LUXE STUDIO

Every Refrigerator Tells a Story

 

Crowded with notes, photos, memories, souvenirs and magnets; every refrigerator tells a story. The latest exhibition at Center for Architecture Sarasota (CFAS), Human Tales on Refrigerator Doors, Sweet Sparkman Architects and the master students of UF CityLab-Sarasota finally give the refrigerator door the spotlight it deserves.

 

Featuring seven vintage doors in the show, the architects and students celebrated not only the natural geography of Florida, but the architectural history and traditions singular to the area and placed aspiring architectural students into the built environment to work with seasoned professionals.

 

 

sources: CFAS, srqmagazine, sarasotamagazine

Dramatic Projection Display at Chicago’s Merchandise Mart

 

The Merchandise Mart, one of Chicago’s most important landmarks, will soon become a magnificent visual display that lights up a major portion of the downtown area.

 

In 2018, a massive projection screen will display images and videos across the entire expanse of the Mart’s riverfront side. The idea was first proposed in 2014 by Mayor Emanuel’s team and the tourism bureau of Chicago.

 

Construction on the Merchandise Mart was completed in 1930, and it was once the largest building in the world at the time it was erected. Known for its iconic art deco style, the Mart houses floors and floors of space for art galleries, special exhibitions, and vendors.

 

This plan is one of many in the downtown area to increase tourism with creative urban planning, recreational space, and public art. The unique display might liken Chicago to cities like Paris or Las Vegas that are known for their massive displays. The privately-funded project at the Merchandise Mart might be the first of a handful of buildings in the city that might be used for visual projections.

 

source: urbanmatter

Beijing is Getting the World’s Tallest Atrium

 

Currently under construction in Beijing is a 46 story tower , the Leeza Soho.  The structure is within the Lize Financial District and will be well connected to the city with its location above a subway interchange station.  Zaha Hadid Architects write: “As the tower rises, the diagonal axis through the site defined by the subway tunnel is re-aligned by ‘twisting’ the atrium through 45 degrees to orientate the atrium’s higher floors with the east-west axis of Lize Road, one of west Beijing’s primary avenues.”

 

The twist in the atrium allows natural light to penetrate into the center of all the floors and allows for a diversity of views into the city from all directions. The tower is on track for completion in 2018.

 

 

 

source: inhabitat

The ‘Flying House’

 

With a love of aviation, a pilot in South Korea felt the sky was the limit for his vision of the perfect home. He commissioned architect HyoMan Kim of IROJE KHM to bring his ‘Flying House’ idea to life.

 

The house, near the Incheon Airport in South Korea, is not completely futuristic. It has its roots in a traditional Korean house to provide a feeling of being grounded. In contrast , the floating roof looks ready to take flight. The house features an extended area of lawn that slopes up one side of the house to a rooftop landscape which allows the occupants to stroll through the different levels outside the house. This allows the home to coexist with the nature and form a landscape hill providing a balance between the land and the sky.

 

Key features on the interior include a contemporary version of a conversation pit – a large seating area with a heated stone floor. To help reduce construction costs, structural materials, including the concrete framework and block walls, were left exposed on the interior.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

sources: Stuff, Sergio Pirrone (photos)

Artists of Light in Chandannagar

 

 

Once a French colony, Chandannagar now is a thriving French language and cultural hub in eastern India. The town is known for it’s celebration of Jagadhatri Puja, ‘the Protector of the World’ who is an aspect of the Hindu goddess Durga, particularly worshipped in the West Bengal region of India. Jagaddhatri is depicted as being the colour of the morning sun, three-eyed and four-armed, holding a chakra, conch, bow and arrows, clothed in red, bright jewels and nagajangopaveeta (a serpent as the sacred thread), a symbol of yoga and the Brahman. She rides a lion standing on the dead Karindrasura, the Elephant Demon.

 

The beginning of this five-day festival in Chandannagar is still unchronicled but it is generally believed to have been introduced in the late 18th century by a local zamindar. When electricity came to Chandannagar experiments with lights began. The creative lighting was originally meant for decorating the festival’s venues, but has taken on a life of its own.

 

At the forefront of the innovative displays are artists like Kashinath Neogy. In 2005, Neogy took a tough decision to introduce LED lights, much to the criticism of his colleagues, to cut down on high power consumption. They preferred the age-old practice of using tiny bulbs that made up a single unit wrapped in colored paper by hand. He created a giant dragon with 180000 LED lights, 30 feet long and 12 feet high. Today, usage of LEDs is a standard practice for lighting artists at the festival.

 

 

source: tribuneindia, wikipedia

Texting Colors Warm Up Boston’s Winter

 

“Color Commons,” created by New American Public Art, is a series of 24-foot “light blades” lining Boston’s Wharf District parks. When someone sends a text, the server sends the message to the microcontroller. Whether it’s a color or the ciphered message, the microcontroller translates the text to a trigger code which changes the colors of the Light Blades.

 

By activating Color Commons, New American Public Art and The Rose Kennedy Greenway Conservancy hope to make Boston a more playable city, one where existing urban infrastructure can be reused in ways that enhance person-to-city and person-to-person connections. In 2016, The Greenway made a commitment to playability through their hire of a full-time Play Coordinator. Both groups hope to continue their collaborations to put Boston on the map of cities across the globe that have joined the movement to make their urban spaces more playable. Color Commons will be on display through Winter 2017.

 

 

 

source: newamericanpublicart

DPA Lighting – Illuminated Beauty for Mike Stoane Lighting Event

 

 

German designers Tommaso Gimigliano and Ingo Kalecinski of dpalighting won kudos for their entry in Mike Stoane’s Lighting ‘Park Event’. The annual London based event challenges design teams to use a box of mystery components – and their imagination – to create an illuminated object or fixture.

 
Using the available items including LED modules, Gimigliano and Kalecinski were able to create a battery-operated ‘wearable aura’ of light, bringing fashion and illumination together. The team designed their creation ‘The NeckLED’ to instill wellbeing and define the boundaries of a personal micro-cosmos of warmth and comfort.

 

 

 

Santiago Calatrava’s Turning Torso Wins CTBUH’s Award – 10 Years After Completion

 

Rotating a full 90 degrees along nine pentagonal sections, Santiago Calatrava’s “Turning Torso” was deemed the world’s first twisting skyscraper upon its completion in 2005. Still Scandinavia’s tallest tower, the 190-meter Malmö skyscraper has recently been awarded a 10 Year Award by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH) for its continued value to the surrounding area and successful performance across a number of categories, including environmental, engineering performance, vertical transport, iconography, and others.

 

The CTBUH Awards are an independent review of building projects, judged by a panel of industry experts. Projects are recognized for making an extraordinary contribution to the advancement of tall buildings and the urban environment, and for achieving sustainability at the broadest level.

 

Turning Torso was featured in the CTBUH Best Tall Buildings Book, as well as celebrated at the CTBUH Annual Awards Symposium, which took place at the Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago.

 

source: CTBUH

Rotterdam introduces the Smog Free Tower by Daan Roosegaarde

 

An internationally known  Dutch designer and an innovator, Daan Rosegarden has brought to light his Smog Free Tower,  the largest air purifier in the world installed in Rotterdam, NL. The seven- meter- tall structure processes 30,000 cubic metres of air per hour- creating a pocket of clean air around it, making the fresh air available and free to the public. The smog is absorbed trough the top of the tower and the purified air is released trough the vents on the sides creating a zone of fresh air around it. Smog Free Tower runs on green energy and uses no more electricity than a water boiler. Furthermore, the pollutants extracted from the smog is compressed into tiny stones and turned into beautiful rings.  After its duty in Rotterdam, Tower ‘s next destinations will be Mumbai and Beijing.

 

 

 

 

sources: beforeitsnews, dezeen, techinsider, designboom

Manyata Embassy Business Park

 

To the north of Bangalore, India, is Manyata Embassy Business Park, one of the largest operational technology and business parks in the country. With commercial, residential, hospitality and retail components, on-site facilities include a large sports complex and intra-city transportation. International lighting consultant group DPA Lighting Design developed and implemented a lighting plan for the entire site including the soft and hard landscaping, pedestrian and vehicular circulation, and building facades.

 
At the centre of the entrance plaza, greeting visitors to the site, sits the ‘Binary Sculpture’ artwork.
DPA worked closely with Indian multimedia artist Romicon Revola, to implement her vision of creating a sculpture whose form was expressed by concealed integrated lighting. The sculpture itself is a three-metre cube constructed from stainless steel, with each of the four visible faces featuring an array of 0 – 1 binary cut-outs, making reference to the IT nature of work of many of the park’s companies.

 
The programmable LED modules allow color, brightness and fade rate to be controlled for an almost endless number of visually dynamic effects to be created, resulting in a vibrant, eye catching piece of artwork.
Embassy Manyata has been awarded the Best IT Park Project by NDTV Property Awards and the Best IT Special Economic-Zone by Software Technology Parks of India (STPI).