’ in underground spaces, museums, hospitals, stores, offices – impacting all types of windowless spaces to create the impression of ‘infinite space’ and to better visual and psychological conditions.
CoeLux has the potential to affect SAD – Seasonal Affective Disorder – a form of depression common in North Europe during the long winter nights, offering an alternative to phototherapy (using single lamps to light dark spaces). Three different settings mimic sunlight of different geographical lighting scenes – Nordic environments, the Mediterranean and the Tropics.

 

source: dailymail

 

Virtual Reality Changes the Face of Architecture

 

Virtual reality will soon become almost indistinguishable from the real world. Based in Shoreditch, East London, Inition specializes in using new technologies such as virtual reality to create a range of experiences and installation, and noted that virtual reality has finally got to the point where the experience matches people’s expectations.

 

The studio has been working with the developer version of Oculus Rift, a virtual reality headset that was announced on the crowd-funding website Kickstarter in 2012.

 

The Oculus Rift was sort of the poster child for virtual reality. It is a seven-inch mobile phone-type screen and two lenses. It’s that simple.

 

The developer version of Oculus Rift has a very low-resolution screen, but with the pixel density of mobile phone screens rapidly increasing, it won’t be long before virtual reality becomes as life-like as the real world.

 

“We’re going to see this year a headset where it’s starting to get quite difficult to distinguish whether you’re actually wearing a headset or not,” claims the developers of the Oculus. “When we start to get super-high-resolution headsets with the type of display technology that we’re seeing on the market now, it’s going to blur the line between what is reality and what is virtual.”

 

 

source: dezeen

The Warp- A New Attraction And the Viewing Point As a Part of a Post-Earthquake Reconstruction in Yunnan

 

A little mountain town Ludian in a Chinese province Yunnan, was damaged by earthquakes in 2012 and 2014. As a part of post-earthquake reconstruction, architects and professors at the University of Hong Kong, John Lin and Olivier Ottervaere, with the help of first year architecture students have built the platform named Warp-  a 130 m long elevated viewing point which will also serve as a roadside market and the meeting point.

 

The hilly form of the wooden platform, very steep and curved, is designed to blend in and imitate the landscape, providing two mirrored areas in its shape, high and low, envisioned to be used for viewing and resting. Long steps along the structure’s base will entirely be used as a fruit market for selling local products as well as a meeting point for town’s residents, mostly composed out of Muslim population.

 

This project is the third and the last in a series of three wooden structures build in Yunnan province by two architects in a post-earthquake experimental project; The Pinch, The Sweep and The Warp.

 

 

 

source:domusweb

Tangent’s Kihou Lighting Uses Liquid & Air Bubbles to Create Sublime Ambiance

 

Tangent Design is known for developing unconventional illumination systems, creating environments that result in sublime ambiances as evidenced in ‘Kihou’. The indirect lighting product uses two kinds of liquid and air bubbles to realize an effervescent effect of pulsating golden bulbs. A sticky medium fills a ceramic bowl, topped by a thin layer of black silicone oil outfitted by LEDs embedded at the bottom of the vessel. A small pump then pushes air upwards, making luminous bubbles rise from the dark surface. the combination of the viscous liquid, the lightness of the oil, the rhythm of the bubbles and the unexpected noise, results in a mysterious contrast between the golden light and black surface. ‘Kihou’ was part of the ’10/10′ exhibition curated by François Bernard at MODA International during Maison et Objet in Paris.

 

 

source: designboom

TreexOffice Changing the Perspective of the Workplace

 

A temporary pop-up coworking space build around a tree made for business people and creative workers in London’s Hoxton Square Park offers a new concept of working environment, one that is closer to nature.

 

TREExOFFICE is designed by Natalie Jeremijenko in collaboration with artists Shuster + Moseley, architects Tate Harmer and briefing architects Gensler from Londn’s Tate Harmer studio.

 

Made of compressed paper, see-through plastic and translucent polycarbonate it allows views to the park and the greenery. The roof is translucent, so the sunlight is pouring in and provides plenty of daylight for the working area instead of the fluorescent lighting. The exterior of TreeXOffice reflects the surrounding area and blends into the environment.

 

Eight workspaces in the TREExOFFICE are available for businesses, creative workers and community groups to hire for the next seven months. It is equipped with a power supply and WiFi and can host small meetings or intimate events.

 

“The innovative design of the TREExOFFICE will provide a space not only where people can work and meet, but also to interact with the natural environment,” said health, social care and culture councillor Jonathan McShane, describing it as “a vastly different experience from working in a modern office”.

 

 

sources: cbc.ca, urdesignmag, dezeen

Diwali festival of lights

 

Diwali, festival of lights, is an ancient Hindu festival that takes place each year between mid-October and mid-November. Deepawali or Diwali is the largest, and the brightest of all Hindu festivals officially celebrated in Fiji, Guyana, India, Malaysia, Mauritius, Nepal, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Suriname and Trinidad and Tobago. The festival is marked for five days of celebration, whereas each day is distinguished by a different tradition.

 

Before the Diwali night people clean, renovate and decorate their houses with diyas, lamps and candles and create design patterns called rangoli on the floor using colored powders or sand. On the third night of Diwali, families gather in Lakshmi Puja, a traditional family prays to Lakshmi, a Hindu goddess of wealth and prosperity. The Lakshmi Puja is followed by mouth-watering feasts and fireworks.

 

The fourth day of Diwali, Padva is dedicated to wife–husband relationship, while Bhau-Beej, the last day festival is dedicated to sister–brother bond when brothers visit their married sisters who welcome them with love and a lavish meal.

 

 

 

source: national geographic